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6

if a DHCP server is not available. Reserved addresses from 169.254.0.0-169.254.255.255 is used for automatic addressing. It wont conflict because its non routable Manual config can also be done. There after TCP IP takes care.


6

See RFC 2322, Management of IP by peg-DHCP.


3

Behold the beauty of IPv6 - it has Stateless Address Autoconfiguration, defined in RFC 4862. IPv4 has APIPA (RFC 3927) and obviously the option of manual configuration. Note that for functional networking you likely will need more than just "an IP". Name resolution and service discovery likely need to be addressed as well. See Zeroconf for further ...


2

Technically no, there isn't a way to do it without first setting the superscope you want to use. Again, as noted by other users, PowerShell really is much more useful in this instance, but if you must use Command Prompt try this: set superscope MySuperScope 1> (this sets the superscope to use for the rest of your DHCP creating session) then use your ...


2

Other people have asked Ubiquiti for the same thing to no avail. It looks, after examining the code, that it would take some reasonable engineering to make that happen. (Ubiquiti came to the same conclusion.) The Ubiquiti APs are Linux-based and use hostapd to provide their AP functionality. I dug into the source for hostapd a little bit, and am not finding ...


2

Another way to do this is to use SLP (Service Location Protocol). There is an open implementation here which supports most major platforms. http://www.openslp.org/ SLP or protocols like it or derived from it are how printers and such things get discovered on networks. The DNS method is certainly the simplest. But there is no announcement that the server ...


2

If you have the MAC address of the system which is serving DHCP, you should attempt to find where it's physically plugged into your network by logging into your network switches and checking their MAC address tables (on Cisco devices, show mac address-table). That will show you which interface on that switch the MAC address is apparently connected from - if ...


1

If you just want to expand the MacAddress collection you can do something like the following. Get-DhcpServerv4Policy -Name "Allow Private" -ScopeId 192.168.16.0 | Select-Object -ExpandProperty MacAddress I've also seen shorthand examples for expanding collections. (Get-DhcpServerv4Policy -Name "Allow Private" -ScopeId 192.168.16.0).MacAddress


1

It doesn't. You would need to assign one yourself.


1

The load imposed by a DHCP server with that number of clients is pretty minimal, so any reasonably modern computer would suffice. Bear in mind that you might want to hold on to your DHCP logs for a while, so plan to allocate some disk space to that. However, you should think carefully about redundancy. If your DHCP server fails, it could be pretty ...



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