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31

Is this just the way it was designed in the beginning? Can there really only ever be 4 primary partitions? Yes, that's exactly it. The partition table at the front of an MBR disk (as opposed to a GPT style disk) has a very strict data-structure that dates from the 1980's when space was a precious, precious thing. The design decision way back then was to ...


21

There are only four because the data structures for the MBR partition table only allow for exactly four records describing partitions: You could create additional partition tables nested in definitions of what is called an "extended partition", but the partitions defined therein are traditionally called "logical" partitions. Keep in mind that this is a ...


8

Ok, first thing first: DO NOT REBOOT. What you need is to reinstall the master boot record (basically, relaunch grub or lilo) rebuild the partition table using tools such as gpart (which will scan your hd and try to determine boundaries of primary partitions, not logical ones) since you erased 1.4MB, what I'd suggest at this point is either try to ...


8

You can use losetup for accessing the filesytems, using --offset and --sizelimit (optional) parameters. Just remember that you have to give it bytes. That means offset = 512 * sector. Another idea is to copy the partition table to sector 0, but you will probably need to adjust the sector numbers.


7

The gParted liveCD is probably the best I've seen. It's free, opensource, and a fairly small download, with a nice simple interface.


5

Definitely XFS. XFS initialisation is much faster, performance is excellent, and XFS has been use for multi-terabytes volumes for ages. I currently support 230 machines with 8 to 76 TB XFS volumes. Tens are built with two or more RAID volumes aggregated through LVM without problem, so this is safe enough. xfs_check speed depends mostly on the number of ...


5

Most likely, you're running into a problem where BTRFS has to allocate a bit of metadata before it can remove the file. One of BTRFS's weak spots is its handling of the out-of-space condition; improving behavior in this area is one of the project's priorities. One suggestion on the btrfs wiki is to clobber the file instead of removing it. #instead of this ...


5

/dev/xvdb is indeed mounted, you need to check to see if anything is stored on there that you want to keep, although keeping important stuff on an ephemeral drive is a REALLY bad idea. You will need to unmount /dev/xvdb before you do anything with it. While you can mkswap /dev/xvdb it will make a swap space of the whole ephemeral drive, which you ...


4

When the installer asks you how to partition the disks, choose a custom layout. The installer will show you your existing drives, partitions, volume groups, and logical volumes. Select /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 and choose edit. Tell it to format it and use it for /. Similarly choose to edit /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol02 and /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol02. Tell the ...


4

Should you... depends. One huge reason to keep extra space around is so you can use LVM snapshots. With no free space you cannot use them. As for the reasoning 'so you can expand into it later'.. meh. I'd rather size accordingly and not run into the need to expand later on. Expanding 0 times is easier/faster than expanding 1 time. As for being easier ...


4

The Samsung SM843T is a very nice looking SSD. The key points you want to look at in an SSD datasheet are the figures talking about drive longevity, which may be expressed as device writes per day or TB written. The SM843T datasheet has both, and more usefully has the figure for both random and sequential workloads. A random workload means 100% random 4K ...


4

The first thing I would recommend after an event like this is to take a disk image with dd. Forgive the irony, this really is the best next step. To help you get this right in the future, make sure you use /dev/sda as the if= (Input File) and a file an some other working partition for the of= (output file). The idea is that once you have this image, you ...


4

If you want the rest of the space as a seperate drive, then: Right-Click 'My Computer' Select 'Manage' Navigate to 'Disk Management' Locate the free space and right-click Select 'New Partition' On the other hand if you want the slack space as part of your C: drive, right-click the existing C: partition and select 'Expand'.


4

Have you tried checking WMI for accurate values? You can query common aliases through the wmic command: C:\>wmic partition get name,bootable,size,type C:\>wmic diskdrive get size,status,TotalCylinders,TotalSectors,SCSIPort,SCSITargetId,model


4

We have backup servers including 8-12TB of space, first one (10TB) running ext3 without any problems, and others running ext4. ext4 seems to be much faster with large partitions and huge number of files. We use only single very large partition for data, as it is so much more flexible. And of course separate partition for root filesystem. We are using ...


