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32

In a word: fiber. Your solution could be as simple as two media converters and 1000 feet of multi-mode fiber with matching connectors, at a cost of under $500 total for actual networking components. You would need to plan the run carefully to prevent the fiber from being damaged during or after installation. Compared to copper, fiber is easier to break and ...


17

I'm no expert either but I'm on board with what you've stated in your question. My opinion is that the vendor is giving you a snow job in order to make more money off of the job by selling you CAT6 cable. My recommendation is that unless you plan on moving to 10GbE (CAT6a cable needed) in the near future then stick with CAT5e. GbE (1000BASE-T) will happily ...


16

As you deduced, 6e is a marketing term that was used before the formal adoption of 6a. The "things" in question that have been modified generally have to do with the number of twists per inch and the existence/type of shielding on the cable. The question isn't really whether 6 vs 6e vs 6a will -support- 10GBaseT, but rather at what distance. Cat6 is ...


16

While Ethernet runs should extend up to 330 feet, as you've found many pieces of cheap equipment don't meet that specification. The most reliable solution you'll find here is to run fiber from one building to the next. It provides inherent galvanic isolation, so there's no need for surge suppressors (which probable don't work the way you think they do in the ...


15

Networking wire isn't just any old spool of wire. It's rated for the frequencies of the signal going down it (CAT3 for regular phones or 10Mbs Ethernet; CAT5 for 100Mbs Ethernet; CAT5e, CAT6 for 1000Mbs Ethernet), there are pairs of wire twisted in certain ways to reduce the cross-talk between wires, there may be shielding to reduce noise from outside, etc. ...


11

Read the wikipedia articles on this stuff. There is no real advantage of cat6 over cat5e. Specifically, both can run gig ethernet the same distances and when you go to 10gig ethernet, neither is 100% guaranteed to work. If you want to be able to run 10gig ethernet over copper, you need a 100% cat6A cable plant, not just cat6. With cat6, you can run up to ...


11

This question is still missing an authoritative reference, so here it goes: There is no minimum length specification to a 1000BASE-T segment. Charles E. Spurgeon - Ethernet, the Definitive Guide, p. 163.


10

There is currently no reason to use Cat6 cables when connecting to hosts. Cat5E is all that is required for gigabit connectivity. In fact, if you upgrade to 10GBase-T in the future, it may still require replacing Cat6 with Cat6a. I should add that the Cat6 that I have worked with in the past was much more difficult to route than Cat5e. I'm not sure if ...


9

What each wire in the cable does depends on how the cable is wired to the Ethernet connector. In addition, to allow straight-through cables to work, end nodes typically have transmit/receive reversed with respect to switches. Most modern devices detect this automatically anyway. For 100-base-T, the standard for wired fast Ethernet connectors, the connector ...


8

It. Does. Not. Work. That. Way. Ethernet over Cat5/6/7 is point to point only. It does not work like a telephone line (despite looking similar). Each wire must go only from one device to one other device.


8

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8

Including aluminum in conductors decreases cost for the manufacturer. If the cable meets the various specifications for impedance, crosstalk, etc and the cable is run within spec (bend radius, proximity to interference, strain) then the materials utilized for the conductor don't matter. The physical difference between cat5e and cat6 has to do with the ...


8

Get a tone generator (http://www.amazon.com/Fluke-Networks-PRO3000-Tone-Probe/dp/B000FTADX0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1383596496&sr=8-1&keywords=tone+generator) and plug that into the terminated end and use the probe to find the cables on the other end. And anytime a cable is pulled make sure the installer plans to label them cables in a manageable ...


7

No. Certification of cables requires specialized equipment - which is (as you discovered) quite expensive. Accurately measuring crosstalk at 500MHz+ isn't something that NIC hardware is designed to do. If it were, it would also be quite expensive. The real rub here is that a given NIC / switch port might negotiate even 10GE over cables that don't meet ...


6

So long as the UPS has it's manufacturer recommended: Shielding (usually just the metal case, as it came) Grounding (usually part of the UPS's power cord or an external grounding lug) you should be fine (assuming the equipment isn't horribly defective). I have 100'+ runs of Cat5e along 220v line, sitting up against the back of the UPS (cabling enters ...


