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40

Yes, you can do that. It is called colocation. Essentially you provide the server and the colocation provider supplies everything else: power, cooling, security, and in some cases they provide bandwidth in some cases you can provide it yourself. They will base the cost on how much physical space your server takes up, how much power it uses how much heat ...


16

Actually, they are bundling the cost of a maintenance contract with the hardware vendor into your monthly fee. The real advantage is that you don't need to buy or build a datacenter. There's three ways to get servers: owning, renting space, or renting servers. Owning Dedicate a room you can put raised floor into Get two power domains coming into it Get ...


13

Yes, it's called colocation and you can find thousands of companies who will happily do it for you.


11

Yes, you can run this server happily in under 2.5 Amps total... I can show you real-life utilization for that server platform/model. Watts = Amps x Volts Your power regulator and power supply efficiency mode settings will have an impact, but the example I give below is from one of my co-located ProLiant DL360 G7 systems with 96GB RAM, 2 x X5660 CPUs, 4 x ...


10

Typically, co-location providers build out the rack electrical on-demand to customer specifications. Due to the variances in provisioning and client requirements, it doesn't make sense to waste the effort of pre-provisioning power until the rack space is sold. New racks... no power feeds (I had to wait 12 hours for Union electricians) With power!! You ...


10

I would recommend installing a software firewall like iptables on the servers whether or not you have a hardware firewall. The more layers of protection you have, whether to provide more walls for an attacker or to provide more places that someone would have to do something silly to allow an attacker in, the better. That said, I would generally prefer to ...


10

With co-location you are basically renting 3 things: Space to put your machine (1U, 2U, shelf, rack, cage sq feet, etc) Electricity to power your machine one (measured in Amps) Network to connect your machine to the internet or other network (depends, usually measured in mbps) With most colocation (colo) providers, you are responsible for your own ...


10

Your next best bet to physical locality would be to position yourself with a provider that has good network connectivity to Amazon's US networks. This is what public peering exchanges exist for. Based on Amazon's PeeringDB info it seems that their AWS services have a strong presence in Seattle and Palo Alto, and that they peer on PAIX and SIX. So another ...


9

The quick ghetto option is what you mention above - have your datacenter run a POTS line to your rack & hang a $10 Radio Shack phone off it (if you've already got an emergency modem for serial console use you can just steal that line, which is what I usually do :-) The price for a POTS cross-connect varies a lot though, and it's usually an additional ...


9

The CentOS installer (anaconda) that ships with the PXE images includes a VNC server, so you can alter your grub config to boot the CentOS installer, passing the answers to the pre-stage 2 installer questions on the grub line, reboot and then VNC to the installer. Now, if my memory serves me correctly, from within that installer you should be able to drop ...


9

Yes, blades are dense. :) You need to use a power budgeting tool to determine maximum power draw of your particular hardware configuration. Your reseller should be helping you with this. (since that's what I do :) Multiple power supplies can have quite a few possible scenarios: N+N configuration: Maximum power draw of N×Wattage power. N+1 configuration: ...


8

It basically means throwing away the top 5% of samples of the bandwidth used above the 20-megabit/second contract rate... This is an unmetered link, so you can use 100 megabits/second when you need it... but the average usage needs to be below 20 megabit/second. The purpose is to determine your realistic and sustained usage pattern. This is also described ...


7

Generically, it means you'll be connected to a 1-Gigabit switch port. In the context of data centers and co-location, this means that the co-location facility will be providing a 1Gbps uplink port to your server/networking equipment. This also means that you'll probably have burstable bandwidth to the internet of 1Gbps, but still subject to ...


7

Running dual-PSU servers in a balanced power distribution mode doesn't mean that they each use exactly 50% of the power that a single PSU would use. It's usually horribly inefficient to balance the load. I don't have the exact numbers, but afaik it's about a 20% waste in power. However - running them in balanced mode and then push each PDU up to 80% is ...


7

Well, a lot will obviously depend on the specifics of the case, but you should keep in mind that with physical access to the machine, they can practically do anything they want anyway. The common solution for this is to give them a dedicated maintenance account that has root rights via sudo. Then you can give them the pw when you want them to have root ...


