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20

If you'd have posted the domain name (so we can do a WHOIS lookup on it) it would have been more helpful. That being said, there are typically 3-4 contacts for a domain. Registrant, Technical, Billing, and Administrator. As long as you're listed in at least ONE of these three you have a good chance of getting your domain. The process varies from ...


17

Register the domain privately through a TRUSTED 3rd party such as an attorney. Set up a private mail box, PO box, or even virtual mailbox such as http://earthclassmail.com Go take a look at http://whois.domaintools.com and understand that there are many sites out there like this one that track changes to whois information, what IP a domain resolves to, etc. ...


17

Note that which server the clients will hit depends on resolver implementation. Some resolvers will strictly go for NS1, some will randomly chose NS1 or NS2. In either case if the server responds they will not try the other server. The only time they try the other server is when the first server is unable to serve the request. To have a look at a more ...


16

I've used Namecheap for many years and haven't had any trouble. Good prompt service when a registry somehow deleted a name from existence, they helped me get it working again right away (they did all the dealings with the registry).


15

There's no technical reason; as you observe, hp.com is registered, as is x.org. The rule is put in place simply to avoid fights over excessively short domain names, which would be particularly valuable. As an aside, I believe that all .com names of four characters or less are already registered...


14

Assuming the error is complaining about the HELO/EHLO data, you want to use the helo_data option on the smtp transport. The default is $primary_hostname. remote_smtp: driver = smtp helo_data = host.example.com More information is available in the manual. If this isn't the case, you probably want to include some example rejection messages. Just ...


13

No, not a problem. As per RFC 1035 section 2.3.3, all parts of the DNS that are part of the official protocol, all comparisons between character strings (e.g., labels, domain names, etc.) are done in a case-insensitive manner.


12

If you don't know what you're doing, do Google Apps - 5 dollars per user per month.


11

Not sure what you've heard about GoDaddy, but I use them for about 200 of my domains and have been really happy. I've registered, transfered in and out, used their DNS, domain parking, etc., and not had any problems. I've also transfered several domains there for my clients who were having (bad) problems elsewhere, and they've been very happy. I think the ...


11

First, check out the domain on whois, and do a complete DNS lookup. There isn't a web site, but is there an email domain in use? If you browse to the site, do you get an error, or is it "parked"? Does the registrant have lots of domains or just a few? Look on sites like sedo.com to get an idea on pricing. Then, send an email to the admin contact, ...


10

Gandi is an awesome registrar !


10

I think you can do this, but not the way you're trying to do it. An SSL certificate is a statement binding a public encryption key to an X.500 structure which includes a CN, or Common Name, element; a signed certificate is one such where the binding is verifiably certified by a third-party certification authority, using the a public key already known to ...


10

You could do it, but you are going to run into performance problems first, and security problems second. Having a "normal" high performance web server answering on port 80/443 and proxying requests to your app server is the way things are usually done. The "normal" server can handle things like static images, JavaScript and CSS much more easily than ...


9

As I said in http://serverfault.com/questions/82556/domains-and-private-registration-services/82584#82584: "Domain Privacy" is a risky thing to engage in -- you don't actually own the domain and don't really have any rights to it if it's registered through a privacy service. Although it's spruiking their own Privacy service, Dynadot's QA on domain ...


9

You can't. You can define any hostname or subdomain you want in your AD's main DNS zone, but for AD to work properly, the A records for the domain itself must point to your domain controllers. So, having "www.mywebsite.com" pointing to your web site is fine, but having "mywebsite.com" do the same is not. Addendum: hosting your web site on your DC would ...


9

Four things to do: Add the hostname entry to /etc/hosts. Use the format detailed here. If your hostname is "your_hostname", type hostname your_hostname at a command prompt to make the change effective. Define the hostname in /etc/sysconfig/network to make this setting persist across reboots. Reboot the system or restart services that depend on hostname ...


9

Certain applications will use the hostname for certain parameters unless explicitly set. Postfix, for example, will identify itself using the hostname of the machine unless you specify otherwise in the config file. The hosts file is used for name resolution. When resolving domain names, your server will check its hosts file before making a DNS request. ...


9

You will not need to rejoin clients or re-create users if you are doing a domain rename. I don't know what step-by-step guide you're looking at, but the step-by-step guide to domain rename from Microsoft doesn't contain such instructions. I've done several domain renames in Windows 2003 single-forest, single-domain environments with and without Exchange ...


8

Look at dyndns.com, which is all about DNS. These guys know their stuff. They don't just do dynamic DNS, they also do static as well. Their nameservers are geographically dispersed, they're fully redundant, and their web interface is straightforward. They claim only a single outage in years and years of service. They will gladly register your domain for ...


8

You can run VisualSVN Server and IIS side-by-side on the same port using multiple IP address on network interfaces: http://www.itsyourip.com/networking/how-to-add-multiple-ip-address-in-windows-2000xp2003/ To configure VisualSVN Server bind to only specific interfaces use the following steps: Run VisualSVN Server Manager Right click on root element and ...


8

The vast majority of my domains do not have any sort of "private" registration enabled and I have never, in 12 years, been contacted in a negative way by someone who got my information from the WHOIS database. It used to be a spam source, but I haven't seen that in years. I have the benefit of listing a business address and phone number, but still, no ...


8

It would seem that you don't (or your friend) doesn't have a DNS record for 'www' in his domain, this would account for the problem of not being able to resolve the address. To resolve this it should be as easy as creating a new A record (also known as a HOST record) for 'www' and mapping it to the IP address of his web server, with his DNS provider. A ...


8

If NS1 doesn't have the data, NS2 will not be used. Any server that is listed as a valid DNS server for a domain is assumed to have the proper data so if NS2 says there's no such record when queried, the computer making that request will assume that is correct.


8

If you're setting up a subdomain (e.g. www.example.com instead of example.com), I'd recommend using a CNAME to the long form, public hostname associated with the Elastic IP address (e.g. if your IP is 1.2.3.4, the hostname is usually something like ec2-1-2-3-4.compute-1.amazonaws.com.). Amazon has custom-configured servers within their cloud that cause the ...


8

No, not generally. The DNS system was not designed for this kind of one-to-many search, just many-to-one. It may be specifically possible if you know all the domains are hosted by a single DNS provider, and even then it may not be doable.


7

When we register a domain, we put a recurring task in our ticketing system with annual recurrence, assigned to the person who handles the renewals, scheduled so it hits a month before the next cycle. No reliance on external tracking or emails; that doesn't seem to work out well.


7

Yes. Depending on the web server configuration, you either need to not do anything (if using IP-based virtual hosts or not using virtual hosts at all) or configure a name-based virtual host with a ServerName and ServerAlias directive. In Apache, that would look like: NameVirtualHost *:80 <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName foo.com ServerAlias www.foo.com # ...


7

We use the same technique at our site. Our servers run Apache, MySQL and PHP on Linux. Our DNS record contains a subdomain wildcard entry like EK already suggested: www IN A 123.456.789.012 * IN CNAME www This will redirect all the requests to x.y.yourdomain.com to the same ip as www.yourdomain.com - ...


7

By my understanding, you didn't even need to purchase it. If the site is intranet, you could just set up a DNS server to point LAN computers from any domain to any server. On my LAN, I can point http://google.com to my file share.


7

PAPERMASH is the NetBIOS name of the domain. PAPERMASHCORPORATE.com is the DNS name of the domain. You can also log on using your UPN (User Principal Name) in the format: user@PAPERMASHCORPORATE.com http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc739093(v=ws.10).aspx



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