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68

Check local fire-codes. Really. In 2003 I was involved in setting up a new datacenter for work. My job was more moving the gear, not wrangling with the architects and contractors who were building it. Imagine my surprise when I found sprinkler heads in the datacenter during my first walk through. I got about a quarter of the way to indignant outrage before ...


40

It's bringing this thread back from the dead, but I wanted to add my two cents to this question. Novec 1230 from 3M is great stuff also. It's a liquid fire suppressant that's: Non-conductive Evaporates harmlessly (and is broken down by UV light as it evaporates) Doesn't damage paper It truly is amazing stuff. You can drop a textbook in it and it'll be ...


13

Generally they look for subtle forensic clues; such as their homepage being changed to a banner which reads "p0Wned by TeH L33t Krew!! haahah1h1!! u noobs"


10

A successful hack is one that goes undetected ;) A sysadmin can set up honey pots, dummy computers to fool hackers into thinking that they're a real system with real data. In the honey pot all activity is monitored and the behaviour of the hacker is studied to help learn more about what a hacker or virus is trying to do to help security experts figure out ...


6

You will need to use an appliance or some software tool that blocks sites based on an array of metrics, including heuristic analysis of text, image colors, and good ol' fashioned human analysis. DNS black lists are not enough since IPs change, resource records change, and there's very little in the way of intelligent analysis that can be done to determine if ...


6

All server rooms should have a Class C fire extinguisher outside the main door. You can grab it on the way in, or on the way out. Depending on the size of your server room, get another to stick on the far side as well. And keep them charged/inspected once a year. FM200 seems to be a popular choice, halon has been outdated over environmental and health ...


5

If you aren't careful about how you trust and authenticate your RDP connections - your passwords and anything else you type is easily snaggable in near real-time over the network any way... so why worry about local keyloggers? ;) As some have already said, no - there is no reliable way. A rootkit can easily make itself completely undetectable for all ...


5

My position is unless you are providing internet access to children, ie you are a school or library, then keeping users off of porn, gambling, games, social networking sites is a management issue, not a technical issue. If employees are properly supervised, then they will not visit these sites. If they aren't supervised, then if you block them, they will ...


5

Plain and simple - you can't. There are way too many types of VPN, way too many providers, and overall way too many variables here to be able to reliably tell if someone is using a VPN.


4

So I managed to solve this eventually. There is a problem (bug) with detecting logical volumes, which is some sort of race condition (maybe in my case regarding the fact that this happens inside KVM). This is covered in the following discussion. In my particular case (Debian Squeeze ) the solution is as follows: backup the script ...


4

Create a startup script in /etc/init.d/lvm containing the following: #!/bin/sh case "$1" in start) /sbin/vgscan /sbin/vgchange -ay ;; stop) /sbin/vgchange -an ;; restart|force-reload) ;; esac exit 0 Then execute the commands # chmod 0755 /etc/init.d/lvm # update-rc.d lvm start 26 S . stop 82 1 . Should do the trick for ...


3

I believe it uses the Link Layer Topology Discovery service built in to Windows 7. I believe you need another Windows Vista/7 machine with LLTD enabled on your network for it to work completely. It seems like you already do and that is how it finds your switch. This Word Document goes into a lot of technical detail on how the discovery process works.


2

Either institute sufficient administrative controls to prevent loops from being formed or replace your hubs with switches capable of running spanning tree.


2

First, uninstall the currently detected mouse. If this is an on-board serial port, open regedit to the following (replace with the com port #): HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\ACPI\PNP0501\<Port#>\Device Parameters Create a new DWORD called SkipEnumerations with a value of FFFFFFFF. Note: If you don't have that registry key try ...


2

@h0tw1r3 has it right, but there is a typo, the registry key is "SkipEnumerations" (with an 's'). You can add this as a .reg file and import it, but you need to enable a separate entry for each port: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 # Disables automatic mouse detection on boot-up on COM1 ...


