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To force manual IP assignment use ifconfig-pool-persist ipp.txt 0 instead of ifconfig-pool-persist ipp.txt make sure that you have added IPs to all clients.


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Assuming your question is, "how do i stop the conflict?", simply up the start IP of the range, and put the static IPs below this, i.e. range 192.168.2.20 192.168.2.254; and then 192.168.2.1 -> 192.168.2.19 are free for statics. Obviously, you'll have to adjust your statics to fit this partitioning. EDIT: After RTFM'ing a bit, according to dhcpd manuals ...


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You do not need to have sub-interfaces to serve DHCP requests for those network. http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/hardy/man5/dhcpd.conf.5.html DHCP is a protocol like TCP/IP is, so it works on a level before the machines even have IP addresses, therefore you don't need to listen on the sub-interfaces for DHCP requests, you want to listen to the actual ...


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This will not work, as IP aliasing is just a method to add an address to an existing interface. What you probably should do here is VLANs.


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Your post is a bit difficult to understand. First, you need to specify the services you are attempting to connect! If your COMP2->WAN:A is over a NAT'd network, and that service is something like Windows Remote Desktop, then you have to specify in your firewall settings that you will allow certain interactions such as NAT Traversal in your windows firewall ...


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As stated in the comments: Check with another computer to see if the problem appears in other computers If it is the case check the configuration of the port this computer was plugged, as probably is configured in another VLAN.


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I am going to assume you have a firewall (of some sort) between your machine, and the DHCP server - is this the case? If so, does this firewall also route traffic? You may be required to switch on a DHCP helper (This is due to the fact DHCP uses broadcast traffic which routers will not forward on to other segments) If this is not the case, have you tried ...


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DHCP Server UDP 67 DHCP Client UDP 68. There are other ports requirements for different things depending on the implementation, but above is standard.


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Any broadcast traffic or switch flooding of a sufficiently high volume could bring a network down. A switching loop is a good example of this very thing. A malware infection is another good example. I've seen malware infections that used ARP to effectively bring a network to it's knees due to the volume of ARP broadcasts generated by the malware.


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Using the host-name to match. Users could change it, on Android, Settings > Developer Options > Device host-name. But I am pretty sure that 90% of you users leave that setting alone. iPhone and iPad class "Android" { match if substring(option host-name,0,7) = "Android"; } class "iPhone" { match if substring(option host-name,0,6) = "iPhone"; } class ...


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The significance is that in order for you to be able to connect to the VPN tunnel you should have a rule that handles the traffic needed to create the VPN tunnel through your WAN-connected interface and all of you other traffic towards the VPN interface where it will be encrypted and then sent to the other side of the VPN. Without having an internal IP given ...


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Since the link-local 169.254.0.0/16 block cannot be routed, why is it a concern for your IDS? Simply ignore it. (Just make sure that your routers really do block it.) In my opinion, every IPv4 host ought to get and keep an address in the 169.254.0.0/16 block, just as every IPv6 interface is already required to have a link-local address. They can be very ...


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The easiest way is to configure a new vlan just for the phone. On each interface, you should be able to set the 'switchport voice vlan' command. On this new vlan, you can define a new DHCP pool and assign addresses to the phones. We've used this with Cisco IP Phones with no problem, so you may want to test that your NEC IP phones work with the 'voice vlan' ...


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To revert to regular interface names, it's as simple as sed -i ' /CMDLINE/s/ /net.ifnames=0/ ' /etc/default/grub grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg init 6 Don't look at the /etc/grub tree, though: it's now been made horrendously complicated so it's a risky toxic mess like systemd.



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