6

Purchase a Kill-a-watt meter and measure your power in watts and KVA. This device will allow you to measure amps directly. Run the server for a while and record the highest amp draw. That would be the number I would use for the server amp requirements.


6

If you're using linux, check out the Linux Advanced Routing and Traffic Control HOWTO for an introduction on how to use tc and other tools to perform traffic shaping and qos on your link. There are management systems for tc which abstract away some of the pain, such as MasterShaper and WonderShaper. I've not used either of those, and wondershaper appears to ...


6

You can use [re]nice to adjust a process' priority - this won't "limit" things per-se but it will let other operations on the server continue to run. The command renice will change the priority of a running process From man renice "Useful priorities are: 20 (the affected processes will run only when nothing else in the system wants to), 0 (the ‘‘base’’ ...


6

I have successfully gotten all the way through rm -rf --no-preserve-root / without the system crashing first, and without anything being left on the drive.


6

Before you destroy the OS you could remove anything sensitive and zerofill (using dd if=/dev/zero of=justabigfile). And I believe most systems will survive a dd to a running system long enough to overwrite the entire disk. There is no way back if it doesn't, of course.


6

Yes for some protocols. No for others. The answer is it depends on what kind of traffic is "normal" for your environment. Think about web browsing (and let's just agree for a moment that it's representative of normal internet traffic for say an office): I want to look at this question, so I connect to serverfault.com and go GET questions/361329 ...


6

The Dell R200 has a 100 - 240V auto-sensing power supply. This means you can use the server anywhere in Europe (with the correct power plug). Just plug it in and it will adjust automatically to the voltage. The amp usage will be approximately the half of your current amp usage in the US. Because the power usage of your server will be the same and P = U * I ...


6

The technology you are looking for is called Anycast. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anycast Anycast is a network addressing and routing methodology in which datagrams from a single sender are routed to the topologically nearest node in a group of potential receivers, though it may be sent to several nodes, all identified by the same destination ...


6

There is a vast difference between the maximum rated power consumption a supply can handle before it burns out the fuses and the actual current a server will draw. HP provides a power calculator where you can add the components that will be added to your specific configuration and you'll get the "correct" peak power consumption. Your power hookup needs ...


6

Single rack power failure is more common than most of the other concerns you've listed: A single PDU strip popping or a circuit getting overloaded... I've had that happen a handful of times, but none of the other issues you listed. Ideally your 'HA' solution uses two different datacenters. (eg. two zones in a AWS region)


5

Yes, this should be full-duplex bandwidth... But check the terms of the offer to make sure that language is there. Make sure you understand the billing metrics. For instance, unmetered and burstable/95th percentile are vastly different and need to be planned for... Also see: What does it mean - to get billed to the 95th percentile at $x.xx per meg?


5

One of the rules of the 10 immutable laws of security states If a bad guy has unrestricted physical access to your computer, it's not your computer anymore. Since the staff at a colocation center has unlimited physical access you pretty much have to concede that they can do very bad things if so desired. The only answer here isn't a technological one but ...


5

Yep - say exactly this to them; "I'm weighing the options versus building out in a cloud platform. We are REALLY low bandwidth and power. There's a total of six hosts for the total operation. You can assume we use <= 10 amps of power and <= 2Mbps 95th percentile." Then tell them how much you want to pay - they'll bite your arm off. With lots of ...


5

Does anybody know of a better way of connecting to this single server? Yeah. Use ssh. IPSEC or a single-point VPN would be total overkill in my opinion. There are not many (in fact there are currently no known) vulnerabilities in a properly configured OpenSSH setup, and nearly everybody is using SSH (most of us OpenSSH), so it's had a pretty ...


5

There isn't enough detail here. The issues to think about with cloud based hosting are: privacy/ownership issues - is it OK that someone else has legal ownership of your data? The implication being that currently (just like the phone company or any other service provider) should there be a subpoena issued for that data you have no right to be notified or ...



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