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20

Remember that 'cloud' is just a buzzword, intentionally undefined to refer to almost any kind of setup. So, you should first separate apples and oranges. Fortunately, some slightly more precise terms are appearing. First, the big three kind of services: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) Platform as a Service (PaaS) Software as a Service (SaaS) ...


10

Real 100%? No. Five nines (99.999%)? Yep. Five nines is about five minutes unscheduled outage/year. You can get more reliability if you want, but five nines is where the cost for increased reliability is really taking off. You can approximate four nines as less than an hour outage/year, three nines as less than nine hours and six nines as about half a ...


10

1) Do NOT use VMs How about a TV that doesn't show images, or a plane that doesn't fly? Clouds are about nothing BUT VMs - anything else is called "a bunch of ill-used hardware".


9

If you're using the server as a local network server (File shares, Exchange, SQL Server, Domain Controller, etc), you should not move it to the cloud. These servers should be as close as possible to the clients in the network to optimize response time, so moving it to the cloud will make things much slower. In addition, these servers should usually not be ...


8

Originally posted by cyberx86. Please remove this notice once the post has been cleaned up. This question seems to get asked a lot - usually with specific reference to Amazon's EC2 - but I think the general ideas still apply here. Firstly, see this question and this question for an advantages/disadvantages comparison of cloud vs. vps/dedicated. As ...


7

When they need it. When it's cheaper to hire someone and buy stuff than it is to subscribe to a service. When they want something that's not "off the rack." I've heard of someone running a small business off an ipad. I've talked to someone else who's very interested in possibly colo-ing SQL for their one person company. To answer your specific ...


6

You need IPsec, but not in Tunnel (VPN) mode. You want to use IPsec in transport mode. Microsoft makes this comparatively easy to set up and manage servers with the combination of Active Directory group policy and certificate services. On *nix... you've got quite a bit of scripting to do, and lots of reading.


6

I wrote this answer to a similar question. That was about defining some of the buzzwords around cloud services. With those definitions in place, you can say that IaaS is exactly like a VPS; except that typical 'cloud' vendors let you start and stop as many instances as you want, and charge after the fact, while typical VPS vendors make you sign a contract ...


6

You sure can. The command you're going to be looking for is ec2-migrate-bundle, and there are a few web sites with how-tos. http://www.dotanmazor.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=96:ec2-ami-move&catid=16:2008-11-14-08-43-34&Itemid=48 http://chansiulun.com/2010/05/11/how-to-migrate-your-ec2-server-to-singapore-region/ ...


5

The ec2-migrate-bundle tool migrates only S3-based AMIs, which are for launching instances with ephemeral instance storage mounted as the root volume. If your root device type is EBS, that isn't going to help you. AMIs for EBS-backed instances are stored as EBS snapshots. Here are instructions for moving an EBS-based AMI between regions.


5

"Cloud" services are a bit like web 2.0 -- you take an idea that isn't well understood but isn't new either, and you give it catchy name, and suddenly everybody is talking about it. Cloud services are based on the "virtualized data center" idea sold to us 10 years ago. Cloud hosting is (usually) simply a virtual private server environment, except with the ...


5

There is no such thing as 100% uptime. Software breaks, hardware fails, and you can only mitigate these to a certain extent. Cloud computing is a misnomer, because it still relies on a hardware/software backend. That being said, I'm sure there are companies out there who have taken the necessary precautions to minimize the chance and duration of an ...


5

I would recommend that you do an actual test/evaluation of both options. They have different characteristics that are going to impact applications in different ways. A cloud server and a dedicated server are not the same thing for all types of user.


5

I've used EC2 in my previous job, where I managed 30+ instances, and I'm currently evaluating RackSpace for a future project. As the other have said, EC2 is more expensive and more mature. One specific EC2 feature that isn't on RackSpace is suspending a server. Cloning instances is also easier with EC2. One specific use case: Easily setup staging servers ...


5

http://arpnetworks.com/ gives very affordable VPS solutions. You get VNC and serial console access, and can boot off an unmodified FreeBSD-8.0 release DVD in the "tray", so you can rewrite your boot disk to your heart's content. Very happy with them.


