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47

Munin and Nagios are really different tools. from munin website: Munin is a networked resource monitoring tool that can help analyze resource trends and "what just happened to kill our performance?" problems. It is designed to be very plug and play. A default installation provides a lot of graphs with almost no work. Nagios is a ...


11

I concur with lynxman. NAGIOS is for immediate qualitative data (is X OK or not?); munin is for historical quantitative data (how full is X now, and how full has it been this year?). All my NAGIOS installations, some of which monitor several hundred services, are linked to munin systems to do the quantitative monitoring. Note also that munin has specific ...


7

given that you already have a nagios installation, consider nagiosgraph or pnp4nagios. nagiosgraph and pnp4nagios do a pretty nice job of plotting nagios performance data. nagiosgraph has a parameter-based approach to configuration, pnp4nagios has a template-based approach. both automatically detect new hosts/services whenever the nagios configuration ...


7

Munin definitely works best in parallel with Nagios. It can also tie into it, sending notifications of thresholds being exceeding into the Nagios notification system. The reason we use it is because it is virtually trivial to set up new monitors. Nagios requires a little bit more effort. Note also though that PNP4Nagios gives graphing capabilities to Nagios ...


6

I ended up going with pnp4nagios. Installation was a breeze and there was no additional configuration needed to get it automatically graphing trends for every service (that produces graphable data) on every host. The entire process took maybe 30 minutes.


6

In a default polling scenario, where a single instance of poller.php is called by a cronjob, hosts are polled in serial. This is partially why it is normally not recommended to reduce the polling interval to be less than 5 minutes - since polling many hosts can sometimes take a substantial amount of time. If you have a need for high-frequency polling, or ...


5

Nagios is a monitoring and alerting system, which has graphing capability (if you pay for it). Cacti is a graphing system, which does not have alerting capabilities (at least not years ago when I used it last, and there's no mention of it on the Cacti site). The two are related (and often paired to avoid paying for the commercial Nagios implementation), ...


5

Start reading the official documentation for linux/unix here: http://www.cacti.net/downloads/docs/html/install_unix.html and the manuals here: http://www.cacti.net/downloads/docs/html/ For a default Fedora installation, try open your browser at http://localhost/cacti and use the login/password that you have choosen during the installation Follow the ...


5

cacti has a bad default graph which stacks the 3 values from load average. The total is meaningless, and that is what you are deceived into looking at. Change the default graph to use lines rather than stack and you'll see something better.


5

You have to erase these invalid future entries. Use rrddump to export your rra to an XML file, then edit the XML file. Set all the future time to NaN, and set the lastupdate to 0. Restore the RRD files using rrdrestore. Note, however, that depending on how far ahead your clock was set, you may have lost all your data! For a 5 minute average over a day, ...


4

Install the SNMP service from Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs > Windows Setup. Then go under Administrative Tools > Services, and right click the "SNMP Service", go to Properties, and there are a few tabs there to configure your SNMP community name, set access control, etc. Once this is done then you can query hard disk/network traffic/CPU, etc from ...


4

Maybe this will suit your needs: Quoted from this link: You'll need the SmartMonTools package and use *check_smart.pl* perl script (nagios plugin) to check hard drive health by running S.M.A.R.T. self-tests using the smartctl command, add to your snmpd.conf: exec CheckSmart /path/to/check_smart.pl -t -d /dev/hda


4

When I was trying to debug a custom script, I found it helpful to have the script append some information to a temp file every time it was run; that way I could make sure it was being called the way I expected. Things like the cmd line args, environment, and what value(s) it was going to return. You also might want to redirect stderr to a log file to catch ...


4

zpool status -x is the preferred way to check the pools status via a script. Its output is "all pools are healthy" unless there are issues making it a bit easier to use as a test. Otherwise as you get more than one pool your check script and greps will get more complex. So you can setup a cron job to run a script and make sure the status of that is "all ...


4

There is a pretty in depth answer that someone else has used for this problem below: http://www.thelazysysadmin.net/2009/04/monitoring-vmwares-free-esxi-35-with-cacti/


4

Rather than writing your own monitoring solution, I strongly recommend that you use an existing tool so that all the basic monitoring and alerting functionality is already implemented. If you pick Nagios, you'll get the basic monitoring of server and network resources for free, and the following plugins should give you most of the rest of what you need: ...


