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2

After rapidly switch on off the psu in furious rage, the server finally boots.


0

I ended up doing this by taking a VMware snapshot of the machine while frozen and then converting the .VMSN file to a .DMP file using the vmss2core tool. I had to use the -W8 option to get it to read my .VMSN file (-W and -W9600 didn't work).


0

If you press 'c' to configure, you should be able to see which disks are missing. Considering it was a power outage, you should be prepared for the worst-case scenario, that several drives have died. You will likely need to add new drives, re-build your array and restore from a backup.


1

With kernel-debug* you means both kernel-debug as well kernel-debuginfo as there is a difference between these two package Kernel-debuginfo: Provides a executable image of the kernel with all the debug symbols Kernel-debug: Enables some debugging code but not have same debug symbols on it ### Excerpt from RedHat Doc ### The kernel-debug enables the ...


3

As step 5 said in http://codingtip.blogspot.cz/2013/09/install-mongodb-on-ubuntu-1304-step-by.html use service mongodb start and sudo service mongodb start if not root. If the service doesn't start at boot automatically try to look at ls -la /etc/rc* | grep mongo, if no links there are present, then use update-rc.d mongodb defaults this should add links to /...


1

Your installation instructions step 5 tells how to start / stop the service. You just run sudo service start mongodb to start the server. If you want to make the service start up at boot, you can the follow instructions at askubuntu.com service command is the standard way of managing services in Debian derived Linux distributions like Ubuntu.


-1

Try install screen. Run on screen. Detach screen. Or run the command. Ctrl+z and press bg to put process on background.


-1

There is great flexibility in every Linux distro in general to execute scripts, code or other programs in initialization scripts, configuration files (via an include), etc..., just as long as the script, config file or whatever you use is in a security context that allows that. Depending on what your code needs to acomplish, you might need to run it after a ...


0

Adding the commands at the end of /etc/rc.local still seems to work as well. (Make sure that it is executable, though.)


1

According to Redhat staff: Grub doesn't support LVM RAID1 (it supports only RAID 4/5/6 type IIRC). Debian 8 has some old interior, you could hit the same limitation, I wanted to find some official info about Grub's limitations, unfortunately I've failed. Re: [linux-lvm] GRUB boot problem with lvm mirror type raid1 From: Peter Rajnoha <prajnoha ...



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