5

How about s3fs? Performance is going to be pretty bad, but I know it's used with satisfaction by many people.


5

Anything other than a real workload will not tell you if the new system is faster. It could have slower CPU, less memory, slower disk but still give faster throughput simply because it's closer to your userbase. fio is handy for comparing disk I/O. ab is better than nothing - bt for more realistic testing then have a look at www::mecanize/http::recorder.


4

If security isn't a huge concern, I would recommend using Amazon's EC2 instance. If bandwidth is an issue, you could very easily use the /async switch for replication. Joe Field has an excellent article on how to host Windows Domain in the Cloud


4

If by the repeated use of the word "cloud" you mean a virtualized environment, sure. It won't be fast. You may overextend your resources. Or it might run decently enough for what you're doing. It entirely depends on WHAT you're doing. My MacBook Pro is pretty good with web surfing and word processing and email...I don't think I should use it for weather ...


4

You're missing something. Specifically, the difference between High Availability (and the degrees thereof) and High Capacity/Scalability. A "self-healing cloud server" (also known as "a machine that reboots itself" -- hardly high technology worthy of the grandiose marketing term) provides you some degree of high availability against a small subset of ...


4

For some reason, it was suggested that if we offered a "cloud" -- whatever that is -- that we'd be one of a kind and it'd help our business. Stop listening to people that throw around terms that they don't understand. Imagine a network diagram. You have your servers, your switches, your firewall, and a cloud representing the external network -- the ...


4

HP does indeed offer a vulnerability scanning service as part of its Enterprise Security Services. Their whitepaper seems to imply that it's required. Unfortunately, HP's web site is in a persistent state of disarray, (and has been for years) and information is rather hard to find. But it seems that they do indeed offer (and mandate) this service.


4

I think you misread the MongoLab specifications. It has a default of approximately 3.9 GB - not a max 3984 GB! It's a US decimal mark, not a thousands-separator (why do Americans insist on doing this way??). The max for the large plan is 20 GB ;) Update: I just looked a little more at the MongoHQ site and found an interesting discussion on their support ...


4

You've got three questions in one here, so let's take them in the order you asked: Typically, you would use a CDN for serving static assets such as Images/CSS/JS. CDN and Cloud/Static are not the same thing. With CDN, you provide the CDN your assets and they take care of the rest. Cloud/Static are used for dynamic content and you would configure things ...


4

These sites can help you with interpreting bonnie results: http://www.textuality.com/bonnie/advice.html http://www.issociate.de/board/post/478953/Understanding_bonnie++_results.html http://sourceforge.net/projects/witme/files/bonnie-to-chart/ First though - I'd like to address some inconsistency here: You've done three different test sizes and haven't ...


4

In datacenter-grade equipment, you're looking at at least $1000/core currently, with large memories. Which is a pretty damn good price, IMHO. But the problem is that of capitalization. A lot of that is underutilized, even using tools like Surgient or VMware/LabManager. So you move to the cloud on-demand. Have a huge process that needs to run for 3 days ...


4

It sounds like you don't want hosting, you want a build and test environment. If this is just for development, find out how to become an IBM VAR or partner or licensed developer or whatever the hell they call the appropriate program, and then you should be able to get access to their labs. Every big UNIX vendor has something like that. If you're in the ...


4

I have been using RootBSD (http://www.rootbsd.net/) for years and remain impressed. Low-cost, excellent tech support. Lots of different VPS plans.


4

Using UEC enables you to build a private cloud, which means that you are building a replacement to Amazon EC2. You do not need EC2 when you're using UEC internally, and you get to keep all your data and systems running behind your own firewall. Of course you'd have to actually run the datacenter youself, which is not an easy task. Using some management ...


4

There is no way to tell whether Cloud Computing is a revolution or just a fad right now. It could be either. It is absolutely a buzzword right now, and as such suits often misuse it totally. But that doesn't preclude it from being important. If you've read Clayton Christensen's "The Innovators Dilemma", you know how new technologies may be inferior to ...



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