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50

The whole idea behind the MX record is to specify a host or hosts which can accept mail for a domain. As specified in RFC 1035, the MX record contains a domain name. It must therefore point to a host which itself can be resolved in the DNS. An IP address could not be used as it would be interpreted as an unqualified domain name, which cannot be resolved. ...


6

DNS as a protocol has some different types of values, these are not interchangable. It's important to note that DNS is a binary protocol with strict mappings between the type of record and the type of data that such a record holds. For example: An A record holds an IPv4 address (4 bytes of data, fixed length). An AAAArecord holds an IPv6 address (16 bytes ...


4

And so Glue record will be present only for nameservers which are within the domain for which they are authoritative for. i.e they are required if example.com has nameserver as ns1.example.com and it will not be required if it is on another domain. Sadly, this is an incorrect conclusion to draw. There's nothing to stop you from serving glue records that ...


3

I'll throw this out as a guess. Course, I'm home with the flu so maybe I'm loopy. RFC 974 states: The first step for the mailer at LOCAL is to issue a query for MX RRs for REMOTE. It is strongly urged that this step be taken every time a mailer attempts to send the message. The hope is that changes in the domain database will rapidly ...


3

If you ask DNS for the A record of ts3.vanrust.com, you get two replies: 101.0.105.98 and 103.13.101.81. Possibly you wanted only one of those? In that case, about 50% of attempts to access ts3.vanrust.com will end up with the wrong IP-address. You also have a problem with your glue records. If I ask the top level servers for the nameservers of ...


3

The tilde and dash identify they different types of failures. Consider a message that doesn't match the parameters specified in the SPF record. Tilde is for a softfail, the message will be accepted and marked if it doesn't match parameters specified. Dash is for a hardfail, the message will be rejected if it doesn't match. more info ...


3

The reason why different TTLs are shown at different query is that 8.8.8.8 is a (Virual IP) load balancer which has many DNS servers attached to it. And so every new request that arrive lands on different DNS server each time. This is true with all public DNS servers. And if you would like to know the actual TTL of a domain then you have to query the (SOA) ...


3

No, just create a A record (or whatever you need) and point it against the server you want.


2

It would have been good if the output included the connecting address but based on the provided report it would appear that you connected via IPv6. The reason why I say this is that, when processing the a directive in the SPF record, it looked up example.com.au. AAAA instead of example.com.au. A. If the client connected via IPv6 there is no chance that ...


2

This isn't really about BIND. It's about DNS in general. You're breaking a few basic rules of DNS administration. Multiple Nameservers: You should have at least two NS records defined in your zone for redundancy. Right now you don't. Both servers should be located in physically separate locations in order to prevent DNS outages. One or more of your ...


2

In a very simple form: Your DNS client looks in it's DNS client cache for the answer. Upon not finding the answer: The DNS client asks it's DNS server for the answer. The client's DNS server looks in it's DNS server cache for the answer. Upon not finding it: The client's DNS server (if not using forwarders) asks one of the root hint servers (.) for the ...


2

If you are running as a client, i.e. a consumer of DNS, you won't need any zone file. Asking for zone files through IXFR or AXFR is considered bad behaviour unless you are actually serving DNS for the domain in question. Your resolver will use the root hints to find a .com (gTLD) name server. The gTLD name server then queries a database to see which name ...


2

In your dnsmasq.conf add this line expand-hosts This will allow you to create a name that can be used. This was not asked but if you want to all devices to use it set up the dhcp options. Just for a guide here is my config. expand-hosts # allows /etc/hosts to be used dhcp-range=192.168.2.2,192.168.2.50,255.255.255.0,24h #Range and lease time ...


2

This smacks of DNS. There's a DNS record for www.oursite.com in your internal DNS server that's pointing to the internal web server's ip address. You need to change this DNS record to point to the external web server's ip address.


2

If you're buying the domain purely to reserve the name (And that's fine and recommended because you shouldn't be using AD Domain Names that you don't control) then it simply doesn't matter. It doesn't need to resolve to anything externally at all - you're just ensuring that the domain belongs to you and that you can buy certificates for it in future etc. I'd ...


2

The hostname is a convenience for uniquely identifying the host on your network. It's an entirely internal name that can be anything you want. The hostname doesn't have to be related to any of its DNS names. For example, your host named abc can have DNS records that point to it as www.example.com, mail.example.com, and so on. If you run local DNS within ...


2

If you have dnsmasq enabled you need to use DHCP-option 6 So in /etc/dnsmasq.conf you would add: dhcp-option=6,8.8.8.8,8.8.4.4 To add the google DNS servers


2

DNS server adress corresponds to DHCP option 006. According to the OpenWRT Wiki your /etc/config/dhcp should look like config 'dhcp' 'lan' ... list 'dhcp_option' '6,yourDNSIP'


1

YES, Usually corporate networks are behind proxy. Try to find your git repo server public IP (google it), ping it. If it isn't working you are probably behind a proxy server. If you are behind proxy use: git config --global http.proxy http://proxy_address:proxy_port git clone http://.../.. You can find proxy address in internet explorer ...


1

I often use an external, browser based, dns/ip lookup tool, like GetIP, to get the ip address of a server I'm trying to connect to. Then you can use the address for git, svn, etc as long as it's not explicitly blocked by your corporate firewall or proxy.


1

It depends on how you set up the interal zone. If you create an internal DNS zone for the child domain your internal server will only be authorative for the child domain. As explained here. This way your external DNS is still authorative for the parent domain. Another way of working (which is more fiddly but I've actually had better results with it) is to ...


1

I believe notify-delay is the closest thing to what you're looking for. From the reference manual: notify-delay The delay, in seconds, between sending sets of notify messages for a zone. The default is five (5) seconds. The overall rate that NOTIFY messages are sent for all zones is controlled by serial-query-rate. If you really need ...


1

IN RFC 1025 MX records only point to a RR (resource record) of an A Record or a CNAME. So the mail server sending the mail asks for the RR of an MX record, the mx record lists A records of servers, the mail server does a forward lookup to get an A record and then forwards the mail via smtp to the service host listed as a mail server 'willing' to receive ...


1

Some email servers (like exim) specifically do not allow sending to MX records that point to a pure IP address, so you're required to use a FQDN for it instead to be compliant. This is because most servers expect the MX record to contain a hostname, not an IP (that's what A records are for). Edit: To elaborate, in DNS each record has strict requirements for ...


1

If you ask a root nameserver for the NS record of airbnb.in, it won't know. That's not the job of the root nameservers. The root nameservers will just refer you to the nameservers for the .in registry. $ dig +trace +additional -t ns airbnb.in ; <<>> DiG 9.7.3 <<>> +trace +additional -t ns airbnb.in ;; global options: +cmd . ...


1

This only works on the one machine, because it relies on the transparent proxy being able to interface with iptables and get the original destination IP of the outgoing traffic. Also note that this method is slightly hacky, in the sense that in order to overcome an infinite loop issue (redirecting to proxy -> redirecting to proxy -> ...), the firewall rules ...


1

Check what is the DNS server that is configured in /etc/resolv.conf file. This could be your old bind9 server. If your nodes are using DHCP then you might need to configure this in your DHCP server. Regarding the short cut usage of dev for dev.mydomain.local you need to add search directive to resolv.conf search mydomain.local Once the search directive ...


1

You need clients that actually use SRV records as well and SSH for one does not... Very few common applications/protocols actually do. To have SSH connect to a non-standard port you have to explicitly specify that port on the command line or in a configuration file. For instance ssh -p 2202 subdomain.example.com


1

The WDS clients should be getting their DNS server assignments from DHCP. Check that the DNS servers that are being assigned by DHCP from the router are correct.


1

You've just ran out of TCB (i.e. TCP handles) The cause could be anything, e.g.: Port leaks on any commercial software you're running --> Solution: Review which software are you running and apply any available hotfixes. Port exhaustion attack --> Solution: Ask your hosting provider if your traffic levels are abnormal. Port leaks on any custom software ...



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