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37

Just to map a network share directory you would use this command: net use \\Server\ShareName\Directory This mapping would not be persistent and would have to be established and authenticated at user login, and you would access the share using the UNC path and not a local drive letter. If you want to access the network share through a location on your ...


26

[Edit] I've since tested this the full release of Ubuntu 10.04 Server (21/May/2010). I've configured my Ubuntu 10.04 Server LTS residing on a windows network to authenticate logins using active directory, then mount a windows share to serve as there home directory. Here is what I did starting from the initial installation of Ubuntu. Download and install ...


20

Ports 137-139 are for NetBios/Name resolution. Without it you will have to access machines by IP address opposed to NetBIOS name. Example \\192.168.1.100\share_name opposed to \\my_file_server\share_name So port 445 is sufficient if you can work with IP addresses only.


11

This apparently possible, according to this StackOverflow post. Before posting the content of the answer, however, can I suggest that you're over-complicating this? In situations like this where some crappy piece of code needs a user logged on to run (like Domino server, grumble) I've created a service account that's to always be logged in on a given ...


9

I had exactly the same issue but with Samba 4 exports and Windows 7 clients. It is definitely client side error. After some thorough troubleshooting, I simply added the registry key and it worked like a charm after hitting the F5 button once. Only had to add this registry key: DirectoryCacheLifetime[DWORD] = 0 ...


9

For network windows shares you need to specify the uid/gid that the drive should be mounted as and/or the file and directory modes to use since Windows doesn't understand Unix users and Linux doesn't understand Windows users or permissions. Right now, the share is probably writable but everything is owned by root so no other user can do anything. Try: ...


8

A quick note about Openfiler (and I hear NexentaStor is the same) when used as an iSCSI target - you are almost guaranteed to see timeout errors and targets dropping offline, requiring a reboot of the server to correct. This usually happens under heavy load (though I've seen it happen under light loads, too). We went through hell with Openfiler using iSCSI ...


8

You're probably missing the fact that Offline Files must be enabled on the client side in order for files and programs accessed from the Share to be cached offline. Additionally, only files and programs that have been opened from the Share are made available offline. Simply accessing the Share doesn't cache it's contents in the Offline Files cache.


7

I have finally solved the problem. I'll try to write this answer out more when I have the time. The issue is connected to resharing a cifs filesystem, and then accessing this from a Windows7 computer. The samba bug is here: https://bugzilla.samba.org/show_bug.cgi?id=9346 This apparently stems from the way information is set on the inode in cifs. See ...


7

Syntax of mount.cifs: mount.cifs {service} {mount-point} [-o options] You need to pass the options after the "-o"; for example, if your options are rigth (not tested) your command should be: mount.cifs //myserverhere.com/cifs_share /mnt/cifs_share -o user,uid=65001,rw,workgroup=DEV,credentials=/root/.cifs


7

In my experience the kernel mode server out performed samba with my clients. If performance is your number one concern, skip samba. That said, there are a number of limitations to the Solaris kernel-mode SMB/CIFS server, most notably: Only runs in the global zone. Samba can run in multiple isolated zones and/or the global zone simultaneously. Sharing ...


6

There is no built-in functionality to do what you're talking about, per se. What you're looking for is a reasonable enough desire, but not something that Microsoft has implemented as a feature with the granularity you're looking for. The "Logon Hours" functionality (located on the "Account" tab of the user's account properties in "Active Directory Users and ...


6

Check na_options. http://filer/na_admin/man/man1/na_options.1.html cifs.smb2.enable This option enables SMB 2.0 support on the Filer. When this option is enabled, the Filer uses SMB 2.0 with a Windows client, if the client supports SMB 2.0. When this option is disabled, the Filer will not accept any new SMB 2.0 sessions; existing sessions ...


6

the mount command is on the client side and doesn't control what the server allows. you need to set up the share on the server so that anyone in a particular group ("valid users = groupname") can connect to the share, and then force the connection to be as user henry ("force user = henry"), regardless of what username/password they actually logged in with. ...


