Hot answers tagged

12

Have you considered KVM?


12

If the files are stored at the filesystem level without user-based encryption and with no ACLs then yes, run away. If ALL data was stored within the database then I would feel slightly less hesitant but even still, any vendor that says it's ok (especially when HIPPA is in the mix) to use shared ID's is suspect in my book. If you join the machine to a ...


11

Wait - you're asking for server grade NICs but want to buy a 350 bucks switch?! I don't get that ... Usually "server grade" 48 port GigE switches go for somewhere around 3000-5000 USD list price. Maybe you want to look out for switch side things like stacking for cross-stack LACP. Regarding the NIC, things like: proper DMA interface and good drivers that ...


8

The VMDK file is the actual virtual disk, an ovf file is just a settings file (plain text), that VMWare products (like ESXi Server) and other virtualization software (like Virtualbox) can use when importing the VM. You may have an existing settings file (like a .vmx) which you can convert into ovf format using VMware's tool 'ovftool': ...


7

Yes, certainly. F5 BIG-IP Cisco ACE Foundry (now Brocade) Server Iron Juniper DX series (being discontinued) Zeus ZXTM (available as software or appliance) There are also (quite many) cheaper load balancer appliances. Some examples: Coyote Point Barracuda KEMP Technologies The one thing that stands out in your post is caching. Many load balancers can ...


7

Agreed, with profile sharing comes a whole host of issues - not the least of which is the inability to have good accountability (or even ANY accountability) for exactly who did exactly what and exactly when it happened. Find another vendor - one that adheres to basic security principals. Try to find someone with a SAS 70 type II certification if possible. ...


7

Short answer: no, it is not. From a recent RackSpace KB article possibly outlining the root cause of your problem: Uninstalling the existing XenServer Tools software will render your server inaccessible. This is due to the simple fact that the XenServer tools contain paravirtualized drivers (networking, storage) necessary for the virtual system to ...


6

Once connected to remote desktop, drag Citrix window across both monitors. Press the maximize button, the client will maximize to both screens and be presented as a dual-monitor setup.


5

Windows 2003 SP1 went out of support in April, so your OS does not get any security patches anymore. You need to upgrade to SP2 ASAP. SP2 also has lots of random bug fixes in it - your issue could go away. If your OS has that old a patch level, there is a good chance some drivers - specifically print drivers - could be out of date on the box too. As ...


5

As far as I can tell, Citrix XenServer offers the following on top of Xen.org: Technical support (free and additional paid) XenMotion, for moving active VMs across hosts Windows GUI Windows drivers It'll work with Citrix Essentials for XenServer


5

The nearest thing in concept to a dedicated Type 1 "Desktop" Hypervisor at the moment is probably Parallels Workstation Extreme although it is still a hosted Hypervisor. It relies heavily on relatively new hardware virtualization capabilities (Intel VT-d and Xeon 5500 series CPU's for starters) to allow the guests to selectively gain direct access to the ...


5

This is all surprisingly similar technology - well at it's most basic anyway. Firstly I just want to define the difference between terminal-services and virtualisation; Terminal services such as Citrix's older products, MS TS etc. work by having code executing on a server and the display of that code being transmitted and redisplayed on a client, the ...


5

I might suggest using Terminal Services Easy Print. http://blogs.msdn.com/b/rds/archive/2007/04/26/introducing-terminal-services-easy-print-part-1.aspx


5

@DejanLekic: tune2fs etc do only scan the file system for errors. The kernel error messages you observed are about hardware failures, which is one layer beneath the file system. Modern file systems and operating systems are taking hardware failures very seriously; ext* remounts itself as read-only to prevent any write access causing further damage, XFS shuts ...


5

I'd really like to say that you should avoid using any G3 ProLiant in 2013... especially for virtualization... Anywho, the XenServer HCL does not include the G3 ProLiants. You need a 64-bit CPU per the XenServer software requirements. One or more 64-bit x86 CPU(s), 1.5 GHz minimum, 2 GHz or faster multicore CPU recommended The HP ProLiant DL360 G3 systems ...


5

I'm Dan and I'm addicted to VDI. This answer can (and does) span several books, but let's give it a go: VDI is definitely in vogue, for sure, but remember - the basis of it isn't really new technology. Citrix Winframe started life on Windows NT and Citrix has been offering access to centralised Windows apps and desktops ever since. The ICA protocol is even ...


4

accordingly, UltraVNC supports seamless windows. XPRA also offers this functionality, but it's only for X sessions.


4

It should be fine doing a defrag of the drive online, since the Xen disk images are just files like any other. You should try to do this off hours as performance will likely suffer greatly during the defrag. The reason you're seeing high fragmentation is that VDIs are sparse disk images. Even though you specify a VM has (for example) 100 GB of space ...


4

since its win7 just boot the vhd natively! http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd799299(WS.10).aspx


4

You're asking about doing a small iSCSI SAN, and you're on the right track. We do something very similar with Dell servers and MD3000i arrays. In the diagram provided, you show two links from server to switch. I think you can get away with one link, unless you're bonding them for greater throughput. As shown, the arrangement protects against failure ...


4

If you don't already have SharePoint, I would not bother implementing it, for exactly the reasons you described. XenApp can already do that natively. The Citrix WebPart looks slick, if you're already using SharePoint as your portal. If you're not, you're doing a lot of work for 0, and I mean 0, gain.


4

The privilege path that the password reset system is taking is identical to what happens when an administrator resets the password; the service account that the self service software is using will be assigned the same rights. It's a simple privilege against the user account, which overrides the password change rate-limiting restrictions in the password ...


4

Zeal, what I have done to get virtual Ubuntu hosts is to first follow the steps on this website. This will give you an Ubuntu 10.04 Template, I then used this template with newer version's of Ubuntu server via an ISO. Although you may be best to just run 10.04 to avoid any complications which may crop up in the future. I also thought it might be worth ...


4

It could still be the XFS filesystem in this case. You may have heavy fragmentation issues as well as the slowdown that comes with a nearly-full filesystem. You could benefit from more space in either case. Please check the XFS filesystem's fragmentation. You can do this with the xfs_db command. If the filesystem is /dev/sdb1, for example, then you command ...


4

This can happen if you set your network configuration prior to installing the XenServer tools on the guest. Open device manager on the server, and ensure you have "Show hidden devices enabled" (View menu->Show hidden devices). If you see any additional network adapters listed, such as Realtek RTL8139 devices, remove them from device manager. Then ...


4

You have bad information. Citrix provides a equation to answer your underlying question about CPU assignments. XenServer 5.0 Update 3 Admin Guide (p. 140). http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX120713 : Provision just enough Virtual CPUs (VCPUs) for each VM's workload. Don't give a VM more VCPUs than it needs to do its work. If the server in a VM only needs ...


4

Getting SSDs just for the hypervisor is a waste of money. It should be running from memory most of the time, so you would just see faster boot time. Unless faster boot time for a host is of critical importance to you. In most cases I would expect you would get better bang for your buck elsewhere.


4

You can disable and hide the C: with Group Policy but be warned that it's not 100% fool proof. Ensure your write permissions are good and that you're users aren't administrators, but if you're letting someone connect to a machine you shouldn't have anything directly sensitive on that machine. Citrix best practice would be to Silo sensitive apps and data ...


3

Couple things here. When working with ClickOnce apps, pay particular attention to your profile situation. As of .NET Framework 3.0 you could not run ClickOnce apps with mandatory profiles. This was supposed to be remedied in .NET 3.5 but I haven't had the opportunity to verify that claim. If you're using roaming profiles you have a couple options here. ...



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