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1

Yes, it is possible to use IPMI update the BIOS, UEFI, FPGA or any EPROM that is accessible using IPMI. To do this the server must implement the PICMG HPM.1 standard with uses IPMI as the transport between the device containing the source BIOS image and the target server that will receive the BIOS. If your server does not implement HPM.1 then it must be a ...


1

Removing unused modules sometimes has the opposite effect as the server is then not able to cache effectively for example, but assuming this is not the problem, the other issue I think might be happening is that you may be low on memory and therefore the so called "disk thrashing" (high IO) occurs, this is very possible specially on a virtual host. A ...


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Your network utilization increased at the same time, which indicates you are receiving more requests on this server, or more demanding ones with larger responses. If you haven't changed your configuration, this doesn't necessarily indicate something is wrong. You are probably just getting more traffic.


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coreinfo.exe from Sysinternals Suite. coreinfo.exe | find "NX"


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The general answer is "yes", but you need to be careful. The issue is not so much in mixing different sizes of RAM (I was doing that here for a while on a very similar motherboard), but with other properties of the RAM. Your motherboard manual (you can download that from SuperMicro here if you don't have it) has a table showing the limitations. The table ...


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I have been doing some looking around and it seems the X5460 would be better than the X5472, it has a faster clock speed although the FSB is lower. Performance is better on the X5460 http://www.cpu-world.com/Compare/854/Intel_Xeon_X5460_vs_Intel_Xeon_X5472.html


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Here's how to get detail on a service without any external tools on Windows 7 and 8: Open the Resource Monitor: Open Task Manager and click on the Performance tab Click on "Open Resource Monitor" at the bottom Show Service Detail: Click on the "CPU" tab Select the service you want under "Processes" (yes, it includes services aswell) Now you can see ...


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Other people already gave a good explanation on the advantages and disadvantages of server hardware vs. desktop hardware; however, there is another thing to point out here: you are going from 4 cores to 8. This means you'll get a much better response when running concurrent (and/or multithreaded) CPU-intensive applications. Of course, if this is not your use ...


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All else being roughly equal, a processor is a processor. "Server" processors tend to have larger caches which is useful for switching among many tasks, but does less with single-threaded processing. What processor is going to give an edge is going to be highly dependent on the load you're placing on the processor. The Passmark score is going to be a good ...


2

In general server-grade hardware will perform better than desktop-grade equivalents when under load from multiple processes (e.g. running several services serving requests, hosting multiple users, etc). For day to day desktop usage server hardware won't necessarily perform any better, and can underperform. However, server hardware typically is less error ...


3

In the comparison there are 6(12 virtual) additional cores, in your test you have the same number of cores. You are increasing the speed by just 7% and getting 11% more work done, seems like a decent improvement to me.


2

I would say : 1) This is, IMHO, a false positive question : unused ports should be blocked by default. Only used ports should be opened. 2) Dropping or Accepting is not what will affect firewall CPU performance : it is more the total rules it has to parse, from the filter table, before taking a decision : place most used access rules at the beginning of ...



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