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14

You need to change the Firewall rules on both machines (NOT only the Hyper-V Server) Run this command on both machines: netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group="Remote Volume Management" new enable=yes


13

There exist no way at all to (optically) read a disk serial number once the disk is inserted into the system - the holes in the front of the disk caddy are not meant to facilitate reading a serial number but are there out of thermal and/or design considerations. This is generally true for every server/disk array manufacturer. Usually, you replace disks by ...


12

Run diskmgmt.msc just like previous versions of Windows.


11

2 Terabyte limit on MBR disks. Convert the disk to GPT for > 2TB. Edit: For completeness - Back up all your data first. Wipe out all the partitions and volumes on the disk. Then right-click on the disk itself on the left hand side and choose "Convert to GPT."


10

Drives can be marked as failed in an array for many reasons. Maybe there's a few defective sectors. Maybe the drive heads are failing. Maybe cosmic rays hit your drive at the right angle and time to fail a scan. Maybe their firmware has a bug that breaks under . Some of these are reparable failures, some aren't. The thing is, it's really hard to predict ...


9

1.) Start>Run.. 2.) “CMD” 3.) “diskpart” to load up the utility 4.) “list disk” to list all the disks 5.) “Select disk X” where X is the desired disk 6.) “list partition” to list partitions on the selected disk 7.) “select partition X” where X is the desired partition that is currently marked active 8.) “inactive”


9

This is one of those areas where my views are contrary to the mainstream. We do not have disk quotas, in fact we encourage users to get data onto the servers and out of file cabinets. We have been doing this for a while, in preparation for implementing document management. Disk is inexpensive, and has been for a while. None of the alternatives is more ...


9

Supermicro is rough... But so is your hosting company!! There's no excuse for that. Ask for a credit on your monthly bill for the mistake if it caused downtime. So think of this: The disk serial number should be irrelevant. Replacements should be based on model number. (One of the downsides of DIY Supermicro hardware is that you aren't dealing with a ...


9

From what you describe, the main problem is that they decided to use a RAID5 for such a large array, which is quite a bad choice for this setup, for exactly the reason you experience: Having a 2nd disk fail during the recovery breaks everything, and this second failure is all too likely to take that risk. If they had used e.g. a RAID6 instead, having a ...


7

Windows Server 2008 and newer versions will automatically align partitions optimally. There's nothing you need to do. This was a problem in older versions of Windows. The first paragraph in the summary section of this Disk Partition Alignment Best Practices for SQL Server whitepaper makes mention of this functionality (the paper is SQL Server-related, ...


6

Declustering uses multiple RAID controllers in a way that a failed disk can be recovered by work done by more than one controller at a time. Otherwise, if you lost a single disk in a RAID 5 or RAID 6 array, the rebuild would take about as long as it takes to read all the data from an array drive, which can be very long with modern multi-TB drives. Scrubbing ...


6

Okay, I think the answer is that the COW space for the logical volume is full. Using the command 'lvs' (which I just discovered), I see... # lvs /dev/dm-20: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 0: Input/output error LV VG Attr LSize Origin Snap% Move Log Copy% Convert [...other LVs...] newvm-cdrive mrburns Swi-I- 2.00G ...


5

So it's just a plain old spanned, non-RAID-protected, volume right? If, well you'll have to backup the entire volume, replace the disk, rebuild a blank new spanned volume and restore your data. Essentially you have no easy way to do this, consider using some from RAID other than spanning's effectively R0 setup.


5

You can set up smartd to run as a daemon and email you when a disk error occurs. Add -m your@email.com to the relevant line of the smartd configuration file (e.g. /etc/smartd.conf or /etc/default/smartmontools). This is the line that usually begins with DEVICESCAN.


5

Don't use /dev/sd*, as they map to single paths only. Use /dev/mpath* devices (or as shown by the output of multipath -l). The output multipath -ll shows that the disk you want to use is /dev/mapper/mpath1 Make your filesystem on it, format it, partition it or what ever you like. Just don't use the /dev/sd* devices. looking at your output, mpath1 ...


