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27

Unless you have a very good reason - density, etc - I would advise against going with blades. A good 2U server from HP or Dell would provide all you need in the way of RAM. I personally prefer HP DL380's - I have several with 72+ GB of RAM. You really need to get a better grip on the fundamentals before you start worrying about what kind of hardware to ...


18

Blade servers are small, high-density, low form-factor computers, designed for maximum power in a small space. A blade server is mounted within a chassis, and the chassis typically takes on a lot of functions and parts that were previously done by the individual host. The chassis itself will hold the power supplies (resulting in less wasted power from ...


9

Yes, you do need the chassis. Blades typically don't contain much storage and lack network I/O on the blade itself. Because of the density, you need much better cooling than you would need to cool a couple of 1U servers. Unless you can specifically justify the need for blades, you're better off without them. The people that need them know that they need ...


8

No, they don't. Each and every blade is a distinct machine with it's own CPUs/IO ports/memory. They do connect to an (active or passive) backplane (which connects the verious IO options like ethernet etc.) and share the cooling and power equipment.


7

A "U" is a Rack Unit, or 1.75 inches in height. A 1U server would occupy a single unit's space within a rack. You would need to update your question to detail which chassis you're asking about. Different chassis can hold different numbers of blades, mezzanines, etc.


6

A blade server can be considered a rack-mount server that has a variable number of actual servers within it. When you buy a rack-mount server, you are buying a single server. A blade can be expanded as you get more money, buying additional blades without requiring more rack space. For some uses, this gives you flexibility. A blade takes several "U" of ...


6

I would say anecdotally yes. They are more noisy. Although often more efficient in terms of overall power consumption, the act of pulling and pushing air through passive modular components with large front and rear facing blowers is always likely to create more noise. Blades shouldn't need any external cooling equipment. Just a hot and cold aisle to deploy ...


6

The main benefits are space, power and cooling. The drawbacks from my perspective is cost. The individual blades are about as expensive as a 1U server, but the chassis is usually very costly. Plus if you have a chassis failure as a small business, you lose all your servers in that chassis, instead of just one. Unless you plan to buy two chassis and use ...


6

The most likely reason for seeing all the drives twice is that you have multiple paths to the SAN but haven't installed the appropriate MPIO driver for it. There should be a driver for the SAN to install so it recognizes the drives properly.


5

Are you sure that buying larger hardware (and then hosting it yourself (shudder)) is the right answer? What happens when the new host runs out of memory/cpu/storage/etc? Get an even larger host? I'd stay away from your weakness (managing hardware, this is your first ever physical host) and stay with your strengths (running a website) and investigate moving ...


5

You need the HP ProLiant Support Pack or management agents installed on the server to obtain this information from the Linux command line. Once installed, the hponcfg utility has a -g flag, which corresponds to "Get Host Information". The following is an example where I have a different name defined in the ILO (as you've done) than the one defined in the ...


5

Based on this and your other questions, I don't think you need blade servers. Modern systems have enough processing power, available cores and RAM capacity to reduce your virtualization footprint to only a few standalone servers. You stated this yourself in the question: you only need 2-3 hosts and a SAN to support your planned environment. For example, ...


5

Is this possible to place like a AMD 6970 HD graphics card on a 1u server? It depends on the specific server, but probably not. Model would be a dell, or hp probably. I'm looking at http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/400445182450?s...1423.l2649 and http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/110778364805?s...1423.l2649 Your links are truncated; there is an ellipsis in ...


4

mrdenny's explanation is really good. I will illustrate what he said with pictures. This is a Sun blade chassis : This is a 4-socket blade server, the connectors at the top are the backplane connectors : This is a blade switch : As you see, you plug everything into the chassis and it is very modular. Everything is connected inside with no cabling ...


4

Blade servers are high density boxes. In addition to typical rack servers, they may contain additional management tools. Also, blade servers are highly modular allowing for the substitution of individual blades (CPU, memory, controlers, etc). Additionally, some blade servers run with disks on back-end SANS.


4

With blade you'll generally find as many management functions as possible are centralised so that multiple blades can be dealt with via a single interface (see HP's Onboard Administrators/iLO) for this. Also, generally, a blade server will offer better power/heat characteristics than a pizza-box servers. Also of very great importance is the lack of ...


4

Yep. Console onto the server OS itself and use the hponcfg app to dump and edit the iLo configuration. Best bet is to dump the current config to a file, edit, then re-up.


4

When I read this: the doors are not too thick I get the idea that you should go to a shop and get a better noise isolating door. Simple. But remember the cooling. You are more than doubling the heat output.


4

No, there's no problems at all - so long as you're within your power and cooling budgets - and you're no more likely to encounter a network problem dealing with both blades and rack-mounters than if they were all one type or the other.


4

Will ESXi 5.5 in standalone mode (free) support fibre channel SAN? Yes


4

As far as I know, $ENV:NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS is derived from WMI, using: Win32_ComputerSystem.NumberOfLogicalProcessors To add to the confusion, Win32_ComputerSystem also reports the number of physical CPUs as NumberOfProcessors. You can use WMIC or PowerShell to assess these values: Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_ComputerSystem|Select NumberOf* If your ...


4

Windows 7 is not a supported operating system to run on that hardware, which is a good enough explanation for me at to why it's not correctly reporting on your installed hardware. The other reasons in Mathias' answer may ultimately be the cause too, but generally speaking, "unsupported configuration" is a good enough explanation for professional systems ...


4

Okay... I'm really curious why you want to run Windows 7 on these servers instead of Windows server editions. Can you give more specifics on your environment? You're using an HP ProLiant BL460c Gen9 server with two very high-end Intel E5-2697v3 14-core CPUs. While HP manufactured workstation-specific blade servers up until the Gen8 ProLiant line, there's ...


3

Not today, there was a time when a number of blade vendors were looking at using the blade traces to do something like this but given the huge increase in cores-per-die we'll see this year it's kind of pointless and none of them are really pursuing it anymore.


3

Given their requirements sound a bit 'wooly' and are actually quite low I'd be strongly tempted to virtualise this. I'd start with just two blades and some shared storage, then you can create, modify and delete their VMs as required, you'll lose very performance and gain a huge degree of flexibility, plus you can scale-out linearly and with no user impact.


3

If you have had much dealing with non-blade hardware in the past then 2/3 of your decision should derive from that. Other people will be able to provide you weighted anecdotal opinion but it is no substitute for experience. If you have previous experience of a vendor, then providing they aren't new to the blade market, chances are it will be largely ...


3

As there's hardly many vendors to choose from (IBM, Dell and HP basically with good penetration and many options) I'd say pick whoever you feel more comfortable with today - your local partner is probably more important than which vendor it is. I like IBM because their chassis are completely backwards-compatible with blades, while HP seems to have a ...


3

YOu Can find the password on management module interface backside of blade enclosure. remove the IMM module from bay and you can see the password on the top.


3

If you're buying a production server and you really need the performance, I would try and get an enterprise level SSD which means SLC NAND flash. The Crucial drive you mention is a consumer drive using MLC flash. A quick search shows that Micron has the RealSSD P300 in a 200GB version. Seagate makes an SLC enterprise drive called the Pulsar in a 200GB ...


3

This question seems a bit off. I mean no offense in any way, but are you aware that blade servers require a proprietary blade enclosure and other infrastructure to be present? If you're using blades, I would expect you to also be using a Fibre Channel SAN or similar for your storage. If so, then you should probably stay with your SAN for your storage needs. ...



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