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23

You are forgetting your history. Nowadays, almost everything is a bridge, and your collision domain is just a cable, which only has traffic from one source on any given pair (and thus, no collisions). 20 years ago, you had large collision domains, and used bridges to break them up, both to allow larger networks and to increase performance. Subnets are a ...


15

Modern network switches are essentially multi-port bridges. A network bridge (aka a transparent bridge) has the following characteristics: It operates at the Data Link layer (OSI model Layer 2) It has only one incoming and one outgoing port (Source) It connects two similar network segments together According to the Network+ Study Guide, Fourth Edition: ...


3

Depends on what kind of bridge you are referring. I suppose a wireless AP can be looked at as a bridge between wired and wireless network. Now that we are using network switches (as opposed to hubs, like we did 20+ years ago), the switch acts like a multiport bridge. Nowadays things like bridging firewalls are used - a bridge which has firewall rules that ...


2

When teaching about Ethernet, often people describe the original way Ethernet used to work in the 80's, and the terms aren't always useful to describe how things work today. For example, they often discuss CSMA/CD at some length, whereas in practice, it isn't used by 99% of Ethernet devices. In the original Ethernet, a LAN was a thick coaxial cable with ...


2

As others have pointed out, switches are bridges. Bridges are really simple to set up. If you want some more computers connected, run a cable to a switch in the next room. Or bridge over wireless. The point is, these days bridges are the default minimal-planning way to grow a network, especially a simple one. If you exclude the special case of switches ...


1

You haven't really provided us with enough information to accurately answer the question, but I can make some guesses. It sounds like vlan1@eth1 is a VLAN interface (for VLAN ID 1) over eth1 (that is, eth1 is trunking at least one VLAN). This vlan1@eth1 interface is then attached to bridge br1. If that device is a standard Linux bridge, you should be able ...


1

ARP requires routing to work also. A common problem is that you have both an IP address assigned to both interfaces in the same subnet, on the host system's kernel. If you do this ARP replies will break - b/c only one interface will get replies. Make sure that you have a clean, single route back to the subnet. In the example above, if the tap1 and tap2 ...



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