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14

You need to change the Firewall rules on both machines (NOT only the Hyper-V Server) Run this command on both machines: netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group="Remote Volume Management" new enable=yes


13

There exist no way at all to (optically) read a disk serial number once the disk is inserted into the system - the holes in the front of the disk caddy are not meant to facilitate reading a serial number but are there out of thermal and/or design considerations. This is generally true for every server/disk array manufacturer. Usually, you replace disks by ...


11

2 Terabyte limit on MBR disks. Convert the disk to GPT for > 2TB. Edit: For completeness - Back up all your data first. Wipe out all the partitions and volumes on the disk. Then right-click on the disk itself on the left hand side and choose "Convert to GPT."


11

Run diskmgmt.msc just like previous versions of Windows.


10

Drives can be marked as failed in an array for many reasons. Maybe there's a few defective sectors. Maybe the drive heads are failing. Maybe cosmic rays hit your drive at the right angle and time to fail a scan. Maybe their firmware has a bug that breaks under . Some of these are reparable failures, some aren't. The thing is, it's really hard to predict ...


9

Supermicro is rough... But so is your hosting company!! There's no excuse for that. Ask for a credit on your monthly bill for the mistake if it caused downtime. So think of this: The disk serial number should be irrelevant. Replacements should be based on model number. (One of the downsides of DIY Supermicro hardware is that you aren't dealing with a ...


8

This is one of those areas where my views are contrary to the mainstream. We do not have disk quotas, in fact we encourage users to get data onto the servers and out of file cabinets. We have been doing this for a while, in preparation for implementing document management. Disk is inexpensive, and has been for a while. None of the alternatives is more ...


8

1.) Start>Run.. 2.) “CMD” 3.) “diskpart” to load up the utility 4.) “list disk” to list all the disks 5.) “Select disk X” where X is the desired disk 6.) “list partition” to list partitions on the selected disk 7.) “select partition X” where X is the desired partition that is currently marked active 8.) “inactive”


7

Windows Server 2008 and newer versions will automatically align partitions optimally. There's nothing you need to do. This was a problem in older versions of Windows. The first paragraph in the summary section of this Disk Partition Alignment Best Practices for SQL Server whitepaper makes mention of this functionality (the paper is SQL Server-related, ...


6

Declustering uses multiple RAID controllers in a way that a failed disk can be recovered by work done by more than one controller at a time. Otherwise, if you lost a single disk in a RAID 5 or RAID 6 array, the rebuild would take about as long as it takes to read all the data from an array drive, which can be very long with modern multi-TB drives. Scrubbing ...


5

Okay, I think the answer is that the COW space for the logical volume is full. Using the command 'lvs' (which I just discovered), I see... # lvs /dev/dm-20: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 0: Input/output error LV VG Attr LSize Origin Snap% Move Log Copy% Convert [...other LVs...] newvm-cdrive mrburns Swi-I- 2.00G ...


5

So it's just a plain old spanned, non-RAID-protected, volume right? If, well you'll have to backup the entire volume, replace the disk, rebuild a blank new spanned volume and restore your data. Essentially you have no easy way to do this, consider using some from RAID other than spanning's effectively R0 setup.


5

You can set up smartd to run as a daemon and email you when a disk error occurs. Add -m your@email.com to the relevant line of the smartd configuration file (e.g. /etc/smartd.conf or /etc/default/smartmontools). This is the line that usually begins with DEVICESCAN.


5

I hate to say this, but do you know that you were basically adding unraided disks to your pool? The command you provided basically says, "Add another disk to pool nas and stripe it with the existing disks." Is that what you meant to do? The pool is done at this point, especially if anything was written to the bad disk. If this were a pair of mirrors, the ...


4

The first best practice is to never put all of your data on a single hard drive unless that data isn't very important. RAID (software or hardware-based) is very necessary. How to organize data to make permissions management, etc. depends on what data you have to organize for sure, but the approach we take is to have department shares with group permissions ...


4

Windows Disk Protection is part of the old "Windows SteadyState" for XP (and the even older "Shared Computer Toolkit") and isn't something you're going to be able to use on modern versions of Windows. There is the Enhanced Write Filter for Windows Embedded operating systems, but that's not going to run on Windows Server 2008 (and if you did get it to run ...


4

I have no Vmware EXSI 4 experience, but from a hardware point of view: 1) Yes, you can add the drive that way. It will not be part of any existing RAID arrays. It will not have redundancy. But the PowerEdge will be able to access it and if the drivers of ESX4 allow it you can also use it as a direct usable disk (passthough) from the VM. I repeat: No ...


4

When choosing a solution first you should know the maximum workload that your DB should be ready for. If you have a product that you are installing, that product will have a recommendation for the setup for different workloads. If the product is designed internally, then benchmark it, create performance limits and cost. Deploy your application gradually. ...


4

With that many servers, you should already have some sort of centralized monitoring solution already in place. You should investigate that solution supporting your server vendor's monitoring interface, i.e. HP Insight, Dell OpenManage, etc., because that will yield the most reliable and most useful information.


4

Ah - just my area of specialisation! SQL 'best practices' assume that you use separate physical disk for the data and log yes, but that's in either a server with physical disks locally attached or via traditional SAN methods where a LUN was just part of a single SAN disk. EVAs are very different to this. Depending on which model you have any given LUN will ...


4

Don't use /dev/sd*, as they map to single paths only. Use /dev/mpath* devices (or as shown by the output of multipath -l). The output multipath -ll shows that the disk you want to use is /dev/mapper/mpath1 Make your filesystem on it, format it, partition it or what ever you like. Just don't use the /dev/sd* devices. looking at your output, mpath1 ...


4

From the man page:- "vgrename Zvlifi-Ep3t-e0Ng-U42h-o0ye-KHu1-nl7Ns4 VolGroup00_tmp" changes the name of the Volume Group with UUID Zvlifi-Ep3t-e0Ng-U42h-o0ye-KHu1-nl7Ns4 to "VolGroup00_tmp". ...so for your case:- vgrename zOuHvA-QTBR-wNPs-3GIQ-b2zQ-yOeH-2fBS87 newvolgroupname ...will rename the volume group with ID ...


3

Is there unallocated free space in which to extend it? You won't be able to extend the C: drive into the space occupied by the D: drive unless you delete the D: drive.


3

First pitfall/issue - there's no support for VHD files in most third party products. For example, if you get a virus and you need to boot from an antivirus CD, the antivirus software won't scan inside the VHD. You'll scan, clean up the hard drive, and then when you reboot into Windows you'll still have the virus. Next - backup images are going to be more ...


3

I was a sysadmin at a school and all students had network accounts. I wanted to encourage the use of computers so I removed the quota limits on the home directories. For most students this went well but some filled up their directory quickly with gigs of video and mp3. Contrary to what you expect this wasn't pirated stuff but their own video footage and ...


3

zpool remove myPool c6t37d0 zpool replace myPool c6t9d0 c6t37d0 This will make one of your hot spares usable as a normal disk (c6t37d0) and then replace the bad disk (c6t9d0) with the now free disk (c6t37d0) Once everyhting is happy physically replace c6t9d0 and then : zppol add myPool spare c6t9d0 And you will be back to a happy setup with 3 available ...


3

Sounds like you are just scratching the surface in terms of managing ZFS storage. Suggest using these 2 links and I think you will pick up some additional data points to get you going: For managing zpools: http://docs.huihoo.com/opensolaris/solaris-zfs-administration-guide/html/ch04s04.html General ZFS Admin reference: [Dead link due to oracle request] ...


3

(I only wanted to comment, but don't have the points.) Just in case JT.WK wanted to know where in the docs this is, this is very similar to "Oracle® Solaris ZFS Administration Guide" page 88 "Activating and Deactivating Hot Spares in Your Storage Pool". I'm still new to ZFS, and the Admin Guide helps me a lot.


3

Answering this requires diving into Storage Geek. I apologize in advance. The reason Microsoft seems to suggest 48 separate partitions is for one reason: to maximize in-OS parallelization for I/O's. By having 48 LUNs, the OS has to keep 48 separate I/O queues, and those queues can in theory be served in parallel. If one LUN is particularly slow (it's doing ...


3

I figured it out. Here is what I did: I was booting to Win 2008 Server, and using the utilities from there. Since I was getting the write protection errors, I thought I would use diskpart and see what I could find. In diskpart I selected the disk and looked at the settings - it showed the disk as read only. So I ran the command: attributes disk clear ...



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