Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

As Chris S says the optimum block size is hardware dependent. In my experience it is always greater than the default 512 bytes. If your working with raw devices then the overlying file system geometry will have no effect. I've used the script below to help 'optimise' the block size of dd. #!/bin/bash # #create a file to work with # echo "creating a file to ...


11

There are many ways to copy disks, file systems or files. Generally, copying the file system gives you a good clone with the flexibility that it can be a slightly different size on the target system. With the target system running some sort of live Linux (knoppix, ubuntu live, etc.), booted from a cdrom, you can create the partitions on the disk using ...


11

I strongly recommend that you familiarise yourself with WDS - Windows Deployment Services. You can do something as simple as deploy a fresh, blank Windows image to every computer on your network, or you can build your own custom image (this is what you want). In a nutshell: Build an image the way you want it to be Perform a "sysprep" function on it Load ...


10

There is a file: "/etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules" (might be called a bit differently on your system), which stores rules "about naming devices". So a device with MAC0 is given name eth0 (usually first device found), device with MAC1 is given eth1, etc. line from file (device with mac 11:22:33:11:22:33 is named eth0): SUBSYSTEM=="net", ...


7

What you want is to use an imaging solution that can multicast the image to multiple clients. This way there is only one data stream containing the image that can be read by multiple clients simultaneously. You would PXE boot the clients, they would request the image from the server, then the server would begin sending a multicast stream of the image that ...


7

I've performed file-level clones (using the Linux NTFS Tools ntfsclone utility) of Windows 2000 and Windows XP. I haven't tried ntfsclone with Windows Vista or newer versions but I wouldn't expect any problems. I use Microsoft's file-level cloning tool, ImageX, quite regularly with Windows XP and Windows 7 and have no problems there, either. I generally ...


6

What Mikael said but I would sysprep the image so you get a unique SID if you are involved with a domain. Then it will be real easy to just copy the image, deal with the networking ids, then run though just a few steps depending on how you sysprep the image.


6

On the source machine: dump -0 -f - / | ssh -c blowfish root@target_machine "cd /; restore -rf -" This will dump the fs on your source machine, copy it over ssh and on the target machine it will restore it. Of course you need to repeat this for every fs. 'blowfish' is there just to make it for faster compression and decompression.


6

Instead of creating new partitions, look at resizing your existing partitions. For this, I use GParted. http://gparted.sourceforge.net/ Specifically, I use the GParted Live CD which you can just boot into from CDROM. http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php With it, you can resize your partitions and most file systems (excepting some LVM and/or MD ...


6

Your problem is that you have used all four primary partitions, and your extended partition ends at 145211534. What you need to do is increase the size of your extended partition. Which will permit you to add additional logical partitions within your extended partition. Though if that was my system I would have setup LVM instead of copying a bazillion ...


5

You can regenerate new host ssh keys using the following command: ssh-keygen -t dsa -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_dsa_key If you are on OSX, the location is actually at /etc/ssh_host_dsa_key. Also, you can substitute rsa for dsa if you prefer.


5

Clonezilla will work if you run sysprep before cloning it. Make sure the PCs are the same, you'll have to enter the COA key in fore each machine and reactivate them, but no biggie.


5

You're saying you have a drive that is failing, the drive was in your domain controller, and you had no other controllers? And your server had one drive? Ouch. Um...well...if you're trying to recover data and the drive is actually failing you might want to score some kind of backup software first and run a backup at the file level; cloning the drive may be ...


5

RAID is a much better use of these disks. You could setup 4 or all 6 of the disks in RAID10 and get better performance and redundancy - if one drive fails, you don't need to restore from backups, you just need to replace the disk. The server and everything on it keeps running the whole time. However, RAID is not a backup. It won't help if you delete a ...


5

What is the cluster size (allocation unit size) on your source volume D (actually on the filesystem inside your TrueCrypt container) and on your target volume F? One hypothesis for the drive filling up, is that volume F has a larger cluster size, and volume D has many small files. This would mean that the same data could take up significantly more space on ...


