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11

For an HP ProLiant DL160 G6, there are a few things to consider. First, that's not HP RAM!!! It's Kingston Memory. Furthermore, your 8GB module is a Quad-Rank DIMM and the 4GB module is a Dual-Rank DIMM. (Here's why ranks matter) This complicates things, as HP does not sell a Quad-Rank 8GB module in the product lineup. Second, you must upgrade the ...


4

DDR2 is roughly twice the speed of DDR(1) and as stated they are designed specifically to not be cross compatible - both physically and electrically. Let us know the exact details of the server and we'll try to let you know if you've been ripped off or not - DDR(1) is a very old technology.


3

See question #4 of the page for CPU-Z to see why it might misreport what RAM you have installed. If you eyeball your RAM, most RAM sold in recent years has a sticker on it that says exactly what speed it is. You said that CPU-Z reported your memory as: DRAM frequency of 200MHz CAS Latency 3 clocks RAS to CAS delay 4 clocks RAS precharge 4 clocks cycle ...


3

Market segmentation. There might be technical reasons, but the existence of these technical reasons is again a consequence of this segmentation.


3

You need unregistered, ECC RAM for this server. Often, registered memory will work on systems that officially only support unregistered memory, however combinations of registered memory and unregistered memory almost never work. If your existing memory is unregistered, adding registered memory almost definitely won't work.


3

This is going to sound preachy, but the easiest way to avoid getting incompatible RAM for a server, frankly, is to just purchase the RAM from the manufacturer. It's a little more expensive in many cases, but you get the manufacturer's support and the knowledge that the RAM will work. Odds are good that the time / money you've wasted in purchasing ...


3

It depends on exactly which model of the 380 you have, you didn't include that information. The small form-fcator version only supports 4GB while the larger models support 8GB. Have a look HERE. Oh and this question was really more appropriate for superuser.com but it was very easy to get this answer so that's fine.


1

CAN I USE FASTER RATED STICKS THAN THE BOARD IS RATED FOR? Generally all DDR is backward compatible and can run at any bus speed slower than it is rated to run. For example if your PC has a 266MHz FSB (Front Side Bus), you will need PC2100 266MHz DDR. If your PC has a 266MHz FSB, you can use PC2100 266MHz or PC2700 333MHz DDR. All PCs that accept PC2100 DDR ...


1

It's a function of the chipset. The chipset will dictate the max RAM. From desktops, servers to laptops, it's all about the chipset. Most newer laptops max out around 8GB. I imagine only a handful of top laptops can support 16GB.


1

Is this a linux system? If so: sudo dmidecode --type 17 (from here: http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/check-ram-speed-linux/)


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Install dmidecode and read this information: http://linuxator.wordpress.com/2008/10/28/using-dmidecode-to-find-out-what-memory-chips-you-have/


1

667 and 400 indicate the bus speed of the RAM; higher is better. Then there's also the issue of DDR vs. DDR2; DDR2 is better. When it comes to latency, the first number (CAS latency) is the more important of the four numbers; lower is better.



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