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0

Eventually they all just figured it out, I guess. I took a look a few days later and the relevant DNS entries existed and I'm no longer getting any errors running repadmin.


1

this command show the DNS server on your net dig | grep SERVER: | awk -F# '{ print $1 }' | awk -F: '{ print $2 }' 172.17.0.1


0

There are multiple providers of public recursive resolvers. At least one of those has some configurable filtering of DNS queries. However the specific provider I know of has taken the questionable move to filter certain domains by default, and for that reasons I wouldn't recommend using that particular provider. But there are technical challenges in what ...


0

Do not set up an MX record if you don't want to receive mails. Also do not open the SMTP port (25). Some spambots surely will try to send an email to your domani but they will be rejected as there won't be any service to accept them. If you have to operate a mail server anyway set up the mail server to REJECT emails coming to that domain.


4

Never shutdown the old server until you know that the TTL of the MX record pointing to the old server has expired. If the TTL is/was 1 week then leave the old server running for 1 week to catch any emails from clients that may have that MX record cached. When implementing an email cutover always check the MX record during your planning phase and adjust it ...


2

Your scenario is most plausible. Remember that DNS does not "propagate"; rather, records are cached by other DNS servers for the duration of the TTL. So some sites may be caching that old record for as long as a week. (And broken DNS servers may cache it even longer, but those are fortunately few and far between.)


-1

Yes there is, and is it called the hosts file.


1

This is a common issue with Outlook 2007 and later (I suppose you use one of these versions, because Outlook 2003 doesn't have these problems). It requires a default gateway to be set. Try the registry fix or use the "Fix it" from MS, I'd say.


3

Those DNS TXT records are so-called SPF records, SPF being an email sender verification protocol known as Sender Policy Framework. Each validation mechanism in SPF is (optionally) prefixed with one of the following qualifiers, indicating how a match on an inbound message should be treated: +: Pass -: Fail ~: SoftFail ?: Neutral The default qualifier is ...


1

I would expect this to be a wildcard record in a reverse zone. Either it's a reverse zone that you manage, or your queries are leaking up to your upstream nameservers (probably your ISP) and the response is coming from there. If the wildcard record were on your end, you'd find something along the lines of the following in the most applicable ...


1

Yes! It's not necessary per se, but highly recommendable. It's not so much about overcoming the ability to send email, but about protecting domain reputation. With no SPF record in place, receiving parties have little information to go on when determining validity and authenticity of messages claiming to originate from your domain. By publishing a ...


0

If there is no network traffic at all, it might be an issue with hosts/lmhosts file. Otherwise, there might be NetBIOS-NS name resolutions going, and looking into packet details might show more clues.


6

If the clients are resolving the hostname properly then you've got another problem. DNS is out of the picture once the hostname is resolved by the client. Some things to think about: Are clients using any kind of HTTP proxy to access the Internet? Does the proxy have the correct DNS information available? What's the DNS cache look like on the client after ...


1

No "searching" is necessary. There are two A records for MAC5.ny.ald.com in the ny.ald.com forward lookup zone. The DNS server is returning both of them to nslookup. Jump into DNS Management, navigate to that forward lookup zone, and delete the "A" record that you don't want to be in there. (Likely the device has a wired and wireless NIC and has had both ...


-1

I found the error... on named.conf I have allow-query { localhost; }; I changed it to allow-query { any; };


0

Make sure your bind server is listening on the tunnel interface (should be tun0 in your case).


2

Yes, most likely by executing: dig ns problematic-domain.com @127.0.0.1 dig aaaa problematic-domain.com @127.0.0.1 or host -t ns problematic-domain.com 127.0.0.1 host -t aaaa problematic-domain.com 127.0.0.1 From what I see problem with that domain comes from the fact that two nameservers responsible for that domain have the same ip as the record in ...


2

Strategies for seeing why named fails to start: Check named-checkconf -zj output. (named-checkconf as well as named-checkzone should probably be part of your regular workflow, not only for troubleshooting) Check the logs. (named logs to syslog by default, see your named.conf for any logging configuration you have have that may override this) If none of the ...


3

The information they need from you is the name(s) of your DNS server(s). You can chose to set up your own authoritative DNS servers for that purpose, or you can chose to use one of the many providers of authoritative DNS servers. Some of them are free some are not, some supports RDNS for IPv6 some do not. Since the information you need to give the provider ...


2

In a word, yes. Their message means they are willing to have you set up a BIND server to control rDNS records yourself for the IPv6 block you have been allocated.


0

I got this working by configuring A record of the NS.


0

whois ifecon.com will tell you the dns servers for your domain name are : Name Server: NS3.GKRISHNAR.COM Name Server: NS4.GKRISHNAR.COM your dns config is bugged because : host ns3.gkrishnar.com Host ns3.gkrishnar.com not found: 3(NXDOMAIN) host ns4.gkrishnar.com Host ns4.gkrishnar.com not found: 3(NXDOMAIN) see also : ...


2

The actual file not found errors come across as fairly self-explanatory (no such files exist, I suppose?). However, DS records live in the parent zone, alternatively DLV records live at the DLV server. This means that your step 4 does not exist (as per the guide you linked). Can you really not get the DS records into the parent zone instead? DLV was ...


0

Within named.conf, one can specify check-names ignore for the zone. Presumably in-addr.arpa zones default to fail whereas forward-lookup zones do not.


0

One way to do it is to set up your dhclient.conf. This is the setting that works for me: request subnet-mask, broadcast-address, time-offset, routers, host-name, netbios-name-servers, netbios-scope, interface-mtu, rfc3442-classless-static-routes, ntp-servers, dhcp6.fqdn, dhcp6.sntp-servers; supersede domain-name-servers ...


0

In order for you to be able to use your own BIND server you would need to setup your bind server and then change the nameserver in the domain to your bind server. This way all lookups for your domain will be obtained (by a client, or dns server) from your BIND server. In this case your best option is to redefine all dns entries in your bind configuration. ...


0

There is a Vagrant plugin for that : vagrant-hostsupdater Extract from the github page : This plugin adds an entry to your /etc/hosts file on the host system. On up, resume and reload commands, it tries to add the information, if its not already existant in your hosts file. If it needs to be added, you will be asked for an administrator password, since it ...


1

When you run ipconfig /all what is the node type? It sounds a lot like you have the wrong node type and possibly no WINS server on your network, a similar situation to what happened to this person.


0

Try this commands: $ mkdir /etc/openvpn/scripts $ mv /etc/openvpn/update-resolv-conf /etc/openvpn/scripts/ $ restorecon -v /etc/openvpn/scripts/ $ restorecon -v /etc/openvpn/scripts/update-resolv-conf $ setsebool openvpn_run_unconfined on $ nano -w /etc/openvpn/config.conf up /etc/openvpn/update-resolv-conf ...


1

If you don't mind losing dynamic DNS updates from client computers you could install Windows DNS or BIND-based secondary DNS servers in the remote sites. Unfortunately, only AD-integrated replica DNS servers (running on Domain Controller computers) will be capable of receiving dynamic updates from clients. I suppose that, as a bit of a middle-ground ...


0

It's unusual for a DNS record to be deleted straight away. It is usually dnsTombstoned first. You can use ADSIEdit.msc to connect to DC=DomainDNSZones,DC=domain,DC=com, and the zone is located under DC=MicrosoftDNS. If the record is dnsTombstoned, it may still be there. You can also use repadmin to confirm if the DNS record still exists: ...


1

Check your domain controller for a teamed NIC using third party software. Windows servers don't like teamed NICs prior to Server 2012, and after 2012 you'd better be using Windows's own NIC teaming. However, there's ambiguity on the supported nature of NIC teaming on Domain Controllers as Microsoft documentation never actually directly references the ...


3

Despite what I configure or do. I get always the same result with dig (like if the data comes from other place bit not my zone file): In your output I notice you have 2 dns servers. ;; AUTHORITY SECTION: mydomain.com. 63046 IN NS dns1.kontent.com. mydomain.com. 63046 IN NS dns2.kontent.com. Your domain server is ...


3

Powershell and WMI. PS C:\>Get-WMIObject -Namespace 'Root\MicrosoftDNS' -List That will list the many different classes in the MicrosoftDNS namespace. Want to get all resource records on the server? PS C:\>Get-WMIObject -Namespace 'Root\MicrosoftDNS' MicrosoftDNS_ResourceRecord Want to get only the A records? PS C:\>Get-WMIObject -Namespace ...


0

Create an AD account, member of "Domain Users", set "Password never expires", in advanced DHCP properties click "Credentials..." and enter that user there. Then make the following setting in DHCP [x] Enable DNS dynamic updates according to the settings below [ ] Dynamically update DNS A and PTR records only if requested by the DHCP clients [x] Always ...


2

1) Conceivably, from a purely technical angle: yes 2) No. The world operates with mx records and there is no incentive to change from a working solution to a different-but-functionally-identical solution. 3) The ability to direct mail for a given domain a non-standard port


2

On a purely theoretical functional/technical level: Yes. In reality: No way. You would have to change an extreme amount of software and every MX related DNS entry. Potential gain: Effectively zero. No, not that I am aware of. It's useless, so why should there be one? SRV allows to specify ports. That could be a minor advantage, but since everyone has ...


0

Most admins use a redirecting load balancer on the apex A record to solve this problem. Redirect the apex to a remote target which can be managed centrally and you should be good to go. This is ideal if the record is remotely controlled or if a CNAME would solve your problem. The other solutions are more complicated, making this the preferred approach where ...


0

I agree with the comments that the tech creating these clones needs some re-education. Maybe some push back on your part, especially if the test servers are on the same network as production servers. In the mean time, this might help you to identify VM guests with duplicate IPs already in your environment. You will need PowerCli, and keep in mind that ...


1

There is no substitute for good IP management policies, ever. The End. Fin. FIN-ACK. Regardless of context, there is no way to prevent people from being stupid with IP addresses unless the software goes out of its way to forbid it -- and it generally can't. How does it know you don't need multiple VMs to hold those addresses, and will only ever online one ...


1

Unless there are other pressing reasons there's no need to create separate zones for MX records in subdomains, you can include the MX records in the main zone. That will also have a small benefit on the DNS lookup times. intranet IN TXT "v=spf1 a mx -all" intranet IN MX 10 intranet-mailer.example.com intranet-mailer ...


4

There most likely were logs in event viewer that indicated IP conflicts. Any monitoring system that gathers and filters event logs should be able to detect that and trigger alerts. On physical managed switches you could probably detect and warn about the duplicate MAC address - I am not familiar enough with vmware virtual switches to know what options you ...


5

When you clone a virtual machine in a vSphere environment, you have an option to "customize guest" when cloning or deploying VMs from a template... This is where you can specify a name, change network settings, specify domain membership and generate a new SID (for Microsoft operating systems). That's all you need to do going forward.


0

I suspect that these machines have been failing to apply Group Policy during startup for awhile-- likely long before you made your Software Restriction Policy-related changes yesterday. I've seen a reasonable number of Windows 7 clients intermittently failing to apply Group Policy during startup in the last 12 - 18 months. The machines have been a mix of ...


0

DNS servers fall into a few different groups: Authoritative server Public recursor Non-public recursor In none of those cases will it make any sense to try to hide their existence. The authoritative DNS servers have to be publicly reachable in order to do the task they were set up for in the first place. A public recursor is pointless if you try to hide ...


0

Windows DNS entries have ACLs. Check and/or set them. Generally speaking, dynamically updated hostnames/A records allow anyone to update them, but static ones do not, but either way, this behavior is configurable. When creating a new A record/hostname entry, you have the option to either allow any authenticated user to modify the record or not: And ...


0

Resolving Name Conflicts If during dynamic update registration a client determines that its name is already registered in DNS with an IP address that belongs to another computer, by default the client attempts to replace the registration of the other computer's IP address with the new IP address. This means that for zones that are not ...


0

Having the canonical hostname (FQDN) as the reverse dns PTR record is what is actually expected. It's also worth noting that while the actual question only mentions 23.239.30.81 the included mail headers clearly show that this particular message was delivered over IPv6, using the address 2600:3c00::f03c:91ff:fe73:2b08. My recommendation would be to ensure ...


0

I think you may need to add a . to the end of mydomain.com on the MX lines as below * IN A WW.XX.YY.ZZ mydomain.com. IN MX 1 ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM. mydomain.com. IN MX 5 ALT1.ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM. mydomain.com. IN MX 5 ALT2.ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM. mydomain.com. IN MX 10 ALT3.ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM. mydomain.com. IN MX 10 ...


1

The important thing is that your PTR record for the IP give out at least one hostname which resolves to the IP from which the mails came. This is the PTR record check. So, in your case, as long as tariffplansindia.com can resolve to 23.239.30.81, and 81.32.239.23.in-addr.arpa resolves to tariffplansindia.com., you're set. If not, change it so it matches.



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