Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

62

Advantages of BSDs The *BSD family of systems has (IMHO) a few key advantages over Linux, particularly for a server O/S. Simplicity and Control: None of the *BSD distributions have the imperative to add features that the Linux distributors exhibit. Thus, the default install of most BSD derived systems is relatively simple. Stability: Partially driven by ...


26

Well some software is specifically written for AIX/Solaris etc. while some 'money men' don't trust 'free' software (I've witnessed this myself, someone told me I HAD to spend money on OS!). But most of the time it's to get 24/365 support.


20

A personal favourite has always been "The Case of the 500-Mile Email" http://www.ibiblio.org/harris/500milemail.html Spoiler $ units 2411 units, 71 prefixes, 33 nonlinear units You have: 3 millilightseconds You want: miles * 558.84719 / 0.0017893979


18

Because then you have a big name behind it that you can talk to for providing a SLA.


15

The main advantages I see in building your own server / NAS: Speed -- The benchmark results of most the cheaper NAS boxes will show one common trait; they are slow. By building your own server with a fast CPU and a ton of memory, both very cheap these days, you can get much more predictable performance results. Flexibility -- Like other posters have ...


14

I don't consider BSD to be quite as mature as Linux on the Desktop but for servers it's rock solid. Whether you want to install BSD or not depends entirely on what you use your machine for. While many things are similar to Linux many things are different too. However here is a run down of the different BSDs OpenBSD : One if it's mail goals is to be the ...


12

What sort of load do you need to handle and (if you plan on needing to NAT) how many states do you anticipate needing to track? If under 50Mbit and 20k states or so, I'd highly recommend using an ALIX embedded computer. I have many of these deployed as router/firewall/vpn devices, running PFSense. PFSense is based on FreeBSD, so it's likely getting OpenBSD ...


11

For me the most amazing thing about the UNIX tradition is that UNIX was basically written by one guy - Ken Thompson while at Bell Labs. There is a fascinating account of this that can be found here: http://www.bell-labs.com/history/unix/ Some of the quotes are just priceless: "I allocated a week each to the operating system, the shell, the editor, and the ...


10

In the Linux world, distributions tend to be lacking in that... cohesive feeling. They are often built in a decentralized manner, which tends to lead to this. The BSDs are usually managed by one person, so you get the feeling that each variant is an actual product that had a lot of planning behind it. Things work together very well, and all components are ...


10

Check out ThinkWiki; it has SOOO much information on thinkpads and good configurations, etc. And I'd personally suggest a T-series thinkpad, just cause a bunch of my friends (and myself) have them, and Linux works incredibly well with them (after a bit of tuning, of course).


9

Some differences between using a full PC and a dedicated NAS: The full PC is going to use a lot more electricity (it's on 24/7), and have a lot more points of failure. This goes double if you try using some old desktop - you'll get a large, power hungry (100-200w, compared to 15-25w) box that probably isn't well designed to operate for long stretches of ...


8

BSD is generally considered secure by default, by disabling all but the core services. It's also very stable, you can tell this by looking at one of the many uptime monitoring services. Be warned however, that Linux isn't the same as BSD...there is a learning curve, so don't expect to jump straight into it. For example you'll find all the core commands, ...


8

tar never exits with an error. NEVER. Beware. Source: The UNIX-HATERS Handbook, page 31 (http://simson.net/ref/ugh.pdf) Sorry, no HTML version. This book happens to be chock-full of other legendry, and it's mostly still applicable. In my years of using Linux, I've run across many of these gotchas... just not any of the ones involving rm-ing my entire ...


8

Briefly... Linux is a kernel, FreeBSD is an Operating System. So you really can't compare them like you want. The major distributions of Linux each have various levels of compatibility and differences... but I'll try to hit the things you named at least: There are a couple different package managers (dpkg and rpm probably being the most popular) for Linux ...


7

You've reasoned this out on your own already. VMware has good Unix support. But many shops see a licensing advantage to Hyper-V, especially if they're primarily Windows-based. VMware at scale doesn't come cheap, but you can leverage your University's education status. Test both. Check guest OS support for YOUR needs, compare costs and ease of management and ...