4

according to the snmp documentation; `extend [MIBOID] NAME PROG ARGS works in a similar manner to the exec directive, but with a number of improvements. The MIB tables (nsExtendConfigTable etc) are indexed by the NAME token, so are unaffected by the order in which entries are read from the configuration files. There are two result tables - one ...


4

I'll be honest, while I'm reasonably sure that this kind of setup is supported I've never seen a >2 host direct-attach SAS VMWare cluster before. I know it works just fine with 2 hosts but 3 or more is outside my area of expertise using this method. That said your stats look ok to me, ultimately you have some very slow disks in a R6 array so there's a limit ...


3

The setup described isn't as fast as it could potentially be. This is a supported arrangement, as you can have a maximum of four hosts attached to the setup (if you forego SAS multipathing). To your points: The performance is not good, but appropriate for what you have configured. I'll reference the Server Fault canonical RAID post, which basically states ...


3

I like Ping Monitor if you're looking for a free version. If you have a budget to work with the Solarwinds Engineer's Toolset has all kinds of awesome ping goodies. EDIT: Nevermind on the freeware version of Ping Monitor, it's restricted to 5 nodes.


3

Are you looking for a GUI? I've just started experimenting with Observium and fping. fping is an older tool, but it allows for simultaneous pings and is used by Observium behind the scenes. Observium also supports increasing a number of concurrent pollers to increase performance. It's a full fledged monitoring system though, so pollers are going to do a ...


3

I did investigate a bit further and realized the closing of the connection to the database is intentional. The connection should be reestablished for the next polling run. But it isn't. Here's an excerpt from poller.php: if ($poller_runs_completed < $poller_runs) { db_close(); // Debug message by myself echo "RECONNECTING IN " . $sleep_time ...


3

Cacti is capable of pulling data through a variety of means. Using the most popular templates (and most templates in general) provide the statistic data via SNMP or SSH. So to address your inquiry more directly: Cacti doesn't really require any special 'cacti daemon' to be run on a host to be monitored; I use it to monitor apache, MySQL, generic Snmp ...


3

Simple: Nagios was built with alerting first. Cacti was built with graphing first. Both have addons that will enable the functionality of the other, but it boils down to what you want. If you already have a monitoring solution, and just want performance graphs Cacti might make sense. If you want a single unified solution with an emphasis on monitoring, ...


3

This term will be highly subjective, but my personal solution would be "Envrionment" or "Environmental".


3

Could you try this command (OID is from Cacti log): snmpwalk -Cc -On -v 1 -c public 127.0.0.1 1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.11.52.0 If you don't get a result like .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.11.52.0 = Counter32: 250038, then edit /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf adding or decommenting: rocommunity public localhost And restart snmpd using one of: /etc/init.d/snmpd restart service ...


3

Nagios graphing plugins as you say are very restricted, they offer a very basic rrdtool interface and the UI design is a bit counter intuitive, it's basically a hack over nagios, tried to use that just for fun but it broke several times without warning. Going for a standalone product (especially munin or ganglia) offers you a big range of services that ...


3

Most likely, Cacti itself isn't going to be able to generate this kind of graph for you. You're going to need to generate your RRD graph manually using rrdgraph. The full solution is quite complicated, but the basic gist is that you create a CDEF with an RPN equation that nulls out the data during non-business hours. A very basic example that removes the ...


3

1.) Pulling a file down with wget doesn't necessarily accurately measure the speed of your connection as it's subject to upstream traffic conditions on whichever of many paths your provider may be using to reach your target host. You're additionally also measuring the performance of the TCP setup on your OS and even the efficiency of wget itself. This sort ...


3

You can get much more statistics using Bind and then graph it in Cacti. For this I advice you to upgrade to Bind 9.6 and use scripted attached to post here (http://forums.cacti.net/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=42218) to get various statistics. Setup instructions are also listed there. I found one more result from Cacti site: Bind 9.7 Usertemplate



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