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36

I am going to orient this answer as if the question was "what are the advantages of chef-solo" because that's the best way I know to cover the differences between the approaches. My summary recommendation is in line with others: use a chef-server if you need to manage a dynamic, virtualized environment where you will be adding and removing nodes often. A ...


36

What they're talking about is that when you use a CNAME to point to their services (which is only possible on subdomain, not the zone root - it can't coexist with the SOA and NS records that are required on the root of your zone), they can make a change to their own DNS records to work around some kind of availability issue. With a zone root, you must use ...


34

Amazon's FAQ says it's not possible to define a security group anywhere but at launch time.


22

From the Berkley cloud computing blog: Recently, a colocation facility owned by Core IP Networks LLC was raided by the FBI and the entire datacenter was shut down. "Millions of dollars' worth" of computers, many owned by other companies colocated in the datacenter that had no connection to the companies being investigated by the FBI, were confiscated and ...


20

Remember that 'cloud' is just a buzzword, intentionally undefined to refer to almost any kind of setup. So, you should first separate apples and oranges. Fortunately, some slightly more precise terms are appearing. First, the big three kind of services: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) Platform as a Service (PaaS) Software as a Service (SaaS) ...


18

Mnn, you're not really confusing things, or at least you're not more confused than many other people are about "cloud computing". Cloud computing (CC) has become one of those trend-words, fashionable words that get used in lots of different circumstances. To me, cloud computing just implies a service somewhere between Infrastructure as a Service and ...


18

The typical experience for a general purpose server workload on a bare metal\Type 1 Hypervisor is around 1-5% of CPU overhead and 5-10% Memory overhead, with some additional overhead that varies depending on overall IO load. That is pretty much consistent in my experience for modern Guest OS's running under VMware ESX\ESXi, Microsoft Hyper-V and Xen where ...


16

Disclosure: I work for Opscode. The major benefit of Chef Server over Solo is the ability to use search with your infrastructure. The classic example is a load balancer with web servers. The load balancer can automatically update its configuration as web servers are added and removed to the infrastructure, simply by searching for them. Solo is just that, ...


15

"Performance" has many aspects. The n00bs measure the boot time of an OS, and say e.g. Windows 2012 is sooooooo great because it boots in 12 sec on real HD, maybe 1 sec on SSD. But this sort of measure not very useful: performance is equal to OS boot time, but the OS boots once a month so optimizing that doesn't make much sense. Because it's my daily ...


12

The only possible reason I can think of is that they want to force you to regenerate new keys. As these keys were generated before you had access they may not be trusted. Removing them and restarting sshd will regenerate the keys for you. However the document doesn't really make that clear. This is pure speculation and it would be better to contact them ...


11

Take a scalable infrastructure like the one I'm working with. In my case, the amount of work we can crank out scales well with the number of processing nodes we have running. We have some in-house capacity and are working to use exactly these kinds of services for demand that exceeds our in-house capacity. When we need it, we deploy a bunch of processing ...


10

Update AWS has enabled this feature in the EC2 API. It is available as the --virtualization-type option to aws ec2 register-image in the new Boto based awscli. Original answer Yes! Unfortunately, there is not a direct way to do so. Also, some PV instances may need kernel and bootloader modifications. Create a volume from your existing PV AMI. If it was ...


10

Cloud computing is not so much a technology but a system built around four basic concepts: Abstraction - the user does not need to know the underlying hardware that is running the system Elasticity - resources can be added and removed from the system easily Democratisation - users can allocate more or less resources without needing administrator assistance ...


10

EC2: When you need a lot of CPU power at unpredicatable times, and don't want to actually store anything. Google App Engine: When you're a cheap-ass Python programmer whose site is never going to get more than a few hits a day (and you want to make sure you can never use a different hosting provider). Microsoft Azure: When you want to make extra super sure ...


10

Real 100%? No. Five nines (99.999%)? Yep. Five nines is about five minutes unscheduled outage/year. You can get more reliability if you want, but five nines is where the cost for increased reliability is really taking off. You can approximate four nines as less than an hour outage/year, three nines as less than nine hours and six nines as about half a ...


8

Yes. But that is not the question. The difference is normally neglegible (1% to 5%).


8

Cloud is one of those over-used terms that mean different things to different people. However, since you mentioned elasticity, what that means is the ability to scale resources depending on requirements. Assume for a moment that there is one VM with 64MB of RAM serving a website. There are only a few people using it. Then suddenly, there is a spike in usage ...


8

"Cloud" is marketing BS. Generally people expect that there is a cluster of hypervisors running the show, but given that there is no formal definition of 'cloud', it can be just about anything. The newer CPUs support hypervisor acceleration through several different technologies, so they're generally the most common as you'll get the best performance out of ...


8

I just wanted to throw this out there, as in my other answer to a Cloud hosting question: "Cloud hosting" is just a re-branded VPS, most cloud solutions scale in no way. You could argue this on several points, but this is what it boils down to. The one thing that I have seen more and more "Cloud" providers offer is instant provisioning of servers - this ...


7

Cloud is a masking term for the idea of 3rd party network based services. Those services could be infrastructure (Amazon S3), platforms (Google App Engine), storage (online code repositories), or applications (Pandora). It's definitely a vague buzzword, but there are advantages in the economies of scale for small companies that may not be able to afford a ...


7

Matthew, I work for OpenStack and am happy to provide you some guidance on service providers implementing it. First, it's important to note that there are two OpenStack projects: Compute and Object Storage. It sounds like you are looking for Compute, but FWIW on the Object Storage side Rackspace is currently running this code as "Rackspace Cloud Files". ...


7

As an addition to @ShaneMadden's answer, one workaround is for the third-party platform to also manage your DNS zone. For example, if you use AWS's Elastic Load Balancer service, and their Route 53 DNS service, you can reliably point the zone apex at an ELB instance using their custom alias records, which allows them to update your DNS zone in response to ...


6

Half the point of cloud solutions is to be able to scale up quickly and then scale back again when you don't need the extra power. They charge per unit of time (or per unit of other resources) so that you can flex how much you have quickly. If your web application gets +300% use during the evening, why pay for servers you don't need for the rest of the ...


6

Conceptually, the process is simple: start copying all the RAM for a VM from one physical host to another over the network, keeping track of which memory sections you've already copied have been updated after you copied them. Repeat the cycle for the changed RAM until the change set is small, pause the VM, copy the last bits of RAM (and the CPU register ...


6

Basically, you can not. Whom do you charge for wasted fuel when you get stuck in a traffic jam? This is part of your business risk. Don't want to defend - shut down your instances, no traffic then. Regardless how bad you feel for it, Amazon still provides your service and you still use up amazon resources.


6

You should let Google handle the mail reception / sending if your cloud should not take care of it. The MX DNS type is specific to mail and conveniently indicates (with priorities) which server will actually handle mail reception for a given domain. Thus avoiding the need to specify a mail server / subdomain. But it may work also without the mail. prefix, ...


6

In regard to costs, it is not necessarily true that S3 will cost more than EBS. If you have a 15 GB EBS volume, you pay for all that storage whether it contains 1 GB of data or even no data yet. With S3, you only pay for the actual data stored. Your strategy should be to use EBS for the mounted volume but to always back EBS up to S3. In the past there was ...


6

Although I haven't been billed, I have spoken to vendors about their policies in this regard. Basically they cut you off when it gets very bad (in their view potentially affecting their whole network), but otherwise they will bill you. DDoS against your servers is not something they feel they need to absorb. I was investigating for an ecommerce outfit that ...



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