7

Well vSphere 4.x only supports FreeBSD 6.x-8.x while vSphere 5.x also supports Mac OSX 10.6-10.7 - so one of those, anything else isn't supported.


7

The FreeBSD Handbook is your friend for all basic questions. The ports tree and the pkg_* system are one in the same. There are also additional pkg_8 management tools in the ports tree if the built-in ones aren't enough. Upgrading will depend heavily on your environment, but can be as easy as cd /usr/src; make buildworld; make installworld and horribly ...


7

Because you don't want to get locked into an open system. -- Unknown IBM executive, 1991


7

Adding to previous answers: It depends on what you are going to run on the server. Example: If you want to run Oracle, you go with (both hardware and) operating systems that Oracle itself says its (particular version of the) software is tested (certified by them) to run on.


7

Logging in with all caps http://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/unix/UnixFossilizationExample hrm. I fear I may have misunderstood the question :-) But I'm leaving the link, because I find it interesting!


7

I really like /usr/ports. This isn't to say that I don't also really like apt-get, but it's a pleasing feeling to know that your installs are being built on and for your particular machine, with any optimizations you felt like throwing into the makefile defaults. How much of the perceived benefit of that is superstition, I haven't done the research to find ...


7

As a Java developer, the big gotcha is there is no mainstream JVM for *BSD. Before everyone flames me out of existence, what I mean is, there is no current shipping JDK from Sun or any of the other major vendors (IBM, BEA/Oracle) so you will always be playing second fiddle to linux and window users.


7

*BSD is a complete OS, meaning the kernel and the userland is developed from the same source tree, whereas Linux distributions are butchered together from various sources. This is why BSD systems feel much more cohesive and solid. Also better documented.


7

Just a few issues: Pro (Free)BSD: ZFS filesystem/volume management Dtrace for tracing/analysis Excellent and easy to find documentation (FreeBSD Handbook, OpenBSD FAQ, Manual pages are really good and do actually have useful examples) Clean and rock solid OS release upgrade process Separation of the core OS from other software ("Ports collection") BSD ...


6

The original pipe symbol was ^ The original delete key was # The original "kill" key (erase everything on the line) was @ If you ever log onto an older system and can't seem to type a comment or an email address, stty becomes your friend. This is an example 7th ed login session where the person making the log was gracious enough to run stty.. Also, as ...


6

Sadly I don't know of any, but it shouldn't be too hard to write one. Once a night, run # du -a / > /var/lib/filesizes.txt. Then you just need a small script to sum those up. Something like: # perl -ne 'BEGIN { $total = 0 } if ($_ =~ m/(\d+)\s+\/var\/www\//) { $total+=$1;} END {print "$total\n";}' /var/lib/filesizes.txt If you want something a ...


6

You could define the curves with different names: rt, real-time curve, bandwidth/delay guarantee. ls, link-share curve, bandwidth/delay sharing (based on the configuration of neighbour leaves) ul, upper limit curve, maximum bandwidth/delay it may attain. What for do I need a real-time curve at all? Assuming A1, A2, B1, B2 are all 128 kbit/s ...


6

Use freebsd-update for official binary system updates. When you upgrade packages from ports (e.g. with "portsnap" and "portmaster" like I do) the packages' source-files ARE signed with SHA256 checksums and verified before compilation, so I wouldn't worry about that. Since it seems you're very much security-aware, I'd go with compiling ports from signed ...


5

As you've said, for auditing purposes, this is extremely non-ideal. By having multiple userids, you allow yourself to see who is doing what at what time. That's not to say it is foolproof. Nothing is really stopping them from either telling each other their credentials or other users stealing credentials. If you make custom software, I see your biggest ...


5

Corporate and government sector clients feel safer this way. They are used to paying for software and when something is offered for free they would think it is of lower quality. Technical support. When you pay for RHEL for example you are paying for technical support and updates. Hardware vendors sometimes lock you in the situation. For example IBM has a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible