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19

I'd go for the one machine from a reputable supplier, for the following reasons: Although you plan on having one machine "as a spare" now, I will bet you my firstborn that you will come under extreme pressure from your management to "make use of all that expensive computer gubbins", so that it won't be a spare for very long. When either of those machines ...


14

What you're talking about is known as bootstrapping a compiler. Typically this is done by cross-compiling the compiler on another machine for the target architecture. You can find some background here and here. It's not a trivial process, though. If your target isn't architecture that GCC already supports then you've got a lot of work ahead of you.


9

I found it quite convenient to installed different version in separate locations and just symlink to the version you want to use, like: lrwxr-xr-x 1 root wheel 7B Jun 7 18:26 /usr/local/foo -> foo-1.0 drwxr-xr-x 2 root wheel 512B Jun 7 18:26 /usr/local/foo-1.0 drwxr-xr-x 2 root wheel 512B Jun 7 18:26 /usr/local/foo-1.1 The benefits ...


7

You are right to think this isn't the best route. This route requires many manual steps, and is very error prone, and doesn't scale well. When working with linux distributions, you should stick to the package management as much as possible. The advantages of using package management: Dependency support Easy installation/removal Software inventory ...


6

i go one further, with locking down apt-get i lock down what parameters you can use, because we don't want someone installing or removing something. %admins ALL = NOPASSWD: \ /usr/bin/apt-get update, \ /usr/bin/apt-get dist-upgrade, \ /usr/bin/apt-get upgrade ...


5

Purchase. It's usually cheaper since your large 1u rack server companies are buying by the 1000s and you're not. Additionally when you need more the next month, they show up in five days. As a startup your time is better spent on building features, doing performance testing, etc which are all things you can't buy.


5

Yes, yes they can.


5

I'm not going to blow up my workstation for days on end by testing this, but given a directory of SRPMS I don't see why this wouldn't work: time (for RPM in $(ls *.srpm); do rpmbuild --rebuild $RPM; done)


4

I can live with 4 hour downtime, but it will not be comfortable. Am I better off buying or building? I see pro's and con's both ways. The costs you save on parts will most likely be cheaper due to quality and/or poor support. From RAID cards to memory and power supplies, saving a few bucks here and there is usually a losing battle in the end. If ...


4

$200 is not safe. If you want simple bottom end get the cheapest Dell you can find and add second drive to it to give you RAID1. This will be the safest way if you want a server. If you go with less then this, your data is not that important to you so just go buy an old something used thing. That may be blunt, but how important is your data to you?


4

Create a build environment and and set up a long chain of rpmbuild --rebuild packagename.srpm commands... But the better* approach is to simply go to CentOS.org. Download the ISO images for the current release from a local mirror server. *Assuming you're not modifying any packages.


3

I'd go with (ultimately) two 9-disk RAID6 arrays, with two hot spares (given that you'll be quite a distance from the hardware, you want to minimise the window of opportunity for more disks to fail) on Linux software RAID, with LVM on top. LVM allows you to easily grow the storage, unify multiple RAID arrays into a single volume group, and gives flexibility ...


3

Depends entirely on how much time you want to spend futzing with servers and hardware. 'a lot of large files' is a bit indeterminate, but offhand I'd start with something like a small box from Linode with possible extra 'disk' provided by S3 or SpiderOak or somebody if you end up needing really big storage. When you're doing a startup, the main way to ...


3

Are you running make -j and creating parallel jobs? Sun has a nice guide about that. The hypervisor idea is a bit silly. You want speed and I/O performance, something that a single vmware server is going to take away from you. You probably want to setup as many cores and disks as possible. These would be the two real limiting factors of your build system. ...


3

I hunted down this url which is the rules file for the deb from dapper (before you replied to my comment.) http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~ubuntu-branches/ubuntu/dapper/apache2/dapper/view/head:/debian/rules Here is the home for apache2 in ubuntu. https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/apache2 I couldn't find a link to Karmic from there, but i just replaced ...


3

It's not abnormal. I had this discussion before with someone building custom Android distros. You will need a lot more memory than 8 GB. IIRC they used a 32 GB ram machine.


2

Next time... how about compiling it into a *.rpm or *.deb?


2

There is no way to guarantee that the make uninstall process for the new version will do the right thing with the version you have installed. You'd also need to make sure that you had identical configure options with your new and old version. The risk that it will do the wrong thing is just too great, especially if you're running this as root. This is one ...


2

A $200 system isn't really feasible unless you get an old used system or parts being thrown out by a college or other institution; you can cobble parts together to fit that bill. BUT I wouldn't trust it. I use old systems for testing, for one-off things that aren't important tasks, etc...you'd be talking about slow systems with parts that are either ...


2

Startups need to manage their cash very tightly. At the same time, like pjz said, you don't want to stray from your core. I suggest you look at buying refurbished or used gear from Dell or HP. Keep things as homogeneous and consistent as possible.


2

I reccomend purchasing servers from a trusted brand. Such servers have been tested for stability and usually come with at least some basic hardware support services that will help minimize downtime. Also, unless you want to build something out of the ordinary, custom built servers tend to be more expensive. If you're buying full hosting, you might aswell go ...


2

At some point, the reliability of the rest of the machine will be lower than that of the discs. As you claim this is a "Home media server", I am assuming you will be using consumer-grade parts. The discs may fail, but at some point the rest of the machine may fail too. If you want it to be reliable, use redundant power supplies (20 discs is going to need ...


2

but I'm asking you all on the off chance there's a more coherent solution that combines the characteristics of the other question (ramdisk that overflows to disk) with this new twist (given enough idle disk time, the contents of the ramdisk make it out to disk too). What you're asking for is a deferred write mechanism, i.e. writes to the ...


2

You could also go half way and use a 2nd tier server brand like ASUS or Intel servers. What you get is the case, power supplies(s), motherboard, cooling system, and often the iLOM or iKVM. What you have to supply or get is: CPU, RAM, and storage. And of course install those items in the server yourself. We've used the ASUS 2U RS520 Xeon 'Nehalem' with ESXi ...


2

Previous almost-identical questions here and here. If it were me, I'd get an HP (or Dell or IBM or whatever you prefer) server to get all the benefits of a well-engineered system, then build up my own white-box server to use as a backup.


2

Generally switching to a distributed build environment means changing the build chain, as you don't want to use different compilers in development and production. That you mention games makes me assume that you are on VS and use windows, but I will offer some general recommendations Distmake http://distmake.sourceforge.net distcc ...


2

If you want something with "high quality parts", then pretty much any off-the-shelf server-class computer will do. If you want something with real redundancy, then you might want to buy two servers and some shared storage, and run the OS's inside a virtual machine. This way if one server goes down, you can boot up the exact same OS on the 2nd server and ...


2

Try yumdownloader --source openldap-servers rpm -Uvh openldap-servers* less rpmbuild/SPECS/openldap.spec According to that --enable-modules was specified, by the way. :-)


2

A Debian package is a multi-part archive that contains the data, and control information /debian. The data archive is basically extracted as-is. The control archive is extracted and mostly moved into /var/lib/dpkg/info and the pre|post-inst|rm scripts are called when appropriate. If you want to change something after your files are extracted then do it in ...


2

It seems that you create a binary debian package almost by hand using dpkg-deb command. While this approach is not that bad, you'll get better handling of a lot of things if you try to build packages by creating the source packages and then building binary packages out of those (even if it's architecture-independent files like PHP ones). This requires ...



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