2

We recently had a similar requirement, also for a Windows 2008 R2 web server, and looked at the same kind of solutions that you mentioned. We discounted OSSEC for the same reasons as you, plus it just didn't seem very 'polished' (same with AFICK too). We discounted Tripwire on grounds of cost and complexity - when we eventually got to trial it, it seemed ...


2

Ideally, your servers will be pretty tight - are these corporate servers or personal servers which also are used for web surfing? In general, I don't believe there is any "one" way to reliably detect any arbitrary keylogger, but these general things may help. Check the Task Manager. If there is any task running that you do not recognise look it up using ...


2

There can be no reliable way unless you fully control the client system's hardware, because there are also hardware keyloggers. And even if you do, there is still the old camera trick.


2

One thing worth mentioning is that YOU NEED TO TEST THE SUPRESSANT SYSTEM. I know of two cases where a flooding was triggered and caused a lot of havoc. The reason seems to be that the outlet pressure is often much higher than assumed. At one place, it (the flooding from below the DC floor) sent old IBM terminals flying off the top of the racks into other ...


1

This should let you see it: http://www.paragon-software.com/home/ntfs-mac/ (not free) and not as good, but free http://code.google.com/p/macfuse/


1

This may help. rEFIt is a tool for booting linux on Intel Macs. In the DMG is a utility called "Partition Inspector" that'll let you know if there are differences between the (EFI-style) GUID Partition Table and the (BIOS-style) Master Boot Record. If you install it rEFIT, and hold down the option key at startup, a menu comes up to choose which OS you ...


1

The top priority in choosing a system is having your particular location surveyed to find out what is suitable, and also making sure you can afford the ongoing maintenance for such a system. Oh and not neglecting small hand-operated fire extinguishers for smaller incidents too.


1

The Boot Configuration Data (BCD) store contains boot configuration parameters and controls how the operating system is started in Microsoft® Windows Vista® and Microsoft® Windows Server® 2008 operating systems. These parameters were previously in the Boot.ini file (in BIOS-based operating systems) or in the nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM) entries (in Extensible ...


1

You are creating a lot of police work for yourself. I would delegate. Make one person at each organisation responsible for registering their members. Give them easy to use tools to do this. The registration should then record both the member details and the member's organisation. The registration process should make the member accept terms of use that ...


1

So geolocation. The most common is to use MaxMind. You can find static copies of geo data around the internet, however they get out of date very quickly. There are other providers, however MaxMind are the one database that ISP's will usually go to and ensure is correct, also google, however they don't make their data public.


1

If you are using onboard RAID and the correct Windows drivers are installed, this most likely will appear as an Error event in the System log. You could test this by making a full backup, disconnecting one of the drives, starting Windows, and checking Event Viewer for evidence of a RAID fault.


1

Like, find(1) ?(*) (unless you are using a packaged version. In which case u should not have more than ONE up-to-date version of the software). (*) As in find / -path '*/joomla/*' -name 'version.php' | xargs fgrep 'var $RELEASE'


1

By definition, no, a wireless router does not "scan" for devices: it (usually) broadcasts it's SSID for other devices to be able to connect to it's wireless access point/network. There's likely some high-end radio frequency scanning equipment out there that can detect the presence of non-broadcasting wi-fi devices (and maybe get a MAC address), but I can't ...


1

The two servers are the same model. They have the same modules loaded, but they are not using the same modules. lspci shows that the two servers of the same model use very different RAID controllers (I hate it when vendors do that: F*cking change the model number if it is not the same model!). On the server, where the disk works, you do not need to setup ...


1

I suspect that you've accidentally connected the Tx and Rx sides together; that is to say, a fiber connection needs to be crossed over when connected Tx -> Rx Rx -> Tx The easiest way I've found to check this is to put a piece of thin paper over the fibre ports, then make sure the one with the shiny light goes into the one without said light.



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