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2

Well, the easy way to do this would probably be to connect to the server by hostname, rather than IP so you don't see that warning. Alternately, ignore it. You can ignore it and connect, which in this case wouldn't pose a security risk, since you know the server you think you're connecting to is the server you're trying to connect to, and not some sort of ...


4

You haven't said which version of Windows the workstations are running, but the easiest thing to do is to launch Group Policy editor to create the policies (like TheCleaner described). Then copy the user and computer folders from the first machine's %systemroot%\system32\grouppolicy\ to the new machine's same location, then either reboot or run gpupdate ...


3

Assuming you have admin rights on that local computer or access to an account you could do the following: launch an mmc (if you have to change accounts, then use runas from a cmd line to launch the mmc) You can add the Group Policy snap-in from File, Add/Remove Snap-in Choose `Group Policy Object Editor" and click Add Change it from Local Computer by ...


5

If you can't use rendom.exe because you have an Exchange organization in your environment, you have to create a new Active Directory domain and use a tool like ADMT to migrate users, groups, and computers into the new domain. Some applications do not support migration in this manner - Exchange is one of them. You will have to configure an Exchange ...


3

As the names of your nameservers are from an entirely different different domain in the case of sunriseholidays.eu no glue is to be expected (the .eu TLD servers are not supposed to have this glue). So that particular part of your question does not appear to be your actual problem. It does however appear that your glue records for ns1.forsunrise.com and ...


8

Do not even bother trying to use an old-style domain. No reason. Samba 4 running as an Active Directory Domain Controller is a perfectly viable setup that works without problems. We have it running in quite a few locations now without problems. There is support for group policies, and the various management tools from Windows work for managing the users, ...


12

What you're doing in heading down a route that will bring you nothing but pain, heartache and absolutely no sympathy from any support personnel. While you can join a Microsoft PC to a non-Windows Domain, there are few scenarios when this is actually a good idea. So, basically, what I'm saying is - don't do this. Build a Windows Server Domain Controller, not ...


4

How does this machine SID play any role in the success of joining a domain or logging in to the computer with AD credentials? What happens when two systems with the same machine SID try to do it? Does the "SID conflict" our admin said has anything to do with this? Why might running newSID help? It wouldn't help. There's some other problem that's being ...


4

I believe your admin has some incorrect assumptions on how SIDs work in a domain environment. The machine SID does not directly correlate to the SID generated for the machine in Active Directory. The whole bit about machines not being able to login or join due to another machine being online really implies that your admin's understanding of AD is less than ...


1

What you could do is set up a reverse proxy to different virtual hosts listening only on loopback. You would get in your www.localhost virtualhost: <VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot /var/www/ ServerName localhost ServerAlias www.localhost ProxyPassReverse /app1/ http://webapp1.local/ ProxyPassReverse /app2/ http://webapp2.local/ ...


3

If the server is not authoritative for a zone for which it is polled, it should either point to authoritative nameservers or return an error. Masquerading as authoritative for Internet zones poses a security risk even if done with the best intentions. Doing so on a private network, as the local subnet IP in your question suggests, might appear to pose a ...


1

This is not possible with bind (you can trick it to always return the same IP for any host that it is not authoritative for by creating a "." zone and put wildcards inside it like *, ., ..* etc but if it is a recursive nameserver, it will not work). You can do it with DNSMasq.


0

A cheap trick I often use is to look at the the "Sessions" listed under "Shared Folders" in the "Computer Management" console targeted at a file server computer where I know the subject user will have a "drive" "mapped".


0

The new SSL certificate if it is signed by a trusted Certificate Authority, it will be valid as soon as it is installed. If users do not see the new certificate in the browsers, this means that the new certificate is not installed on the server or there is a MITM attack, or they are accessing the wrong site. The new certificate could be invalid if: it is ...


2

Based on your reply to metacom ("I should have also pointed out, unfortunately, the computers ideally need to be ordered so I've got to be in the room to find out which ones need changing to which names"), it sounds like you need an information gathering phase first. Create a startup script in the language of your choice that writes the computer name to a ...


2

I have been in a similarl situation before; The way I did is was using netdom, less clicks, and you can use a batch file or psexec to make life a lot easier/quicker. e.g. netdom renamecomputer member /newname:member1.exampledomain.com /userd:administrator netdom add /d:exampledomain member1 /ud:exampledomain\admin /pd:password shutdown /r


3

So you guys were right. Impossible to grant rights to a user outside of your own workgroup/domain. However, I found a workaround. Since I needed to start SQL Server (aka: ssms.exe), I've found that I can start a process as another user like so: runas /user:DOMAIN\user /netonly ssms.exe And it runs without problem SQL Server with Windows Authentication. ...


6

No, that is not possible. If you create a local account with the same username+password, that should work for many activities. It's fairly easy to setup and test, so you may want to try that.


0

To do this first you have to set CNAME DNS records of DOMAIN-2 and point it to DOMAIN-1. After that, adjust you nginx configuration for your virtual host. You will have your server_name directive defined like this: server_name DOMAIN-1; You have to update it to this so nginx also accepts requests for DOMAIN-2: server_name DOMAIN-1 DOMAIN-2; E.g. ...


0

I know this is an old topic, but I wanted to throw in my 2 cents since I had the same question and this topic didn't have exactly what I was looking for (force reboot all AD computers and NOT servers or the DC). There is a way to do this with just a windows command, and here it is: for /f %n in ('DSQUERY COMPUTER -o rdn -limit 9999 ^| findstr /i /v ...


4

Really? Honestly, this question is so lazy, I almost don't want to answer it... but I guess I dedicated 6 seconds on Google to finding the answer, so I may as well share it. To get OS Version: Get-ADComputer -Filter * -Property * | Format-Table Name,OperatingSystem,OperatingSystemServicePack,OperatingSystemVersion -Wrap –Auto Oh, and look, ...


1

You are on the right track. ELBs can be SSL termination proxies. In this scenario you set up HTTPS one time on the ELB and install the certificate there and not on the instances. Traditionally for SSL you needed the web server name to match the CN in the cert. This hasn't been the case for a while now. See ...



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