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10

RFC 1034 described the CNAME record, originally. There may be some RFCs that obselete it, but I'm not sure off the top of my head.


6

There are specific systems that internally use DVDs and migrate the data to new media every so often. Look up digital preservation. Since the storage requirements rise pretty quickly, it is advisable to switch to a newer, bigger type of media every few years anyways. Assuming you get the data in paper form, you need to: List the data at mail entry. ...


5

Keeping the data in a format like PDF is probably safe, because there are Free tools to read it. The volume of data you're talking about is fairly small (1,200 pages / year) so even at a 300 dpi scan resolution you're only talking about tens of gigabytes per year. The physical storage device problem is never going to go away, though. Whatever media you use ...


5

Next time, have a look at Wikipedia first, it is in the first sentence after the toc there.


5

OpenSSL got FIPS-140-2 certified a while ago; it requires you to use a particular version and build of OpenSSL, but if you really need the certification, then you're probably up the creek in a variety of other ways, too. See http://www.openssl.org/docs/fips/UserGuide-1.1.1.pdf for all the gory details.


5

Rule #1: Ignore (politely) anyone that isn't paying for the archive. All of the above answers are excellent but they leave out one thing: The important thing is "who pays for this?" The department that pays for it has requirements: how fast data can be restored, length of time to hold the data, security requirements, etc. Other people might have "helpful ...


5

Backups are there to restore things to the way they were at a previous point in time. We do backups to restore service, and usually don't think much about the underlying data. Archives are very data focused, so you really need to think about things like classification and the information life-cycle. Much like software development, deep understanding of the ...


4

Disclaimer - I work for a hosting provider that is SAS 70 type II compliant and a PCI DSS validated service provider. PCI DSS is a specific set of technical requirements that must be met. SAS 70 is an audit of your controls and procedures.


4

I'd suggest not trying to solve AWS's problem yourself. Ask your auditor if he will accept a SAS 70 Type 2 audit report of AWS regarding PCI compliance: this means that an external auditor audits AWS for PCI security concerning AWS clients and issues a report. Your auditor then basically rubberstamps it. If the auditor isn't willing to accept this report, ...


4

Just create a user account that is member of the Domain users group. That account won´t have any write permissions on the other objects of the directory except for itself. If you need some more advance service accounts, Windows 2008 R2 has something called Managed Service Accounts. I have never used them but it won´t hurt to have a look at them: ...


3

First, when you say 40 admin level accounts I'm going to assume you mean Domain Admin. 40 of these type of accounts is dangerous for so many reasons that I'm sure you can already guess. What I would recommend as the first thing to do would be to open the Domain Admin, Enterprise Admin, and Schema Admin groups in Active Directory. Opening these groups up ...


3

I think Amazon's new Glacier service is an interesting offering in this space. Amazon Glacier is optimized for data that is infrequently accessed and for which retrieval times of several hours are suitable. With Amazon Glacier, customers can reliably store large or small amounts of data for as little as $0.01 per gigabyte per month, a significant savings ...


3

Obviously not applicable to your current situation with 2003, but Exchange 2010 has a moderation feature. See here.


3

Our solution: Scan to PDF -> Backup to Tape We have a document scanner, does ~30 pages/min and produces OCRed PDF files. We back those up to Tape (LTO4 specifically) which has a shelf life of 50 to 100 years (finding a tape drive might be difficult in the time frame, but there are data recovery places that will still recover 8" floppy disks around).


2

I don't think they regulate that, presumably the office would have downtime procedures for capturing records on paper that would later be entered in the system after the upgrade is complete. HIPAA doesn't care if the system is up or not, just that you can produce the records when required, and that they are kept securely.


2

Wow, my sympathies.... It all sounds reasonable, but I can't tell you whether it will stand up to a BSA (Business Software Alliance) or MS Licensing Audit. Talk to your software resellers about your situation and see what they can offer, and talk to your organization's laywers. My take, I am not a laywer Since virtualization licensing only applies to ...


2

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (and soon 6) have a number of FIPS 140-2 certified modules: http://www.redhat.com/solutions/industry/government/certifications.html


2

Why not pass your SMTP traffic through a Linux server and use and SMTP server such as Exim configured with a shadow transport and router: Router: T_SHADOW_ALL: debug_print = "R: shadow delivery" driver = accept transport = SHADOW_DELIVERY # see below unseen # don't stop at this router Transport: SHADOW_DELIVERY: ...


2

Step one, Backup: OCR the documents, and then re-arrange all the words into a series of novels about the Catholic Church, Opus Dei and Templars. You should have enough input data for about 10 novels, and about one more every year or so forever. Maintain a lookup table which holds the words original location in the source documents (in source order), and it's ...


2

You can take a look at Send If Approved from MAPILab. It's an Outlook plugin MAPILab - Send If Approved Component


2

I'm in 2 minds on this one... The IT Manager in me says: If there's really nothing out there that suits your needs, even with some minor modifications, and the business will support you in writing and maintaining your own, then go for it. But really make sure there's nothing else out there that can do it for you. No sense reinventing the wheel if all you ...


2

Assuming a geographic "event" that affects the business office you want the DC to be far enough away so that it isn't affected by the same geographic "event" that would cause the business information systems/assets to also be lost or become unavailable. This would allow the business to set up a "business continuity/disaster recovery" office that could then ...


2

I've deployed NetMRI for this at a large enterprise (100s of networking devices): http://www.infoblox.com/en/products/netmri.html It was awe inspiring what it would detect and the policy manager in it was very very powerful. The learning curve on it was a bit steep, but once you set it up, it alerted us about problems before they would affect users and ...


2

I haven't used chef, but I have used cfengine quite a bit. So while I don't have specific advice for your environment, I can tell you in general how I've handled it. I expect that you can do something similar with chef, puppet, or whatever. To start, let me say that in my opinion, if you're using chef (or any other configuration management package) to ...


2

I'm going to recommend you take a look at Amazon Glacier. It's 1 cent per month, per gigabyte that you want to store. So unless your logs are massive, there shouldn't be a massive cost problem. The main reason I'm telling you this is because, from their FAQ: Q: Can I see what archives I have stored in Amazon Glacier? Yes. Although you will need to ...


1

Consider trusted timestamps. It might be enough to use openssl ts to sign the logfile hashes.


1

Bit too early to buy but it seems like HDS have come up with a permanent data storage mechanism based on quartz - take a READ.


1

Barracuda Networks has a Mail Archiver 1U rack-mounted appliance. It's pretty powerful if I recall the demo correctly and has won some awards.


1

For SMS archiving I'm familiar with Dexrex's software - It seemed to work pretty well and may do what you want (it basically consolidates SMS/MMS messages and emails them to a specified address -- Double Win in that your users get an email-record of their SMS conversations and you get it archived by virtue of it becoming an email. I've got nothin' for you ...



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