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0

If some change has been made very recently (1 hour or less), then maybe it's still propagating? What TTL values do you have there?


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First, you can (most likely) use your registrar's DNS. I haven't yet seen a registar that allowed you to buy a domain, but didn't offer free DNS hosting. If you want the least complicated solution possible, this is most likely it. Secondly, you can use a free (or paid) DNS hosting service. Just a simple search for 'free DNS hosting' yielded plenty of ...


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There are three parts to this. The first is your domain registrar. This organization is who you purchased the domain name from. The domain registrar is going to be the organization that specifies if you are using delegated Name Servers. The delegated Name Servers are where your zone file is going to be located. The second is your Name Server. Whatever your ...


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While this ventures very close to being an opinion based question, I'm going to go ahead and say that this is objectively a bad idea. You're falling into the classic trap of over-engineering something that doesn't need to be over-engineered. Most reputable DNS administrators (i.e. known names) would criticize this as a bad practice. I don't have to ask ...


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This took many, many, many hours of Google-Fu (about 18 hours, give or take). You have to first log in to your Outlook.com account that you're missing your records on. This must be done on a browser that has never logged into Office365 (so either download a new browser and DO NOT import anything, or clear everything out of your main browser). I used MS Edge ...


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Domain Name Servers work by communicating with the actual company ICANN -the international body that controls and regulates the internet's DNS- central servers to map your IP address to your FQDN. The DNS registrars such as GoDaddy and Dreamhost are fully registered with ICANN as approved registrars. That's why when you checkout at the end of your website ...



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