6

ok, i've re-read your question and have another answer. when you mount it in /etc/fstab or with sudo mount from the command line, you need to set the uid and gid and optionally the umask too (file_mode and dir_mode) so that local users on the client can use the share. otherwise, it will default to being owned by root and W only by root. and it probably ...


6

A more secure solution than that proposed by SvenW, and one that is more in keeping with the Apple way of doing things, is to add the password to the keychain. Here's how you would do it for an AFP share (I assume all you'd need to do is change the protocol specified by the -r option but I don't have the possibility of testing this with SMB right now; note ...


6

tftd, try escaping the $ character with a \ mount -t smbfs -o username=MyUsername //10.0.0.2/D\$ /mnt/machine_1_d dc


6

The short answer is: Meh. On a file "Move" (AKA Cut and Paste) between the same share it will simply change the index on the file server (pretty much instant). Unfortunately when you try to move between two different shares (Even on the same file server) or do a "copy" operation it does pull the data through the client PC (slow). On any "move" operation ...


6

Durable handles are part of SMB 2.0 Resilient handles are part of SMB 2.1 Persistent handles are part of SMB 2.2 which is now called SMB3 My main references for the following are: https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/SMB3_kernel_status and although this was originally for Samba3, it has more details: https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Samba3/SMB2 Durable ...


5

Direct mounting is not possible, you should mount the share to the host first and then use lxc.mount.entry configuration directive to bind mount share's mountpoint inside the container (an example of using lxc.mount.entry can be found here). You can also provide the container with an external fstab file as shown here.


5

CIFS is an implementation of SMB. For all intents and purposes they are the same thing.


5

If I understand, essentially you want to use FreeNAS as both a NAS and a directory server. At the moment, this is not possible. The samba server included in FreeNAS can use an existing LDAP or Active Directory server for authentication, and this works great -- we've used this setup for quite some time. You can easily control the users and groups allowed ...


5

We're doing this with our Active Directory domain joined (winbind) Debian boxes. We use pam_mkhomedir to create a home folder under /home/EXAMPLE/$USER for AD users at logon. Then pam_mount performs the mounting of the AD home directory. On Debian, we needed to install libpam-mount, pam_mkhomedir was installed by default Once installed the following ...


5

What is the OS of your client and server? One thing that can make a difference is to update your servers to windows 2008 and your clients to Vista. When you do this you get to take advantage of SMB2 which is less chatty, has larger buffers, and can do multiple things in a single request making it less sensitive to latency.


5

It looks like mount.cifs has to be setuid to allow normal users to mount shares. It is possible to set the mode for mount.cifs to setuid root to allow non-root users to mount shares to directories for which they have write permission.


5

You need some sort of VPN. Windows 2008 server has the built in Routing and Remote Access service which has a VPN component and would allow remote users to dial in, or if you've got lots of remote users on the same network a site to site VPN might be easier to manage. This could be achieved (again) with RRAS or you could use a dedicated hardware VPN ...


5

There should be an /etc/auto.smb already, use that, and add the following line to /etc/auto.master: /cifs /etc/auto.smb --timeout=60 Now all cifs shares will show up under /cifs: ls /cifs/<server> will show all the shares available. You might want to put some options in /etc/auto.smb to mount with specific modes. I have a auto.smb that I ...


5

There seems to be more momentum behind NexentaStor. You haven't provided much detail on the hardware arrangement other than it being old. What are the CPU/RAM numbers? However, one reason I'd go the NexentaStor route is the presence of inline compression of its storage volumes. Your setup probably isn't suitable for the deduplication features, but the ...


4

You're experiencing Samba bug 4715, reported as Debian bug #612503. Currently the recommended fix is to add directory name cache size = 0 under the global section in smb.conf.


4

The CIFS/Samba implementation in FreeNAS is excellent, we have several FreeNAS boxes and VMs going in an active directory enviroment, using AD for permissions on the shares. It's also extremely easy to set up and configure. Once we've set up the FreeNAS box and enabled the CIFS/Samba service, we add the following to the 'Auxiliary Parameters' box in the ...



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