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17

dd just reads from block 0 to block 99999 and copies the data. Clonezilla understands filesystems and understands when there is nothing to be copied (because that's empty space or data from a file that's been deleted). Once you know not to copy all the useless data, it is much easier to copy the real data. From the web page "For unsupported file system, ...


8

You should be able to mount your CloneZilla image to extract files from it. See instructions here. Prepare a large disk in Linux Say if your image is /home/partimag/YOURIMAGE/, and the image is /home/partimag/YOURIMAGE/hda1.ntfs-img.aa, hda1.ntfs-img.ab... run file /home/partimag/YOURIMAGE/hda1.ntfs-img.aa to see it's gzip, bzip or lzop ...


7

This is a 32-bit OS. You're trying to move to a dissimilar architecture with a very old OS/kernel. You should really rebuild onto the new hardware and migrate your data. There's no way this would work without major surgery.


7

Yes, what you're suggesting is possible, and precisely what you'd use these tools in combination for. You'd use Clonezilla or Cobbler to push out the initial installs, and Puppet to keep the configurations in sync once they're installed. (And FYI, the other popular configuration manager for Linux you didn't mention is called Chef.) Clonezilla doesn't have ...


6

There really isn't a canonical answer to this since it would depend on disk subsystem speeds, fragmentation, etc. so it doesn't quite fit this format well. That said, if it's a "clone" of the drive, it will try to copy the entire drive, sector by sector. The way to get the end image smaller is to compress it. Backups are generally done at the file level. ...


5

Well, that depends on what Clonezilla uses to do the cloning. It uses different tools depending on the type of partition, taken from their website: Based on Partclone (default), Partimage (optional), ntfsclone (optional), or dd to image or clone a partition. It will use them in that order typically to try and copy your partition. dd is a last resort ...


4

We faced the same problem and found the following to be excellent for explanations: http://gparted-forum.surf4.info/viewtopic.php?id=16400 http://sourceforge.net/projects/clonezilla/forums/forum/663168/topic/4511817 Our configuration: Debian/kFreeBSD (sid) tftp-hpa (5.2-4) Clonezilla Live Image (current stable 1.2.12-67) The cause of the problem, ...


3

Using 3rd party tools to write NTFS filesystems scares me, personally. I'd copy the contents of the RAID-10 partition to another machine (probably two machines, actually) using something like ROBOCOPY or XCOPY to preserve the permissions and metadata. I'd also make sure I had a good backup. Then I'd take two backups of the RAID-1 boot volume using the ...


3

Taken from this article: There are some limitations. As pointed out earlier, Clonezilla can't restore an image to a drive that is smaller than the original drive. It also doesn't allow for retrieving specific files in an image, it's the whole partition or nothing. Since the Linux way is pretty much a lucky hack, I'd wait until this feature ...


3

None of the major hypervisors will do this as what you're trying to do isn't virtualisation but emulation. There is a fairly basic IA-64 to x86 emulator HERE but I think you may struggle to find something really useful.


3

VMware Converter lists Ubuntu as a supported source machine, so I would suggest using it to convert the server (from a VM to a VM) and edit the disk to the appropriate size during the conversion. http://www.vmware.com/products/converter


3

Following the advice of this forum post I was able to fix the problem by entering advanced or expert mode in clonezilla and checking the "-fsck-src-part" option. I suppose this fixes drive inconsistencies and was able to clone the drive.


2

Clonezilla cannot restore a larger partition to a drive that does not have the capacity to handle that partition. Thus if you backup a 200 gig partition, even if it only has 10 gig in used space, you cannot restore that partition to a 100 gig hard drive. My work around was to use restore the image to a larger capacity drive, then use GParted to resize the ...


2

Well, this is actually a more interesting problem than it sounds like. There are 2 ways to clone a server (well, there's probably more, but there's 2 that I'll touch). 1) Clonezilla. You download the CD ISO, write it to a CD, boot it up, make a disk image of your server. Copy it to somewhere like a NFS share that both servers can access, then boot the ...


2

In your Microsoft license portal, you should have an option to use KMS keys. KMS is the Microsoft Key Management Service, and is the proper method of activating/licensing systems deployed in the manner you're planning. Here's a tutorial on setting up a KMS host server.


2

You can use strings command to access registry files, I tested in my machine and it worked: strings /media/cuonglm/Windows/Windows/System32/config/SOFTWARE | grep -e '^6.1.*' | head -n 1 Ouput: 6.1.7601.17608 It denotes my version is Windows 7 SP1. I think it is the faster way than using some tools to manipulate properties of PE files, or registry ...


