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2

This is actually correct behavior. It is supposed to prevent a case where your primary server may crash before performing a lazy update to the secondary. You can read the 5.2.1 section of the dhc failover protocol if you want but the relevant quote is: "This allows that server to give a longer lease time to the client the next time the client ...


1

You could add a cron job which checks the IP Address, and restarts systemd-networkd if it has one in the 192.168.100.0/24 range


1

I don't know if this will fix the problem completely, but for starters your router needs to be located on the same subnet. 192.168.1.100 is not within 192.168.2.0/255.255.255.0. If the lease were to be granted as you've configured it, the client would have no path to reach 192.168.1.100 which is on a different subnet.


0

Were you guys able to dynamic updates working via linux dhclient? I can get forward maps to update # service network restart Apr 7 15:25:24 i-d40976dd dhclient[26054]: Added new forward map from i-d40976dd.example.com. to 10.1.133.33 _ # dig i-d40976dd.example.com. ; <<>> DiG 9.8.2rc1-RedHat-9.8.2-0.23.rc1.el6_5.1 <<>> ...


2

Have you tried upgrading the firmware? We've had DHCP problems with 4.0 MR3 firmware and that was fixed with a firmware upgrade. Also, we have a DHCP server on the fortigate just for IPsec clients and it works normally.


3

I too agree that configuring a DHCP relay agent is probably the right way to go about this. Multi-homing a Windows server is generally not a recommended configuration except in very specific use cases.


3

I would definitely lean towards the relay agent. While it may not be a huge concern, giving the server a NIC into that network will open up more possible security vulnerabilities (or will require more effort to lock that server's firewall down a little more. Another benefit of using the DHCP Relay is that if for some reason you need to switch your DHCP ...


6

You could also just let your switch be the DHCP server as well. Multi-homing Windows is frequently a bad idea. Unless you do it perfectly right you can have weird DNS and routing issues. You are better off using a relay agent.


3

In the GUI at least you don't get any additional options, you basically have to open the properties of the reservation. Since it's 2012, you could use: Get-DhcpServerv4Reservation or Get-DhcpServerv6Reservation in Powershell with whatever parameters are available with the command or just the | fl. ...


1

I believe this is possible according to this article. You can set allow/deny filters for the scopes within DHCP. The article is for 2008R2, but I don't see why it wouldn't also be available in 2012.


2

Enable portfast on all the ports. Without portfast, there is a fairly long delay between when a port comes up versus when it can start passing traffic. This is long enough that most DHCP implementations will time out.


3

1 - Is there a limit to the number of DHCP Scopes I can deploy to a Windows Server 2012 R2 server? If there is, I'll need to consider adding more DHCP servers now. According to this: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-US/759becd0-9fbe-44e6-aac8-6f50036294c2/windows-2008-r2-x64-dhcp-server-maximum-scope-?forum=winserverNIS There is ...



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