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5

You're better off doing this at layer 7 versus layer 2 or 3. Devices can have their MAC changed as well as their IP address. (It's harder for a user to change their MAC but it's still possible.) If you've got people changing IP addresses to get around restrictions it's only a matter of time before they'll be changing MAC addresses, too. There are a couple ...


3

The kind of fallback behavior you seem to expect is not part of how DNS is supposed to work. The second nameserver in resolv.conf should only be contacted in the event that the first does not respond or there is some other sort of network error. Microsoft have apparently done their own thing, and it certainly is useful for what you are trying to do, but it ...


2

Windows domain member computers will, by default, automatically add the domain's name as a DNS search suffix. For non-domain member machines (or non-Windows machines), though, providing the domain name via DHCP or specifying it in a configuration file are typically the only means used to configure a DNS suffix. If I were in your position I'd figure out what ...


2

DHCP is a broadcast protocol you cannot forward (there is no destination IP on another network). What you need is an IP Helper showing to the DHCP Server (the router has to work as a DHCP Relay Agent, transforming the broadcast into a unicast).


2

You can't control somebody else's computer. If somebody else has "Administrator" or superuser-level access to the machine then all bets are off. You're better off doing this in the network, where you can control things. I see you say "...without the help of the router", but enforcing network policy with the network equipment gives you the best chance to a ...


1

First of all you have to use a managed switch. If you are not using a managed switch, then nothing is stopping a person with sufficient privileges on individual machines from simply spoofing a MAC address of another machine. Once the MAC address is being spoofed, there is no way to tell the difference between the two. With a managed switch you can either ...


1

If your DHCP server (which in some cases is the router) supports static assignments via DHCP you can assign an IP address to a specific MAC Address. There are many ways you can get the MAC address: Retrieve it from the DHCP server log Ping the IP address it was assigned and check your arp table for the corresponding MAC address (e.g. run arp -a during or ...


1

On *nix-based machines, way to go is dhcping: dhcping -h CLIENT_MAC_ADDRESS -c CLIENT_IP -s SERVER_IP you'd have to setup a fix address on the server, of course. On Windows machines there's also a handy tool: http://blog.thecybershadow.net/2013/01/10/dhcp-test-client/


1

The problem is that you have two separate IP networks in the same broadcast domain, and therefore you don't get the behavior you want. You need to set up separate VLANs for the different devices you have, so that there is only one DHCP server per network/broadcast domain.


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Using an Airport Extreme as dhcp server is not a good idea when anyone haves a complex LAN/Scenario, because in the dhcp server you can only set 2 ipv4 dns server address, so in your case use the primary for the internal resolution (win server) and use the secondary for a public dns server (ISP/other) don't forget to set your internal domain name (if you ...


1

As per the comment discussion, the Pi is acting as a router, so you need to ensure each subnet on the different interfaces (wired and wireless) must be different. For example, 192.168.1.0/24 for the wired network (eth1) and 192.168.2.0/24 for wireless (wlan0). If you want them to appear as one network, you need to bridge the 2 interfaces together (eth1 and ...



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