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2

You have three separate issues here. First, assigning unique IP addresses to Computer 1 and Computer 2 in the LAN (the right side of your diagram). If the router implements a DHCP server, and the switch is just a transparent switch, then the different computers will be served different IP addresses. This is how routers usually work, so you should be fine. ...


1

If your switch does offer DHCP, then it needs to be configured properly if you want it to give out leases for 192.168.0.0/24. The IP assigned to your switch can be without any relation to the DHCP range, which the switch might offer. However, in your setup it is more likely that the router is acting a as DHCP server and the switch will thus just do typical ...


1

If your router lets you change your DNS settings, you want to let the server handle DHCP. You want to set your server as DNS since this will let your clients resolve to Active Directory, but it doesn't really make a difference if the router or the server does it


2

The DNS is the most important service in every AD setup. It is responsible for locating AD related services as LDAP, KDC etc. So every domain joined computer should have DNS client settings configured to point to a DC. The DNS server on the DC should have Forwarders to point to your ISP. This way is a DNS query gets unresolved, the DC will forward the query ...


2

If the server is connected to a port on the router and you turn off the router, how would you expect the workstations to communicate with the server? You should connect the server to the same switch as the workstations.


14

You should have your Small Business Server (Server Essentials) doing DHCP and DNS. SBS will automatically disable its DHCP service when it detects another DHCP server on the LAN. (You can verify this by checking the event logs, there will be DHCP errors, and the service will likely be stopped) Since your router is likely handing out the ISPs DNS, your ...


1

No. The problem is most probably with DNS. Since it is a AD setup, you also need, and probably have set up DNS on the server. Make sure the stations use this DNS as the primary. Other, more elaborate configurations are also possible.


2

The daemon's dying unexpectedly on launch (status=1). It looks like the arguments to tftpd that you have are inappropriate for your current tftp version. Running the daemon from the shell has brought this into view, you have made the server_args parameter make sense for the current daemon, and all is now well.


0

Use of a /32 netmask (either statically or via DHCP) seems to be an increasingly common default configuration applied by VPS providers* to Linux hosts — presumably to reduce broadcast traffic. I'm not certain whether such a configuration would work as intended on a Windows-based host, but a working manual configuration of a Linux host looks something like ...


0

Of course. There are only 4 billion IP addresses and if address once used, could not be used again, we would have run out those a long time ago. On some networks, you get new address every time you connect. And you can even get address that was vacated just seconds ago. ISPs keep record of who used what address at what time. So when tracing someone back, ...


3

Set up a VLAN Put your phones onto that VLAN Put a DHCP Forwarder on the VLAN (your switch should be able to do this). Point the forwarder to the IP address of your existing DHCP server Put a scope on your DHCP server that covers the subnet that the DHCP Helper is assigned to If you are using the piggy-backing function on your phones to plug your PC into ...


0

The DHCP Specification RFC 2131 - which supercedes RFC 1541 uses a 4-octet/32-bit value to represent lease time, in seconds - therefore 0 is zero seconds (I'd advise against not using this), 1 is one second and 0xffffffff is infinity - though 0xfffffffe isn't and actually works out to be just under 136.2 years.


0

The minimum lease time used to be 1 hour (see RFC1541). In more recent versions of the specification, there is no official minimum lease time and the client is supposed to refuse a lease if it doesn't like the lease time. So this client is arguably broken.


0

Are you out of addresses in the lease pool? Maybe that's why it can no longer hand out additional IP addresses. Can you ping the DHCP server from the affected machines once you are into Windows? Can you hard code the NIC to a unused IP from the DHCP range and does that get you onto the network for testing? If needed too, test one of the working PCs on the ...


0

I wrote a DHCP test client program a while ago, works on Windows and POSIX: https://github.com/CyberShadow/dhcptest


1

Once you make a LAN-to-LAN connection, it's all one LAN. You only want one DHCP server, and for convenience, that should be on the router with the Internet connection. If you want both routers on the same SSID, configure them that way, with the same SSID and security settings. Use different channels, if possible.


0

Found the solution, by the way. Our comcast router was forcing the IPV6 DNS. I disabled it entirely on the router and now everything works as intended.


0

Just had this problem myself and found this, without a useful solution. After a few hours i figured it out! Just use this: mode server tls-server and remove: server-bridge And the DHCP will pass directly to the client!


0

If all addressing is done by creating reservations, then you can set the DNS servers in the reservation. This will be the simplest but most time consuming approach. You could make policies based on MAC address that sets different DNS servers. If there is a difference in the hardware between the Linux and Windows machines, you might be able to use a policy ...


1

I'm assuming that you are only using IPv4--if not, you need to check things in both IPv4 and IPv6. I'd start by checking these in the DHCP server: Make sure that you don't have any policy settings that would prevent such devices from being assigned an IP address. Make sure that you have DHCP options set. Make sure you can ping to the server from the OS X ...


1

From the service description: Registers and updates IP addresses and DNS records for this computer. So no, you shouldn't disable this service if you want the server to register it's DNS records in the relevant AD DNS zone (assuming the server is joined to an AD domain). As you've shown in your screenshot, other services depend on this service so those ...


2

As you have discovered on your own, the service is a core component of the Windows networking stack, and thus several other services depend on it; it's really best to leave it running. If all your NICs are configured with static IP addresses, there really is no problem at all with this setup; the DHCP client service is only actually used when a NIC requires ...


1

Most likely, you have to remove the quotation marks around the statement, as IP addresses may not be quoted: subnet 11.11.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0{ option routers 11.11.0.254; option domain-name "example.com"; option domain-name-servers 11.11.0.9; };


0

OK, found another way to do it which works: Stop all containers Edit /etc/default/lxc-net uncomment "LXC_DHCP_CONFILE=/etc/lxc/dnsmasq.conf" create the file /etc/lxc/dnsmasq.conf edit dnsmasq.conf: dhcp-host=container_name,10.0.2.10 service lxc-net restart Now restart the containers and bask in the glory of your own IPs. -- EDIT -- Spoke too soon - ...



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