5

From the man page:- "vgrename Zvlifi-Ep3t-e0Ng-U42h-o0ye-KHu1-nl7Ns4 VolGroup00_tmp" changes the name of the Volume Group with UUID Zvlifi-Ep3t-e0Ng-U42h-o0ye-KHu1-nl7Ns4 to "VolGroup00_tmp". ...so for your case:- vgrename zOuHvA-QTBR-wNPs-3GIQ-b2zQ-yOeH-2fBS87 newvolgroupname ...will rename the volume group with ID ...


5

I hate to say this, but do you know that you were basically adding unraided disks to your pool? The command you provided basically says, "Add another disk to pool nas and stripe it with the existing disks." Is that what you meant to do? The pool is done at this point, especially if anything was written to the bad disk. If this were a pair of mirrors, the ...


4

just test it on a VM with 2 vhd(x) if You are not sure. I have one very old server with windows 2003 and mirroring enabled on system drive from disk management. It works. We had incidents where the first hard drive died. When You boot the system there is an option: boot from secondary plex. We have been able to boot and make it work (it was 350km from us) ...


4

When choosing a solution first you should know the maximum workload that your DB should be ready for. If you have a product that you are installing, that product will have a recommendation for the setup for different workloads. If the product is designed internally, then benchmark it, create performance limits and cost. Deploy your application gradually. ...


4

With that many servers, you should already have some sort of centralized monitoring solution already in place. You should investigate that solution supporting your server vendor's monitoring interface, i.e. HP Insight, Dell OpenManage, etc., because that will yield the most reliable and most useful information.


4

Ah - just my area of specialisation! SQL 'best practices' assume that you use separate physical disk for the data and log yes, but that's in either a server with physical disks locally attached or via traditional SAN methods where a LUN was just part of a single SAN disk. EVAs are very different to this. Depending on which model you have any given LUN will ...


4

Windows Disk Protection is part of the old "Windows SteadyState" for XP (and the even older "Shared Computer Toolkit") and isn't something you're going to be able to use on modern versions of Windows. There is the Enhanced Write Filter for Windows Embedded operating systems, but that's not going to run on Windows Server 2008 (and if you did get it to run ...


4

I have no Vmware EXSI 4 experience, but from a hardware point of view: 1) Yes, you can add the drive that way. It will not be part of any existing RAID arrays. It will not have redundancy. But the PowerEdge will be able to access it and if the drivers of ESX4 allow it you can also use it as a direct usable disk (passthough) from the VM. I repeat: No ...


4

The first best practice is to never put all of your data on a single hard drive unless that data isn't very important. RAID (software or hardware-based) is very necessary. How to organize data to make permissions management, etc. depends on what data you have to organize for sure, but the approach we take is to have department shares with group permissions ...


3

I would echo what @Chopper3 says-- what you've got should work. Fire up diskpart. At the DISKPART> prompt enter list disk and look down the list of disks for the one you want to create the partition on. (If you have multiple disks this can be a challenge. The ordinal number on the disk is the same as shown in 'Computer Management' and is probably 0 in ...


3

Without more details we will have to assume that you are using Hardware Raid. When you enable Hardware Raid the controller abstracts the device and presents a virtual device to the OS. To elaborate: Dell Server, two disks without Hardware Raid enabled Linux would see them as /dev/sda and /dev/sdb. You could then use smartmontools to query /dev/sda or ...


3

GParted (avalible as a Live CD/USB) or part of Ubuntu can be used to "shuffle" partitions about. I have used this in the past when my OCD has got the better of me and I wanted to move the free space to the C drive. The process may take a while depending on space used. As with any major disk paritioning, back up anything essential.


3

The reason for this is because you are using an MBR disk rather than GPT, the maximum size of an MBR disk being 2TB. This is a bug in the disk management UI as in how it displays it, but functionally you'll only ever be able to use that first segment because of MBR constraints. The only officially supported way to change this is to either re-install or use ...


3

Moving forward, you could take incremental backups of your database, but they take longer to restore from, and it's much more complex to do a point-in-time restoration from if you need to audit. As you say you're able to take a full every 30 minutes right now, you could take both an incremental & full every 30 minutes, and only keep maybe a 6 or 24 ...


3

Answering this requires diving into Storage Geek. I apologize in advance. The reason Microsoft seems to suggest 48 separate partitions is for one reason: to maximize in-OS parallelization for I/O's. By having 48 LUNs, the OS has to keep 48 separate I/O queues, and those queues can in theory be served in parallel. If one LUN is particularly slow (it's doing ...



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