5

Proper termination of Cat 6 (6a) is much more critical than 5e. This will require a greater skill level for the installers. If you are simply using patch cables, then the distance is probably short. For 1Gb speeds, 5e will work fine for short runs and most long runs. If you are using long runs through areas of high RF/EMI, consider Cat 6, otherwise Cat ...


5

Depending on your switches you might not require external media-converters - just plug in an appropriate GBIC/SFP into the switches and you are go. I'd consider the fastest possible connection your switches are able to handle - there is no difference in price (as Gigabit is much more common these days than 100Mbit) and it's never a good idea to save a few ...


5

We've not had any special strategy other than unspooling and pulling in segments along the way to relieve stress on the cable. Pull a little, move down, pull again, move down, repeat until reaching destination. Then pull a little more for slack. Once pulled and tested there shouldn't be any other problems over time with the cabling if it's testing okay as ...


5

Cat 6a cable is supposed to provide a bandwidth of 500MHz. Some cable analyzers will be able to report on that. Cat 5e can support full duplex gigabit operations, so in the vast majority of applications even cat 6 is unnecessary at present, but I guess requirements are requirements...


4

Some cable vendors may not want you to know that 1000BASE-T was designed to run 100 meters on Cat5, not even Cat5e. See Panduit white paper at Cisco site. Another under-publicized fact: you may not want 10GBASE-T (10 gigabit Ethernet over twisted pair, even Cat6A) unless you want to live with maximum round-trip delay specs that are fifty (50) times slower ...


4

Generally speaking, if you mix "better" equipment with "lesser" one, your performance will be somewhere in between them, possibly even better than when using only lesser equipment: CAT6 cabling will not bump your speed up if you have 100 Mbit switches, but CAT7a cable could give you better EM shielding than CAT6a and thus reduce spurious network errors. So, ...


4

It's generally not recommended to run copper directly between buildings as individual structures tend to be separately grounded (or earthed, if you prefer). Even a relatively small difference in potential can destroy equipment and even create a hazardous condition for people working on the equipment. Perhaps more to the (immediate) point connection ...


4

The main benefit of cat6a over cat5e is the support of 10Gbit for distances over 100 meters. If you can install it, you should, the cost to put these in your infrastructure outweigh the potential cost of having to rewire the building in the future. I personally would go for future proofing, since cat6a is still dirt cheap, even when more expensive than ...


4

The PSE (Power Sourcing Equipment) and PD (Powered Device) negotiate to see if the end device is compatible of being powered and at what standard. So plugging in a non PoE device will not damage said device. Here is a good read about the basics of PoE


4

A simple Google search could have given you what you needed. From Wikipedia: When used for 10/100/1000BASE-T, the maximum allowed length of a Cat 6 cable is 100 meters or 328 feet. This consists of 90 meters (300 ft) of solid "horizontal" cabling between the patch panel and the wall jack, plus 10 meters (33 ft) of stranded patch cable between each jack ...


3

Generally speaking the better cables will reduce noise on the line. This is not that much of an issue unless you are pushing the distance limits. You can do 10GBit over telephonwire if it is less than a meter. It is when you get above 50m or so that the cable types will start to have an actual effect on your performance. What you will typically see when you ...


3

Unless you really need to push a lot of data right now, I think in the future with the trends for selling laptops and handheld devices convenience will trump speed as long as it's "good enough" and you'll see improved use of wireless, if for no other reason than cutting down one more wiring run that has to be done to each workstation (and people keep wanting ...


3

10/100 will work with 2 pairs (4 wires). Faster requires 4 pairs (8 wires.) Power over Ethernet requires more than 2 pairs (usually.) Note that if you have "6 wires" I'd be very certain it was CAT5.


3

I've never seen a minimum cable length recommendation. This feature seems like a fairly straightforward power-saving feature. Shorter cable runs incur lower power loss. According to the NetGear documentation, there are actually two separate power modes, both of which can be enabled. One of the modes is for cable less than 10 meters. ...


3

According to: http://www.ctrlink.com/2006_07_01_archive.html there is no minimum length when using a Star topology. (one node connected to each port of a switch). In the older times, when you had an Ethernet ring, there had to be minimum distances between devices to prevent impedance problems on the ring. Concerning the low power mode, are you sure ...



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