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6

If the clients are resolving the hostname properly then you've got another problem. DNS is out of the picture once the hostname is resolved by the client. Some things to think about: Are clients using any kind of HTTP proxy to access the Internet? Does the proxy have the correct DNS information available? What's the DNS cache look like on the client after ...


4

Never shutdown the old server until you know that the TTL of the MX record pointing to the old server has expired. If the TTL is/was 1 week then leave the old server running for 1 week to catch any emails from clients that may have that MX record cached. When implementing an email cutover always check the MX record during your planning phase and adjust it ...


3

Those DNS TXT records are so-called SPF records, SPF being an email sender verification protocol known as Sender Policy Framework. Each validation mechanism in SPF is (optionally) prefixed with one of the following qualifiers, indicating how a match on an inbound message should be treated: +: Pass -: Fail ~: SoftFail ?: Neutral The default qualifier is ...


3

The information they need from you is the name(s) of your DNS server(s). You can chose to set up your own authoritative DNS servers for that purpose, or you can chose to use one of the many providers of authoritative DNS servers. Some of them are free some are not, some supports RDNS for IPv6 some do not. Since the information you need to give the provider ...


2

It looks like you have configured a wildcard DNS record, a so called catch it all configuration: *.example.com is CNAMEs to www.example.com which in turn is a CNAME for primary.example.com which then resoves to 1.2.3.4 That is not a very sane setup, please also see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildcard_DNS_record.


2

In a word, yes. Their message means they are willing to have you set up a BIND server to control rDNS records yourself for the IPv6 block you have been allocated.


2

Strategies for seeing why named fails to start: Check named-checkconf -zj output. (named-checkconf as well as named-checkzone should probably be part of your regular workflow, not only for troubleshooting) Check the logs. (named logs to syslog by default, see your named.conf for any logging configuration you have have that may override this) If none of the ...


2

The actual file not found errors come across as fairly self-explanatory (no such files exist, I suppose?). However, DS records live in the parent zone, alternatively DLV records live at the DLV server. This means that your step 4 does not exist (as per the guide you linked). Can you really not get the DS records into the parent zone instead? DLV was ...


2

Yes! It's not necessary per se, but highly recommendable. It's not so much about overcoming the ability to send email, but about protecting domain reputation. With no SPF record in place, receiving parties have little information to go on when determining validity and authenticity of messages claiming to originate from your domain. By publishing a ...


2

Yes, most likely by executing: dig ns problematic-domain.com @127.0.0.1 dig aaaa problematic-domain.com @127.0.0.1 or host -t ns problematic-domain.com 127.0.0.1 host -t aaaa problematic-domain.com 127.0.0.1 From what I see problem with that domain comes from the fact that two nameservers responsible for that domain have the same ip as the record in ...


2

Your scenario is most plausible. Remember that DNS does not "propagate"; rather, records are cached by other DNS servers for the duration of the TTL. So some sites may be caching that old record for as long as a week. (And broken DNS servers may cache it even longer, but those are fortunately few and far between.)


1

This is a common issue with Outlook 2007 and later (I suppose you use one of these versions, because Outlook 2003 doesn't have these problems). It requires a default gateway to be set. Try the registry fix or use the "Fix it" from MS, I'd say.


1

I would expect this to be a wildcard record in a reverse zone. Either it's a reverse zone that you manage, or your queries are leaking up to your upstream nameservers (probably your ISP) and the response is coming from there. If the wildcard record were on your end, you'd find something along the lines of the following in the most applicable ...


1

No "searching" is necessary. There are two A records for MAC5.ny.ald.com in the ny.ald.com forward lookup zone. The DNS server is returning both of them to nslookup. Jump into DNS Management, navigate to that forward lookup zone, and delete the "A" record that you don't want to be in there. (Likely the device has a wired and wireless NIC and has had both ...


1

If you don't mind losing dynamic DNS updates from client computers you could install Windows DNS or BIND-based secondary DNS servers in the remote sites. Unfortunately, only AD-integrated replica DNS servers (running on Domain Controller computers) will be capable of receiving dynamic updates from clients. I suppose that, as a bit of a middle-ground ...


1

Check your domain controller for a teamed NIC using third party software. Windows servers don't like teamed NICs prior to Server 2012, and after 2012 you'd better be using Windows's own NIC teaming. However, there's ambiguity on the supported nature of NIC teaming on Domain Controllers as Microsoft documentation never actually directly references the ...


1

When you run ipconfig /all what is the node type? It sounds a lot like you have the wrong node type and possibly no WINS server on your network, a similar situation to what happened to this person.


1

this command show the DNS server on your net dig | grep SERVER: | awk -F# '{ print $1 }' | awk -F: '{ print $2 }' 172.17.0.1



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