Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Not considerable enough to make an impact. The adjustments are more for licensing. For example, Windows Server is licensed per processor slot, so you'd pay more to have 1 core and 4 CPUs than to have 1 CPU and 4 cores. Same goes with other products whose costs quickly rise with more processors (looking at you, Oracle).


6

A good answer to your question is much too complicated for SF. A short answer would be "yes", Linux and most modern OSes balance processes that are ready to run across available processors very efficiently. There are techniques to modify how processes are allocated to resources, including changing schedulers are assigning processes to particular processors, ...


4

Short answer: Probably none that you would notice. Long answer: Maybe. The issue that comes to my mind first and foremost is that modern CPUs operate much faster than the main memory they use. This is the primary reason why NUMA (non-uniform memory access) was invented. CPUs on the same die (ex. two cores on the same chip) would share the same NUMA node... ...


3

While there shouldn't be a difference here, my benchmarks have shown a slight (but clean nonetheless) performance increase in Windows guests when using single core multi-socket emulation (e.g. 4 vCPUs are mapped as 4 sockets, single core, single thread). No visible difference in Linux guests though. Tests were done on KVM, using Windows 2003R2 and 2008R2 ...


2

Linux is primarily concerned with maximizing CPU utilization by load balancing the threads over all available cores. This dosen't mean to say that Linux arbitrarily decides to place certain threads on certain cores but it uses a process scheduling algorithm to decide what is the most efficient way to distribute the threads over all the cores. So the answer ...


2

There's no major difference here. The main purpose of the cores/socket designation is to provide options for software that may have runtime or licensing requirements based on the number of "physical" sockets or CPU cores (cough, databases...) There's no significant performance difference between multiple cores on one socket versus a combination of multiple ...


1

Both E7300(Tigerton) and E7400(Dunnington) series won't work in IBM x346. The VRM delivered with these cpu's won't even fit in the slot and the belonging heathsinks also won't fit since the retention module on the mainboard is different. The only thing that fits are the cpu's itself since the socket is the same but it will overheat with the original x346 ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible