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If you've shut the machine down and it's still answering, then the problem isn't the machine, it's something upstream. I'm thinking either your DNS is pointing to somewhere else, or you've got a rather aggressive caching proxy between you and the far end.


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It's a bug in Apache where it doesn't handle Etags properly for gzipped contents. Can be resolved by either turning off gzip (as you have noticed - but with the performance hit that entails) or turning off ETags (and depending on Last-Modified header for 304s - so no real loss). I prefer to turn off ETags. There is also an alternative option ...


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In .htaccess you can only cache all files from a certain extension like jpg. To cache a directory you have to specify each file within the directory in a manifest file which is linked to your html page. Your html would look like this: <!DOCTYPE html> <html manifest="manifest.appcache"> <body> ... </body> </html> Note: ...


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Yes, they will be cached separately. In fact, one trick developers use to force browsers to pull a new copy of a CSS file after they update it is to append something like ?v=2 to it (e.g. href="styles.css?v=2").


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It does matter. Quoting from the documentation for RewriteRule: The order in which these rules are defined is important - this is the order in which they will be applied at run-time.


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You could change the value of "request_timeout". This value does the following: "How long to wait for complete HTTP request headers after initial connection establishment." Just set the value like this: request_timeout 5 minutes Hope that helps.


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When I've seen similar issues in our environments, it appears to have been because of the way that OpCache (by default) shares a single cache across all users on a shared hosting environment. A bug has been submitted (and you can, and should, go and vote to let the maintainers know how important this might be for your use case) though no commitment has been ...


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When I've seen similar issues in our environments, it appears to have been because of the way that OpCache (by default) shares a single cache across all users on a shared hosting environment. A bug has been submitted (and you can, and should, go and vote to let the maintainers know how important this might be for your use case) though no commitment has been ...


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The solution was to use ServerXMLHTTP instead of the ActiveX version of XMLHttpRequest (or equivalent). https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms759169(v=vs.85).aspx Basically: var objSrvHTTP = Server.CreateObject ("Msxml2.ServerXMLHTTP.6.0"); Or whatever version you have installed ("Microsoft.XMLHTTP" or "Msxml2.ServerXMLHTTP" are other variants for ...


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Even you don't need to worry about it, you can delete memory cached files when you want just issue this command as root sync && echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches Here you can find more info. EDIT: Following the link if you echo 4 then linux will completely disable the caching of files, which is what you are looking for.


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Most likely some extra header is preventing nginx from caching the response.



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