2

Get the list packages that are installed on the system and install the corresponding packages on the new machine. Tweak your new machine's configuration as needed. Afterwards, you can copy over every file that is not identified as owned by the package management system as well as manually deciding which configuration files are related. For avoiding the ...


2

Assuming you are deploying Windows. Your tasks can be baked into any image (See Sysprep). Anything that can deploy an image should do the trick after that. Alternatively, (and here is my MS plug for the day), if you have a 2008 R2 server setup -- consider using MDT2010. It's quite easy to setup and can easily handle your pre/post install steps. It's ...


2

You can easily create a restorable image using Symantec Backup Exec System Recovery 2010. They have a 60 day demo that will allow a running system to create an image. That image can be restored to same or different hardware or even convert to an MS or VMware Virtual machine image. You can alos recover individula files from the image and the image can be ...


2

Actual steps to follow: 1.create config-file for wpa_supplicant # touch /etc/wpa_suppl.conf 2.edit it with vi-editor # vi /etc/wpa_suppl.conf there should be: network={ ssid="your_ssid" psk="your_key" } then: # wpa_supplicant -B -iwlan0 -c/etc/wpa_suppl.conf -Dwext # dhclient wlan0 Thats all


2

Based on some googling I suspect you have a mismatch between the version of squashfs used to create the filesystem and the version you are trying to use to uncompress it. What version of squashfs do you have installed? I recommend you try upgrading to a newer version and see if that helps.


2

Install clonezilla, then run /opt/drbl/sbin/clonezilla (Debian might put this somewhere different, if it's not there, look around a bit for it) . There's a curses-based GUI that will take you through the process. You don't have to screw around with command line arguments at all. As far as installing it, it should come with DRBL, which you can find at ...


2

You will need partclone to be installed in the "rescue System". You can also use a dd+gzip to make the image and then restore it. You can also transfer over the network with netcat. Destination: nc -l 12345|gzip -d > /dev/sda1 Source: dd if=/dev/sda1 bs=1024000|gzip |nc 1.2.3.4 12345 Where 1.2.3.4 is the destination IP. And 12345 is the port in ...


2

Clonezilla allows creation of automated procedures of cloning and restoring by adding a simple script to its live cd or dvd .iso image. In a nutshell, you can: Add a shell script with appropriate clone or restore commands into the .iso image of the Clonezilla live cd or dvd Edit the isolinux.cfg file adding an appropriate boot menu entry that passes the ...


2

I've made a video that demonstrates how to restore the full disk backup into a virtual machine. Hope it helps: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ainjV3X6wqQ Basically, what you need to do is: Create a VM in VirtualBox (free) Create a virtual disk image for the VM with at least the same size of the backed up disk Store your clonezilla backup in an external ...


2

Appreciate you don't necessarily want a commercial app. Symaantec Backup Exec System Recovery 2010 will image a running system and also convert it to VM if you wish. Works well and has saved me a great deal of work many times. Lots of other features. Should be a freee 60 day trial here: BackupExec


2

To make the netboot image accept any dhcp, run this command on the DRBL server: /opt/drbl/sbin/mknic-nbi -c n The caveat is that DRBL clients may fall back to assuming that the NFS shares are on the gateway address given out by DHCP. In a nutshell, DRBL assumes that your netmask is 255.255.255.0 and falls back otherwise. You can change this assumption by ...


2

Regarding the error "Unable to find a live filesystem on the network", I indeed diagnosed this to be due to the failing tftp download of filesystem.squashfs. ($ cat live.log in the busybox) Digging deeper into the error I found that editing the fetch parameter in /tftpboot/pxelinux.cfg/default fixed this problem for me. By default it looks like: APPEND ...


2

Because you're using LVM set up on those specific drives, I'm not sure I'd want so much a clone of the system as just a straight backup. Otherwise you might restore to a system that doesn't take kindly to the drive configuration you restore to. Personally the only time I clone things now is if I'm making a workstation image to roll out to labs or if I'm ...


1

I've actually used this tool: http://www.drivesnapshot.de/en/ and found it to function... but I would 100% NOT rely on it as a backup-tool for disaster recovery. Backing up a running system has too many moving parts to be done on-line reliably. There is still no substitute for backing up your important data files when online... and doing a offline backup ...



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