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21

Yes, the hostname really is case-insensitive, as specified in RFC 3986 § 3.2.2, because hostnames in general are case-insensitive in the DNS. This RFC also gives recommendations on how to avoid the problems you mentioned: Although host is case-insensitive, producers and normalizers should use lowercase for registered names and hexadecimal addresses ...


10

The first MX means that the IP addresses in the MX record(s) for the domain you're actually attaching the SPF record to should be accepted as valid. The second one means that IP addresses in the MX record(s) for the domain mail.mydomain.com should be accepted as valid. If this SPF record is for the domain mail.mydomain.com, then the second one is redundant. ...


3

Aside from improving logon times, manageability and removing a potential security issue (depending on where the script is stored etc). I can't imagine why you'd ever want to change to group policy and group policy preferences and WMI. I don't know about you but watching that logon script window makes me feel like Matthew Broderick in War Games In all ...


3

Ok, solution by myself: Add file with pcre: virtual_alias_maps = proxy:mysql:/etc/postfix/mysql_virtual_alias_maps.cf, pcre:/etc/postfix/virtual_alias_maps.cf In file: /^admin@(.*)/ admin@$1,webmaster@$1 Reload, done.


2

The virtual machines aren't bound to your Hyper-V management console, they're bound to the Hyper-V host. Changing the domain membership of the computer that you're running the Hyper-V Manager from won't have any effect on your virtual machines.


2

The message is quite right: Your sender's domain hasn't got either an MX or A record. $ host vps1.preschem.com Host vps1.preschem.com not found: 3(NXDOMAIN) According to RFC 5321 section 2.3.5 the sender domain must be valid and resolvable. If not, any mail server can reject the mail. You fix the issue by giving it an appropriate address record or ...


1

Some mail servers, to mitigate spam, require that the sender's domain resolves to a proper dns 'A' record and in extreme cases to an 'MX' record. Doing dig on vps1.preschem.com for 'A' or 'MX' records does not return anything. Solution - Add A record for vps1.preschem.com root@svm1010:/var/tmp# dig vps1.preschem.com MX +short root@svm1010:/var/tmp# dig ...


1

You should almost always set Host header. Otherwise nginx falls back to default proxy_set_header Host $proxy_host; which in your case would be serverpool which is useless for apache. See http://nginx.org/r/proxy_set_header and http://nginx.org/r/proxy_pass for details. upstream serverpool { server 1.2.3.101:80 weight=1; server 1.2.3.102:80 weight=1; } ...


1

you will need to send HOST: header to your upstream server IP's also this artical is fully ansering to question Make nginx to pass hostname of the upstream when reverseproxying also you nginx config should looks like this upstream serverpool { server 1.2.3.101:80 weight=1; server 1.2.3.102:80 weight=1; } server { listen 80; server_name ...


1

Order is important. Put the allow line before the deny. Also url_regex matches one the whole URL including http:// so you need to change your regexes. Remember to restart or reload squid after changes.


1

Just set up a domain controller and Active Directory site (through the Active Directory Sites and Services utility) at your Brighton office after you've got the forest created at the London office. You already have a server at your Brighton site for DHCP and DNS, so you gain nothing by not utilizing it for domain services as well.


1

Before allowing a certain domain, block all other traffic: iptables -P INPUT DROP (this will drop all connections, even the ssh you might be using, so watch out) Then, allow the domains you want: iptables -I INPUT -p tcp -m string --string "Host: domain.com" --algo bm -j ACCEPT



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