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If any of your servers send email and you've specified IP addresses in your SPF records, you'll need to look into changing.


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First, we don't know what you're moving or what you mean by "clean". But if this is a simple website or even dynamic sites (except data-driven applications since we need to consider your database), you can simply point your DNS from the old IP to the IP of your machine in the new data center. It will work with limited to no downtime at all. Granting that ...


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Having been in the DDoS defense industry, this is commonly referred to as 'collateral damage' when unintended targets at the same data center gets taken down. A good datacenter operator will automatically kick in protective mechanisms like blackholing routes for the intended target in order to save everyone else hosted at the datacenter, but you'll be ...


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You simply need DDoS protection from ISP. This is an optional service, by which the ISP tries to monitor attacks and re-route any DDoS to blackhole. Another datacenter cannot protect you from DDoS that is targeted at your service.


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(Some people are hard to please...) These are likely system exhaust vents and fit into the total design of the product. Please understand that the system is designed and optimized for rack mounting in a proper enclosure with separation between hot and cold air aisle. These servers are designed to be placed in adjacent rack units, and there's a small gap ...


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Servers aren't really intended to be stacked directly on top of each other but for mounting in a 19'' cabinet. Typically there they don't quite touch and those vent holes won't be (completely) closed off. For their actual purpose, I can only guess... Either to allow airflow and prevent excessive pressure differences when the main intake and outflow aren't ...


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Those holes are IMHO there to allow the air to keep venting in the event a person fills the expansion slots. Cards in expansion slots don't have vent holes so each care is removing venting real estate. Plus, if you are racking properly, the servers shouldn't actually touch each other. Granted the gap is small but it's enough to allow air to pass through ...


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Highly recommend The Practice of Cloud System Administration, goes over some of this in great detail. Here we have 3 levels of monitoring End to End (oh crap something is wrong) Per service/API (oh crap member of SQL cluster is down, API is responding slow or with something other than a 200/300 HTTP code etc) APM - What piece of code etc is slow, error ...



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