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exponential back-off http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exponential_backoff


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Back in the elder days of the 80's and early 90's, when such addresses were actually configurable for some network network protocols, the addresses were set by a variety of means. In some cases DIP switches on the network card were used to configure the significant bits; if a change was needed the Computer Technician had to pop open the chassis and change ...


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The multicast address is chosen arbitrarily out of the 239.0.0.0/8 range (if the application is enterprise-internal, at least). It is then configured on the source(s) and all subscribers. So, there is in general no "directory service" within the network, it relies on human interaction, to configure the applications correctly.


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First off let me state that multicasting is evil. It is extremely hard to set up and really tricky to troubleshoot effectively. That being said, I will attempt to answer your question. The sender chooses what multicast IP address that it uses to send traffic on. The reserved range of multicast IP addresses is 224.0.0.0 through 239.255.255.255. Most ISPs ...


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Windows Media Services has the option of broadcasting live events over multicast. As Lloyd Baker pointed out, this is something that ends up being local to a network. On our University network we would multicast things like Commencement and speeches by the President, which would allow anyone on the network to tune in (which could be thousands) without ...


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2 ^ 5 - 2 = 30 You have an 8 bit subnett (the last 0 in the subnett mask) 8 -3 = 5 The -2 is to remove the broadcast and subnett mask addresses The answer is 30


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It is possible to manufacture devices that are programmable only once. Most allow multiple configurations though. In the case of the hardware MAC address, it's a very bad idea to fiddle with it. Each manufacturer has a block (range) that they are assigned and they allocate from. If you set a device randomly, you could end up with 2 devices on the network ...



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