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14

Your system I assume is still up, so the best thing to do is make an immediate backup, dump the disks/array, rebuild, and restore from the backup. Bad blocks don't always mean your backups are also bad. If you haven't experienced any performance problems or damaged files, then your backups should still be complete enough to finish a restore. To test, take ...


7

Right this instant, do the following: Stop rotating backups or deleting old ones for this system. You want to keep all of the backups you currently have. Take a full backup of the server. Hopefully the disks are still good enough that your data is intact, and you won't encounter any problems running the new full backup. Then scrap those disks, and ...


6

The short answer is yes, that's the level of performance you should expect to see from the H200. The long answer: The H200 is the old SAS 6iR with SATA 6Gb/s support. It doesn't have the usual features you'd see on a RAID card (battery backup unit, onboard caching, RAID5/6 support). The cache determines how fast your RAID array is (along w/ the # of ...


6

Since you are using a Dell PERC controller, you should also use the appropriate tool for managing it - Dell provides the OpenManage Server Administrator Storage Management for exactly this purpose. It will help you identify and replace the failed disk of your array.


5

Yes, I believe either your controller or the raid backplane is bad. But I think the controller is the culprit. Can you look up the firmware version of the RAID controller (not to be confused with the system BIOS, which you should also check) and compare to what is available on Dell's site? You may find the version is quite old and that critical issues have ...


5

This: Fault Tolerant Shared PERC 8 Card Configuration — [...] The default cache policy for virtual disks created in this configuration is write-through. In this mode, write completion information is returned to the host after the data is written to the disk. is the ultimate performance killer. Change the cache policy to write-back if it is ...


4

RAID 1 is a mirror. The fact that when you drill down into the virtual disk, you only see Physical Disk 0:0 means that Disk 0:1 has failed and is showing as removed. You could try removing the faulty disk (should be showing with an orange light) and re-inserting it - this sometimes kicks off a rebuild but even if that works you should probably consider ...


3

You've been lucky ;). Drivers make assumptions about functionalities present and bugs absent in firmware newer than version X. Only certain combinations of drivers and firmware are tested, because it would be prohibitively resource-consuming to test all the pairs. Also it doesn't make sense to verify new versions of code against an ancient counterpart with ...


3

The answers provided by Grant and Nathan C are great in regards to how you should proceed in handling backups/restoring, and addressing data integrity. Here's some clearer detail on how to handle the RAID set when it comes time to recreate the virtual disk and restore from backup: Verify that you have a good backup of the data Delete the existing virtual ...


3

It's possible as long as the drives are not mixed together. In addition, I would reccomend using nearline SAS drives instead of SATA for stability reasons.


3

Mixed SAS/SATA drives cannot be combined in a single common virtual disk or RAID set, but you can create separate VDs with various types (RAID1 on SAS, and a separate RAID5 on SATA). Source: Documentation (below), and personal experience in Dell Storage Support. H710 User's Guide Page 9: "Mixing SAS and SATA drives within a virtual disk is not supported. ...


2

It looks like that is a custom build server. I presume the perc 6/i is on the motherboard. Assuming you have an appropriate pci-e slot available, I would just add a SATA controller HBA (one which can operate in IT mode, not a "Raid" one), and connect it to the backplane. I like LSI controllers and have been using the 9207-8i - I'm doing SAS (however they ...


2

I have experienced the exact same performance issue with a VRTX with the Dual SPERC8. What I have done to work around this at the moment is, change the dual config to a single config. This way I am able to use write-back, which performs way way better. The exact steps: Remove the second SPERC 8 controller Remove the second expander Re-cable the internal ...


2

From what we know of your environment you don't have enough disk-drives to worry about load-balancing. As Chris S said, SAS is different than SCSI in which there is one connection (channel in old school SCSI lingo) per drive. You have 6 drives, and a total of 8 connections to connect them to. You're already getting the maximum parallelism you're going to get ...


2

Please take a look at the following info: The default cache policy on a physical disk is Enabled in SATA drives and Disabled on SAS drives. When physical disk caching is Enabled, disk I/O performance is improved, but a power outage or equipment failure might result in data loss or corruption. NOTE: It is recommended that you use a backup power source for ...


2

I'm afraid PERC S300 only supports Windows operating system. You may refer to the supported OS list:- http://support.us.dell.com/support/edocs/storage/Storlink/PERC_S100_S300/en/HTML/a5_sectb.htm#wp1207764 MW@DeLL


2

If it is telling you that your firmware needs to be updated, it's because you are running a version that has known problems. These problems can include disks "failing" when they're actually still OK, and the consequences can include downtime and data loss. It is critically important to update the driver first, and then update the firmware. New drivers can ...


2

I don't believe there's an ESXi 5 release that contains Dell-specific support at the moment. You may get most of the hardware status except for the RAID controller. Here's one workaround from someone with the same issue. It involves obtaining the LSI ESXi drivers and loading them onto the system. Also see Dell's OpenManage notes at: ...


2

I have no idea of the cause, but I suggest you begin your troubleshooting by concentrating on getting the service restarted. You can be sure that whatever prevents it from being restarted will also be causing it to fail in the first place.


2

If you have a hot-plug backplane and controller, yes, that's not a problem.


2

In addition to the great suggestions by whitepaws (get a backup, update FW, etc) you may consider contacting Dell support if you're still under warranty. There's a chance that the controller log would have some more information about what's going on, and could clue you in on a potential cause of your issues. In a more direct answer to your question... yes, ...


2

With dell raid controllers the raid config is saved to the disks. If you put the original disks back in it will report a foreign raid config, you just need to import this in the BIOS and the old array will be available.


2

I found I could check the status with MegaCli as ewwhite mentioned: MegaCli64 -PDRbld -ShowProg -PhysDrv [CONTROLLER:DRIVE] -aAll


1

S.M.A.R.T. is not the final word in disk or storage monitoring!! It's a component, but modern RAID controllers use it along with other methods to determine drive and array health. I'm assuming this is a PERC controller in a Dell PowerEdge server. The normal Linux-friendly approach to health monitoring of Dell hardware is to install the Dell OMSA agents for ...


1

You should be able to hot-swap that disk with no issues - go for it! Problems triggered by a drive swap on that controller are rare, usually caused by a combination of old/buggy hard drive firmware and old controller firmware/driver versions.


1

I agree with Jim, but would caution you before doing a swap, to update your RAID Controller firmware. The Open Manage Console should tell you want controller you have, and if it's no the latest firmware, do a quick update first. I've had a few issues with earlier versions of the PERC 700 firmware doing weird things that updates fixed, and seeing as the Dell ...


1

Welcome to serverfault! Based on the information you supplied in your "answer" post (you should edit your question to supply extra information, not post an answer): Oh dear. Looks like you had a failed disk, and then the array ejected another disk for whatever reason - given that the outcome of whatever happened was fatal, it either ejected one of the ...


1

The Dell PowerEdge T420 Systems Owner's Manual provides no additional information on which disks are attached to each cable. Other documentation describes even less. Simplicity suggests either drives 0-3 and 4-7, or odd and even drives in SAS-A and SAS-B respectively. This looks reasonable from the layout in Figure 29. I would try by removing half the ...


1

Yes. That's why they are called hot-swap drives.


1

Forget using any GREEN drives in RAID. This doesnt work. It will fail badly. Just get other drives.



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