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18

You can also use File -> Export -> Export OVF template and then import it. Last time I tried it, i think this does preserve the vmdk format. Not so sure now as it has been quite some time.


13

Just went through finding a way to do this myself. Here's a, hopefully, easy to follow guide on how to move your VM to a new datastore while preserving thin provisioning during the transfer (thus also reducing transfer times): Step by step guide using vmkfstools in the CLI Power off VM (Optional) Consolidate snapshots if needed. Remove VM from vCenter ...


12

BINGO!!! Alright, here is how this was resolved: I referenced this artice for unmounting the datastore, https://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2004605 Step 1: Manually unmount the datastore from the host with this command: esxcli storage filesystem unmount [-u UUID | -l label | -p path ] In ...


9

How can I know, but looking in the datastore folder, if the VM is in the inventory or not? You can't. We could do with knowing what your actual problem here is, for instance if you have have a seriously large number of files hanging around in a DS and you don't know if they're running then simply SvMotioning the running ones to a different DS will leave ...


8

Microsoft has a tool called SQLIO which will push the IO to the limit. Just build a Windows VM with a disk on the correct data store and run SQLIO. Don't let the name fool you, it doesn't actually require SQL to be installed (it doesn't have anything to do with SQL, it was just built by the SQL team).


7

Sure - but it can only be done with the VM running of you have licensing that allows for Storage VMotion. Otherwise, you'll shut the VM down and unregister it ("remove from inventory"), then in the datastore browser select the VM's directory and select the "move" option (the little paper with an arrow) in the top panel. Once that completes, find the VM in ...


6

You should try running the Open Source VMFS driver to see if that lets you do what you need.


6

Take a look at all of the datastores visible to the host (in vSphere, select the host > Configuration tab > Storage). Are any of the datastores full or very close to it? The swap file may be located on a full datastore even if the VM is on another datastore and if the host cannot create the swap file, the VM will not boot. EDIT: Right-click the VM and go ...


6

Check out this answer. The same logic applies in your situation, namely this quotation: It's called "Converter" but it should really be called "All-Purpose OS Data Mover." Doesn't roll off the tongue quite as nicely, though. The only difference is that the source and destination hosts will be the same, but the datastores will differ. This does mean ...


6

This tip worked for me in the past, if you can disable ATS-Only: Cannot mount the VMFS5 datastore when using storage encryption appliances (2030416) I guess no VM are up in your case, but they need to be close to be able to run the command. Some storage encryption appliances may block certain SCSI commands, including ATS commands, sent from ESXi ...


5

Well, it works in their case because for a normal VM snapshot, you need to keep extra space free on the datastore to house the data difference between the snapshot and the base; with their tools, it has the storage handle that instead. Not sure if it's snapshotting the whole LUN in the storage when it does this - if that is the case, then that would explain ...


5

Why not buy an inexpensive NAS from QNAP? For $500 bucks you can get a 4-bay RAID unit with Jumbo Frames, iSCSI, CIFS/SMB, NFS, FTP, etc. That way, there's a graceful transition with no risk of data loss or disruption: just load it up with disks (SATA's are fine for what you're doing), get it on the network, do some nightly rsyncs until you have a ...


5

Can't be done sorry, as you say ESXi is happy to boot from a USB disk but won't allow a datastore to be created on one - nor should it, using one as such is an appalling idea. In fact your question history has interested me since you joined, you seem to ask lots of unusual questions that give the impression you've not received any training or read any ...


5

There's no much point in using RDM these days unless your VM is sort of a "controller" VM and it uses ZFS or similar to aggregate multiple individual physical disks into single unified namespace. Think about Nutanix for example. For all other cases VMDK is just as well I/O performing as RDM but RDM-x doesn't support at least some nice features and has issues ...


4

Buy a new drive then, using a linux boot disk, dd the old drive (from USB) to the new drive: dd if=/dev/sd<olddrive> of=/dev/sd<newdrive> Because VMFS, the ESXi filesytem, is proprietary, you will not be able to find any drivers, or mount the drive to copy your vmdk files. This may change, and you can use adapters, but your best bet is to ...


4

You can't do this sorry, not with v4 as it's a limitation of SCSI-2/VMFS3 (version 5 however changes things a lot ;) ). Just go back and represent your LUNs as 2TB one and extent them if required, you're still limited to 2TB vmdk's anyway so it's a little pointless doing extent'ed DS's anyway really. If it's any consolation I limit my DS's to 500GB anyway to ...


3

In clarification of Shane's answer - you would need to have a vCenter Server in order to do what you desire (without the need of manually moving files between the data stores). My clients had independent ESXi instances in place and then opted to move their data to a SAN. If you don't want to deal with downtime (and you don't have an existing vCenter ...


3

People are currently running VM densities of 20-40 VMs per datastore and not having IO problems, to address one of your concerens. I play ultra cautious, I feel, and keep ~10-15 and have no IO latency/CPU ready problems. VMware is moving towards larger datastores to make fore easier management so really this is working in direct opposition to where the ...


3

If your task is to move content of the datastore to the new LUN then shutting down VMs, unregistering them, and copying files using vsphere client ( or any other apporpriate method) from old LUN to new LUN , then reregistering VMs using .vmx files again. If you cannot afford a downtime, the process becomes more complicated and depends on your requirements.


3

From your Inventory view in the VI Client, select your ESX Host, select the Configuration Tab, Select Storage and then click on the Add Storage link just above the upper right* side of the Datastores summary pane. Once in that just follow the wizard for adding a new Disk\LUN. Depending on how you've added the new drive and what it is you may need to go to ...


3

Configuration Maximums. Looks like 256 VMFS volumes per host max. And then: NFS-attached, limit of 64 FC attached, limit of 256 iSCSI attached, limit of 256


3

You cannot share the datastore from ESXi directly. You'll need to create a VM, allocate disk to it, and then share the storage out from there. As an aside, those two 2TB drives you have really ought to be configured in a RAID 1 set. You're asking to put yourself (and those who are dependent on this server) in a world of hurt if you leave them as standalone ...


3

Actually just create the folder at the target destination, then copy the files in the folder from the source and it will stay thin. If you copy the folder it will convert from thin to thick..


3

The VMware SDK offers very many complex ways to assess you VMware/vSphere server. If you know Perl, have a look at the munin plugin for VMware. Around line 308 you can see that the datastore performance data (how much is used, committed, unshared) per VM is read out. In the loop above that, the metrics per datastore are acquired. With a little modification ...


3

SImply said your problem is: (two SATA disks on RAID 1). Turn it how you like, but two likely very slow discs are 2 very slow discs and nothing except heavy caching will work around it. You have a small IOPS budget right there and the only thin that can fix that is having a larger one. Example - using Raid 10 with 8-10 discs will give you a lot more ...


3

I'd say don't do it on the host directly. ESXi's SSH interface isn't really meant for this sort of thing and leaving the service and shell enabled will trigger alarms and warnings to always appear in the clients. Yes, those alarms can be disabled, but they're there for a reason. The approach I would take depends on the system from which you're planning to ...


3

The sDRS schedules are regular vCenter scheduled tasks. There are few blog posts available on how to list these with PowerCLI, e.g. here: https://virtualbyte.wordpress.com/2014/09/05/retrieve-vcenter-scheduled-task-with-powercli/ http://rvdnieuwendijk.com/2013/01/19/get-vmware-vcenter-scheduled-tasks-with-powercli/ I personally like this one liner from the ...


3

Hmmm, This is not a common thing to do. Why would you be concerned about datastore files if you're not having a space issue or investigating bad behavior/performance? (30 ESXi hosts isn't a modest environment either) View from your storage array (assuming shared storage). View from a host that can see the datastores. Heck, a well-crafted find from the ...


3

A good solution for this would be to use VMware's Storage Policy-Based Management with tags. There may be vendor specific capabilities that you could also take advantage of but as tags are vendor agnostic I'll use those to explain how policies can be leveraged. A minimal approach would be: Create a tag category (storage-performance) with two tags (...


2

If you really want a fresh store just delete the databases and transaction log files (the contents of the MDBDATA folder) and start the information store. It will create a new, empty database. Be sure this is what you want before you do it.



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