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8

While the slow client is transmitting data, due to CSMA-CA, no other client can transmit. A slow client will take significantly longer to transmit its packet of data than a fast client. Similarly while the AP is talking to a slow client all other wireless devices on that channel will have to wait for their turn. The slower the device the longer that the ...


7

DD-WRT is nice for routing, but if your replacing a firewall, I would lean towards pfSense or Endian as a firewall solution instead of a router with firewall capabilities.


6

We have used DDWRT for over a year now and have never had an prob with it. We run it on a WRT54G that is on and open to the public 24/7. I may have had to restart it 3 times in the last year or so. We frequently have 15-25 wireless users. There is plenty of support for DDWRT online and I would definitely recommend it. If you have read anything about it ...


6

I don't think you can set it up where DD-WRT calls CloudFlare directly. The way I have it configured is to have DD-WRT call a PHP script on a remote web server, which then detects the client IP and sends the update request to CloudFlare via their API. DD-WRT DDNS settings DDNS Service: Custom DYNDNS Server: <yourserver.com> Username: <anything> ...


6

Your configuration is not that complex. You really don't need "prosumer" NAT router/firewall boxes if you don't want them. What you DO need is proper isolation of your "public" and "intranet" networks -- you don't really have that here (Public devices can't hit your intranet's internal IPs, but they can see all of its traffic, and your intranet can hit ...


5

Yes. Generally speaking, a G-only network is about three times faster than a mixed B/G network. Please see the following: What do I need to transform my network from Ethernet to WiFi? From the Cisco White Paper Capacity Coverage & Deployment Considerations for IEEE 802.11g "When 802.11b clients are associated to an 802.11g access point, the ...


5

I've had my eye on CoovaChilli for a while, it's an OpenWRT only fork of ChilliSpot which also runs on regular computers. Coova offers commercial support if you need it.


5

I can't rule out the possibility of doing it but I can make some points against it. The recommended process (strongly reiterated by DD-WRT) involves a series of 'hard' resets that involve power cycling while holding down the physical reset button on the router. Tricky to do remotely :) Saved settings for one version of the firmware should NEVER be used ...


5

I would imagine that if you checked most of those connections will be on port 80 and in a TIME_WAIT state. TIME_WAIT is a state where connections could conceivably be re-used without making a new TCP between servers, so it can help reduce load. So basically your router is saving a tcp socket for later use to the same site.


4

We use them everywhere, I think we got about a hundred used in production, from simple firewalls to asterix nodes. We have standardized on ASUS WL-500GP hardware. We have developed some scripts in-house to handle upgrades and "config" snapshots. The only thing we really miss is accelerated crypto for OpenVPN.


4

This is a routing question, so using iptables may not suitable. Here we will use iproute2, which, fortunately, included with DD-WRT. Suppose 1.1.1.1 is the IP address of the default gateway of the DD-WRT (you have to figure it out, may be by ways of disable OpenVPN so that the default gateway will be set to normal and issue a route -n command to see the ...


3

Well, yes and no. The Dyndns address is an external address: that's the whole point. It points to your external interface, the one out there on teh interwebs, not your internal one on your nice safe lan. So if something from your internal network is pointed at that address, it goes out, turns around, and comes back in. That's the only way it knows to get ...


3

You want to put the router between your gateway and the switch as mentioned. In this typical setup, all traffic between the internet and your local network runs through the router and gateway, which allows you to control the traffic using either device. internets---------[gateway]---------[router]------[switch]---local network 192.168.0.1 ...


3

Try using syslog-ng. I ran into a number of problems with syslogd on openwrt. I suspect you are running into the similar problems. See my documentation on using syslog-ng with openwrt. My logging server is Ubuntu running rsyslogd. Alternatively, you should be able to do the required changes on the logging server using syslog-ng to rerwrite the log ...


3

You should really consider pfsense which is a embedded distribution that does FW/Router and captive portal. It is extremely simple to use and works great.


3

We use OpenWRT at work, both in the office and DC. It'll handle as many machines as your wireless bandwidth will support, as far as I can tell. I don't know how long we've been using it, it was here when I got here.


3

Are you looking to do this through a single wireless router or through multiple access points? Many routers are multi-SSID as well as DMZ capable if that's what you want. I would look around for some higher end SOHO boxes like the one's from DrayTek. I have had good luck with them in the past. If you already have the LAN set up with a separate subnet for ...


3

I would strongly suggest putting guests on their own subnet with strictly controlled firewalls preventing anything but internet access.


3

It sounds like they have their netmasks set improperly. If they're both in 24.123.68.0/24 and they both have their netmask set to /24, then each one will think the other one's hosts are on its local network, so it will use ARP to try to connect to them locally, which won't work. It sounds like whoever configured the routers didn't correctly set the netmask. ...


3

The address option will accept fully qualified domain names. address=/mydomain.com/192.168.1.156


3

Based purely on observation I refute that theory. I frequently have machines connecting to the same point at different speeds and none are affected when another connects at a slower speed (other than by virtue of them all sharing the same feed bandwidth.


2

A network route does not take into account the source ip address, only the destination ip address. This is like saying "if someone wants to go to network 1.2.3.4, use the 192.168.1.xx as the gateway". What you want to do is saying: " Traffic coming from this ip address goes to internet via this specific gateway ". This is slightly more complicated. The ...


2

I'd go with the third option, you can place it anywhere you'd like on your network, I usually set networks up in a similar manner, .1 as the router, .2 as the first DNS server, so on. Plus it's easier to type if you're assigning the address to more than a few PCs :) You will have to add the IP to your machines to allow them to resolve domain names locally, ...


2

File sharing will work cross-subnet. I'd suggest something like the following: You have 2 routers. 1 connected to each WAN. Router 1 has the IP range 192.168.1.* and router 2 192.168.2.* One of the extra LAN interfaces on router 1 is assigned an IP address within the 192.168.2.* range. Let's say 192.168.2.100. Router 2 has a static route added to it to ...


2

Hosts cannot be forced to renew their lease, unless you trigger them. This means you would need to do an 'ipconfig /renew' or 'dhclient eth0' or similar from each system to force it to renew the lease. However, with DD-WRT you can have DHCP return the same IP address for each host in your network, and start the DNS service on your router and have it map ...


2

Set your DHCP server (likely your router) to hand out leases with your CentOS box as primary DNS and the router as secondary. Reason being you would prefer your client pc's to use the CentOS box as this has the relevant records for our testing websites and anything else, and when you do have to take this box down, clients will fall back to your router which ...


2

I can think of two solutions to your problem. In both cases, set the DNS for your clients to the dd-wrt router. Option A: setup dd-wrt with your CentOS box as primary DNS, and your ISPs DNS as secondary DNS. In dd-wrt, you can enforce strict ordering of DNS servers, which overcomes the restriction I pointed out in response to Robin's answer. References: ...


2

This is the task of the WPAD protocol. There is Squid-specific documentation.


2

If you just need a simple curses-based interface, iptraf might be what you need. It shows you what connections are currently going on. However, if you need something more sophisticated, you could use the ipt_netflow Netfilter-target, which will send all the accounting-data to a Netflow-target. P.S.: The OpenWRT website gives more pointers about ...


2

Perhaps, as you said, you made no changes on the router, the issue may be due to IP-address exhaustion. Default Lease Time on DD-WRT is 1440 mins, i.e. 24H. Try running "ipconfig /release" & "ipconfig /renew" on a client machine with Wi-Fi enabled. View active IP-address leases on Status tab > LAN tab. If this is the case, change lease time to a ...



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