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1

This is not a very good sign. You should make sure that the contents of the disk are backed up, and not use the disk for anything important. However, I have seen disks with failed sectors that reallocated them and remained operational for years, so you could keep it around for a while, e.g., for unimportant stuff, or additional backups. One thing to do ...


2

Yes, you have 16 sectors unreadable, you have tried to do several tests that all have failed in roughly the same area of the drive, so, backup fast, but keep in mind that you have data already inaccessible by now lingering in the vicinity of sectors 92290592, 92290596. You may have other problematic areas, you still don't know if those 16 sectors are ...


6

To answer your question, a failed SMART test is a surefire indication of imminent drive failure. You should back up your data and replace the drive as soon as possible to prevent potential data loss. @sj0h mentioned the Load Cycle Count, which is very high at 447,630. (Most modern hard drives are designed to withstand 600,000 load/unload cycles.) This is ...


2

Apart from the read failures, consider also the Load Cycle Count. At nearly 500,000 this may indicate a reason for failure, or at least high load cycle wear. There is a load cycle for every minute of power up time. After you replace the drive make sure that the new drive isn't doing this as well.


1

I would personally replace the drive. If you, for some reason do not want do to do that yet, but linger on with the drive a while yet, you need some way to ensure that you do not accidentially use the bad areas for new files. I had such a drive on an old Mac just recording video, and decided that I did not want to change it yet, as the videos were just ...


39

Your drive is very happy to do a self-test; from the summary, it has done more than five of them in the past hour. And all of them have failed, early on in the test, with read errors. Yes, this hard drive is failing. As the famous Google Labs report said (though I can't put my hand on a link to it at the moment), if smartctl says your drive is failing, it ...


2

Based on the documentation you quoted I find it quite clear that one is covering the entire duration from one system call to the next, while the other covers only the time within a system call. The percentage of time spent inside system calls versus the percentage of time spent outside system calls will roughly tell you if a process is CPU bound. A CPU ...


2

The time outside the system call is the time spent running your program's code before it gets to the next system call.


2

They are unsigned long integers with a length depending on the platform (32/64 bit). Yes, they can indeed wrap over if the system is very active for very long. You have to consider that when doing any kind of monitoring. See https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/iostats.txt


0

Your network utilization increased at the same time, which indicates you are receiving more requests on this server, or more demanding ones with larger responses. If you haven't changed your configuration, this doesn't necessarily indicate something is wrong. You are probably just getting more traffic.


0

Go for resiserfs or any other fs with no inode limitation. Specially regarding to log files, probably you could pack some tons of small unused files into one bigger tar file in order to free a pretty amount of inodes =) $ find /path -iname "pattern" | xargs tar rvf output_file.tar


1

The only sensible way to ask for a replacement would be by knowing the slot number of the disk. It should be possible to map from the OS to the slot number but it requires calibration in that you need first to learn what identifies a slot and where it is physically. The disk serial number of part number is not readable from the outside.


9

Supermicro is rough... But so is your hosting company!! There's no excuse for that. Ask for a credit on your monthly bill for the mistake if it caused downtime. So think of this: The disk serial number should be irrelevant. Replacements should be based on model number. (One of the downsides of DIY Supermicro hardware is that you aren't dealing with a ...


13

There exist no way at all to (optically) read a disk serial number once the disk is inserted into the system - the holes in the front of the disk caddy are not meant to facilitate reading a serial number but are there out of thermal and/or design considerations. This is generally true for every server/disk array manufacturer. Usually, you replace disks by ...


0

If you want to use WinSAT in server 2012, you can copy C:\Windows\System32\WinSAT.exe from your win8 to server 2012



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