4

The third option is to dump cloning and instead use a proper system configuration management tool such as Puppet or Chef. Cloning is a really bad idea for systems that you need to maintain over time, as you need to apply changes to all machines currently in the field, as well as respinning all of your clone masters. If you use a proper management tool, ...


4

VMWare's free VMWare Converter Standalone will also do this, and most of the time it does it very well. For general image-work Microsoft's WIM format (part of the WIndows Automated Install Kit - WAIK) also has some very nifty feautures that makes it well worth your time to look into. There are even some freeware GUIs you can use on top of it so you won't ...


4

shut down the machine and export. To replicate the machine copy the export folder into your Hyper-V directory and import it. NB you can only import once, so import a copy! yes. JR Re Michael's question: You can't export a machine without shutting it down first. You could snapshot it (e.g. www.drivesnapshot.de) and then restore the snapshot to a new ...


4

You copied the partition, but not the MBR. Copy the first 446 bytes of the device itself.


4

You will certainly be interested in an article that I posted recently on my blog about important folders to backup (for Ubuntu but also applies to Debian). It regroups common files that are usually changed by users. At least on a webserver. Here's a summary. If you look at the actual article, I've put commands related to each step. /home entirely /root ...


4

VMWare Converter can do most modern OS's without shutting the server down, but as Dennis pointed out, we really need to know which OS you're running. You'll end up with a virtual image of your server when you're done, rather than a raw disk image, but it's usually good enough for most work, depending on what you want to do with it once you've done it.


4

Yep, called mirror-splitting, assuming you have a HP E/P-class controller - just remove (the right) two disks from server1 , replace them with two blanks, that'll then rebuild. Meanwhile boot server 2 from JUST the two disks you removed from server 1, wait for boot to finish (it'll error like crazy) then stick two blanks in server 2 and again wait for ...


4

The solution I'd use for taking a point-in-time snapshot of a running system is the (free) Idera/R1Soft Hot Copy product. Using this, you can take a clean snapshot and rsync the entire copy (or portions of the copy) to another system.


4

Why did you decide that a Git SSH URI must have a : after a hostname? Where did you see this format? Formal SSH-URI specification is ssh://[user@]host.xz[:port]/path/to/repo.git/


4

The problem with copying a live filesystem from VSS is that that the existing Windows instance will probably have the signature of the new disk already in it's registry. When you boot the copy, the signature of the partition it is booting from is matched to the registry and mounted as D: or E:, rather than the C: it should be. You can sort this out by ...


4

At a guess, /etc/fstab is referencing disk by-id, and the Id's have changed as part of the clone process. This may cause the problems you're seeing. If this is in fact the case, you can verify this through emergency mode. Log in as asked Examine fstab for values Examine the contents of /dev/disk/by-id to make sure the values match If different, adjust ...


4

If I understand correctly, you want to create an image from the start of the disk to the end of the last partition. The parameter for dd that does this is count=. Your last partition ends on 103, and your unit size is 8225280 bytes (according to the fdisk -l output). So you could simply modify your command this way: dd if=/dev/sdb of=myimage.img bs=8225280 ...


4

You absolutely, never ever want a backup to disks in your system. This isn't a backup. If your system dies, it can knock out all hard disks (same with fire, flood and other catastrophes). If your server get attacked, the attacker can delete all disks in the system, etc.etc. Always back up to external media, preferably off-site or move them off-site in ...


3

I can't answer your question directly, but perhaps help a bit anyways. First of all, I was going to do some exporting and importing when rebuilding out two Hyper-V servers as a cluster when R2 came around with Live Migration support. I tried exporting and importing, but could not get it right. I found no simple answers to why either, so I simply ended up ...


3

If you've already run the SharePoint Configuration Wizard then the SharePoint is effectively tied to that machine. But up to that point you are able to clone it. You can then script the rest. Have a look at this question on Stack Overflow (should be moved here) for more info.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible