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10

Ip addresses are meaningless without a subnet mask. When you say the scope encompasses the whole 10.2.0.0 range and then say that range is 10.2.0.0-10.2.63.254 you're implying a subnet mask of /18 (255.255.192.0) because that's the only subnet mask that gives you that ip address range, but we wouldn't know that is the subnet mask you're using because you ...


2

The change won't have any immediate effect on any running DHCP clients. When the DHCP clients reboot they'll send a request asking to continue using their currently leased ip address and will be denied and will then request a new ip address. The same process should occur when running clients attempt to renew their currently leased ip address. Make sure that ...


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You definitely need a static IP address for the DHCP server, period; it just wouldn't work any other way. You also need a static IP adddress for the physical server, because of course it starts before any VM and so it would be unable to contact the DHCP server upon starting. So, you have two servers, and both of them need static IP addressing. End of the ...


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1) There's no commercial-grade APs made by Linksys. Linksys is a home/consumer vendor. Rest of it's small business device lines was sucked up by the Cisco prior to the Cisco/Belkin deal of aquiring Linksys. 2) The common approach is to split wireless network in VLANs, one vlan for each SSID. Since enterprise-grade AP is usually simply a bridge, it cannot ...


1

Frankly, I'm a bit worried that someone managing 100+ computers would ask such a question here. Consider getting professional support. To answer your question: You can configure them anyway you like, it really depends what you are trying to achieve. For example, if you are running an Active Directory on your Windows Server, then the computers within the AD ...


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Assuming you are using Ubuntu and a connection named "Wired connection" edit /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/Wired connection and add the following: [ipv4] method=auto dns-search=a1.domain.com;a2.domain.com;a3.domain.com;


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If I correctly understood, to make a static lease you have something like this in your config: host static-1 { hardware ethernet 00:01:02:03:04:05; fixed-address 192.168.1.40; } This will work as you expect, but will never release this IP-address (it does not matter if client send DHCPRELEASE or not) - because it is STATIC IP from dhcpd's point of ...


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if you don't want the gateway/router:- request subnet-mask, broadcast-address, time-offset, interface-mtu;


1

The reason it is not working as intended is that DHCP will look at interface and try to find one network that matches the most You need 2 interfaces (or 2 IPs on one interface) with different network size. But you should avoid having overlapping networks Proper config would be having 2 non-overlapping networks and each of DHCP configs having its own ...


1

Unfortunately WDS is unavailable as a service to run from Windows Embedded. To get WDS on on your hardware you will have to run any version of Windows server from 2008 and up. Windows server 2003 has RIS which is for older OS (E.G. XP 200, etc...) To answer your question, The only way to make your Windows Embedded system a PXE server is to run 3rd party ...


1

I probably misunderstood something but to set static IP you do not need to disable DHCP from the router. Add to the server as many ipv4 ip as you want by going to its advanced settings. I do not even think you'd need to have groups, I'd only use 1 lan for everything (since a router is not a firewall, so I'd not push it too far). Your server would have all ...



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