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8

Evolution can communicate with the Exchange server. To connect to the Exchange 2007 server, you need to install the mapi-exchange package. http://library.gnome.org/users/evolution/stable/usage-mainwindow-starting.html.en#second-step


8

Thunderbird with the Lightning extension. I use this combination via DavMail gateway to get seamless access to Exchange. Works perfectly (and is much better/faster than Outlook 2007).


6

Not sure if you are willing to look into a complete collaboration suite. But Zimbra has awesome calendaring and not to mention the great email web client/server. They have an open source version(FOSS) which is great for most needs and a paid/supported version (Network).


5

The DAViCal CalDAV server will probably do what you're looking for (and has LDAP authentication). I use it with Mozilla Sunbird and it works great.


5

Have you tried Evolution? I used it for a while against an exchange server, and had no problem with calendar items.


4

Get your Exchange admins to upgrade to Exchange 2010. The web client is actually usable in Firefox, in fact it's almost identical to the experience in IE.


4

I have Outlook 2002 and this is in Tools > Options then Preferences Tab > Email Options > Advanced Email Options There is a check box called "Delete meeting request from Inbox when responding" If it's the same in 2003, I'd uncheck that!


4

The default is to publish free/busy data for something like 1 month into the future. You just need to change the settings in Outlook. It's easiest to accomplish with a GPO if you're in an AD setup. edit: Outlook controls the publication of the free/busy data. If you have a resource, you can either login with Outlook to the resource (use an Admin account, ...


4

If you're on Exchange 2010 SP1, you could enable Internet Calendar Sharing and publish User B's calendar in iCalendar format for User A to pick up. This Microsoft Exchange Team Blog post goes into detail on the subject, though it's a bit wordy and mixed in with some other cloud-peddling bumph. Probably the most relevant bullet point to you is this one: ...


3

I'm using Davical, very satisfied with it. Easy to use and with LDAP support.


3

I know you asked for non-MS, but Small Business Server 2008 does everything you asking for, is extremely widely supported, and is pretty easy to get going. It's not the cheapest at about $3000 Retail if you have a server already, but it's a fair amount cheaper if you buy it with a server (like from HP or Dell). You do have to consider the cost of support ...


3

Exchange 2010 SP1 introduces Internet Calendar Sharing, which essentially allows you to do what you want. The Exchange team posted a very detailed blog post recently about the topic, which I highly recommend you read over. Basically, Exchange publishes your calendar in iCal format which anybody can subscribe to. The instructions to set it up are in this ...


2

SOGo does all of this. I prefer it to other programs because its open source and doesn't restrict features between "community" and "paid" versions.


2

Check the settings on the Room Account. There should be an option to not allow conflicting meetings, make sure it's checked. Also check to see that you don't have any and/or all users in the "Out of Policy" meeting requests section. If it's supposed to be an Auto-accept style room you'll want that section to be cleared.


2

I had to go in and remove a whole bunch of duplicates manually to get it to a manageable size, then I was able to run ODIR and it seemed to do a good job of detecting duplicates. I haven't imported the pst back into outlook, but if there are problems I will post a follow up. I am mostly just posting this to provide info for anyone who would happen to stumble ...


2

I use crontab -e, crontab -l and su or sudo. ;-)


2

You could create a shared user for this purpose and all of the interested users rw or r/o access to that shared user's calendar. They could then schedule themselves for events as they see fit on that shared user's calendar. This assumes that all of your users are part of your Exchange server email system.


2

Just a thought, can you configure an autoreply for the resource accounts for the rooms that includes your text, or configure a signature so it will get sent when the room auto-accepts the invitation? It's been a while since I administered Exchange, so I'm not sure if those are the best, or even working, solutions to your problem. Also, you should include ...


2

There's a way to do it in Outlook and has been for years. When users click on their Calendar, they get a new button on the toolbar called "View Group Schedules." Then, they can make groups of users that they care about and view their free/busy times, and if they have reviewer or better rights, they can see details. If someone is handy with programming, you ...


2

This is almost certainly a time zone issue in OWA. Outlook adopts the time zone of the host operating system; both of your client machines are configured for the same time zone, so the appointment is displayed at the same time on both machines in Outlook. Outlook Web Access can't make the assumption that the client machine where the web browser is ...


2

Does she have recent/future calendar events? By default it only goes back a couple of weeks, if I remember rightly. You can change this after setting up the Exchange account - it's one of the options near the very bottom of the Mail/Contacts/Calendars screen.


2

I don't believe you can do this. Entourage is a very limited mail client and isn't a Mac version of Outlook exactly. In fact, Entourage accesses mail via Outlook Web Access, so in a way you can consider it more on par with the features of OWA than with the Outlook client. Perhaps just making the link to the SharePoint calendar more accessible is your best ...


2

There's no built-in way to do what you want, but here are some nice third-party instructions: http://exchangeshare.wordpress.com/2008/05/27/faq-give-calendar-read-permission-on-all-mailboxes-pfdavadmin/ This utility should do it too, but I've never used it: http://www.slipstick.com/files/setperm.zip Do be sure you use groups in your permissions so that you ...


2

There unfortuantley is not an easy PowerShell command to do this, however using PFDavAdmin - the Public Folder DAV admin tool from MS, you can do so. This article explains the process in doing so.


2

It is possible with Powershell but it only effects current mailboxes. Future mailboxes won't have that access. What you could do is just do a windows schedule and run the powershell command for it. Another option is to use the SetPerm tool which edited the permissions on the default mailbox. This has the advance of being for all future mailboxes.


2

This can easily done with the setperm utility. I've honestly never used it for Exchange 2007 only on Exchange 2003, but it shows as supporting it. There is also some great screenshots and info here: http://telnetport25.wordpress.com/2007/07/25/exchange-2003-change-mailbox-folders-permissions-in-bulk/


2

You might try taking two users who have this problem and launching Outlook on their machines with the /cleanfreebusy switch, which will reset the free/busy bitmap for their calendars. You can then try scheduling meetings between the two of them and see whether that fixes the problem.


2

Could be done with Sharepoint, assuming you have made it available to the outside world already. Or, you could sync your internal Calendars with something external, such as Google Calendar, which can be shared selectively.


2

As mentioned by LEAT, to do this you will need to setup a trust between your two seperate Active Directory Forests. Firstly, you will need a link between the Forests, in your case it looks like your going for a VPN, once thats up you will need to setup your DNS on both domains so that the Exchange servers can resolve each other. Once that is done you need ...



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