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7

I'm in a similar boat. With a setup the size of yours, there's really not a lot you can do to reduce costs purely from an IT perspective. Sure you can turn machines off and save a couple bucks -- it's a good thing to do -- but it's not going to make a drastic difference. And you might be cautious when moving to low consumption power supplies, make sure to ...


6

Why upgrade? are you having problems with the current setup? are there new requirements? 3-5 yr old machines are just fine for web browsing. If the HDD's start going, or you'd like to lower maintenance overheard then switch to a linux live CD distro that's a web kiosk. Firefox kiosk plug-in. Easy to setup LiveKiosk distro. Make sure that the apps work ...


5

We went through a similar deal and ended up with "social justice" if that's even a catchphrase. We had no desire to deal with extensive logging/reporting or the time it would take to arrest and convict someone of printer abuse. So...we ended up doing the following: Put signs on all of the printers that stated "Think Green and control spending! Please ...


5

I found their support options that explain what "standard support" gets you. They appear to be reselling Amazon EC2 with added pre-configuration and support for Ruby on Rails applications, so the "extra large" probably refers to Amazon's Extra Large, which means 15 GB of RAM, 8 "compute units" and 1690GB of storage. My guess is that your client got what he ...


4

Sometimes the appliance comes with specialized hardware that I'd have no possibility of duplicating, such as with the F5 BigIP hardware load-balancers. In those cases, the appliance is well worth the effort. The Cisco 6509 in our DC is a whonking big appliance with very specialized hardware, and I wouldn't dream of replacing that with software/hardware I can ...


4

Extensive studies show that on average, a production server utilizes only about 10~20% of its available resources (CPU, memory, disk). The primary reason for this is simple: if you don't allow for headroom for future growth or daily or periodic traffic bursts, the system will suffer performance degradation. However, if you can collect 5 or 10 of these ...


4

You seem to have hit the nail on the head - 1 VM host running say 8 VM's will likely be cheaper and much smaller than the 8 seperate machines. Don't forget the significant cost of extended (and maybe further extending of) warranties. Also if this saves purchasing various brand/generations of servers, this saves you familiarising yourself with the varying ...


4

Cloud computing is also called "utility computing", and you can leverage that analogy for your own analysis. We've done our own analysis of the role of cloud services in providing computing services and yes, the cost is rather high. Especially for 24/7/365 service. A SaaS stack is going to have a certain number of machines always running just to keep the ...


3

I rarely buy RHEL support. I have worked in environments where all systems were fully-paid RHEL and others where thousands of systems were running the license-free CentOS variant. The maintenance and management overhead was slightly higher with paid Red Hat. There was a bit more headache in managing licenses and entitlements and delays in deployment. Again, ...


3

You are probably spending more on software licensing than anything, on a yearly basis. I would push your vendors hard to get the best pricing. Also, look at open source alternatives for office software. And depending on how many mail users you have, hosted exchange or even something like Google Apps for business could be a cost effective alternative. We have ...


2

That does seem very expensive, but of course it's a free market and if he's happy to pay that bill they're under no obligation to suggest he move or change supplier to save money. What I would say is that unless the application is particularly complex there's no need for him to have the 'extra large' service - moving hosts can be time consuming, complex and ...


2

In terms of immediate performance gains, like gravyface mentioned, I wouldn't expect a huge gain, however separating the your database and application onto two servers gives you a large amount of flexibility when it comes to scaling your environment in the future, since you have the ability to grow resources for either the application or the database as ...


1

In theory such a technique would greatly reduce bandwidth costs, however it would also increase CPU costs. I suggest you have a look at Rsync and see how this tool has solved this problem without the use of hash directories. Also given specific data patters it is possible to have hash collisions where two files would have the exact same MD5 hash. This ...


1

Desktops can now be virtualized with (for example) VMWare View and Teradici PCoIP zero clients. While the zero clients are less expensive than a traditional PC, you will still need high-end servers, a SAN, etc. just to get started. Therefore, from a cost perspective, you need to virtualize a lot of desktops just to break even. However, very large ...


1

I think that you should be looking into a MPS solution probably the best for your environment as I have read would be Papercut (MF if you have MFP's or NG if you dont). This package allows you to quota users, monitor trends in print, restrict certain documents to mono etc. It is a very very powerful utility which will without doubt reduce your spend on ...


1

If it's a tool you're looking for, I can recommend PyKota; I used it to implement printing quotas in a public school environment. It's GPL and has commercial support.


1

Keep in mind that Engine Yard does managed application hosting rather than just hosting. They are a bit like Heroku. They offer premium support for the whole stack as well as hosting. If you're running a single server that isn't terribly complicated, having Engine Yard manage it is overkill.


1

Pros: you get to ignore the man behind the curtain the only way to use some specialized hardware (routers, etc) Cost - in the age of integration and mass production, appliance hardware can be essentially 'bummed' down to a bare minimum BOM and then mass produced, losing an order of magnitude in price along the way. See: wifi routers Cons: ...


1

Set up a test network and see if you get on with http://www.ltsp.org/. http://www.nomachine.com/ is also a great alternative. Also don't rule out serving many desktops from one piece of hardware. http://linuxgazette.net/124/smith.html it's a little harder to configure, but could be a lot of fun. Saves energy bills too! It allows diskless clients so you ...



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