4

With 4x1TB S-ATA disks you only have one real option considering the amount of services you're going to run, and that is to use one RAID10 set wich gives you 2TB free (raw) disk space without any hot-spare (wich could be quite dangerous). If you're nervous then you'll need to run RAID5 with 3 disks and 1 hot-spare, wich also gives you 2TB of storage - but at ...


4

Setup the 2nd physical drive as drive letter D: and put your page file there. Also partition it for drive letter E: and your user's files. Drive letter C: will be for your OS and program (installed) files. It will also accumulate years of Windows OS patches.


3

I'm pretty sure you don't need to resize that partion. Whatever you are planning to put on there is almost certainly better off on c:\ or another partition. Don't assign it a drive letter and leave it alone.


3

What DerfK said, but however your system is set up, this very likely will be a complicated procedure with multiple steps that all have the potential for total data loss. In most cases, I would likely choose to just reinstall the system (and get LVM into the mix at some point) or, alternatively, free up some space on /. For this, you could move some ...


3

Looking at the comments in your question, it is showing that / is where /dev/sda5 is mounted. You're not going to be able to unmount the root filesystem, because it will always be busy as long as the system is booted from the /dev/sda5 partition. You can use a LiveCD to edit the partition to your liking, or boot into another Linux partition if you have one ...


3

I figured it out, and here is what I did. I was booting to Win 2008 Server, and using the utilities from there. Since I was getting the write protection errors, I thought I would use diskpart and see what I could find. In diskpart I selected the disk and looked at the settings - it showed the disk as read only. So I ran the command: attributes disk ...


3

GParted (avalible as a Live CD/USB) or part of Ubuntu can be used to "shuffle" partitions about. I have used this in the past when my OCD has got the better of me and I wanted to move the free space to the C drive. The process may take a while depending on space used. As with any major disk paritioning, back up anything essential.


3

I would echo what @Chopper3 says-- what you've got should work. Fire up diskpart. At the DISKPART> prompt enter list disk and look down the list of disks for the one you want to create the partition on. (If you have multiple disks this can be a challenge. The ordinal number on the disk is the same as shown in 'Computer Management' and is probably 0 in ...


3

Try using fuser fuser -vam /dev/hdb1


3

You first want to move /home onto the / partition. Unmount /home, remount it in /mnt, and move the directories in /mnt across to the now empty /home directory. Then edit fstab so that /home isn't mounted at boot any more. Then you want to remove the old /home partition and increase the size of the / partition. Gnuparted or qtparted will both let you do ...


3

You can't without destroying and re-creating the partition. There are much worse things than a non-optimal disk subsystem. So no I would not - in fact the only things i would refuse to admin would be .. well i haven't found something yet but when I do I'll let you know. Things ran just fine for years without aligned partitions. Are you seen performance ...


3

graeme@graeme-laptop:~$ sudo parted -l /dev/sda Model: ATA ST9250827AS (scsi) Disk /dev/sda: 250GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: msdos Number Start End Size Type File system Flags 2 1049kB 250GB 250GB primary ext4 boot 1 250GB 250GB 537MB extended 5 250GB 250GB 537MB ...


3

I believe you've run out of inodes on the partition. If you do df -i you will probably find the inode usage is 100%.


3

to expand /var into unused space later on, than to shrink main partition Expanding logical volumes and filesystems can be done while the system is running and the filesystem is mounted (for the more common filesystems). Shrinking a filesystem means you have to unmount that filesystem (for the FS, that support a shrink). If you are talking about your ...


3

A primary partition is a low level concept - it's to do with the initial booting process of the machine, and is based on a well defined set of specifications. It's thus really quite hard to change the number of primary partitions, because a lot of disk and motherboard manufacturers would have to agree to implement a new standard. Practically speaking ...



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