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45

IMNSHO, you shouldn't be relying on a burn-in process to weed out bad drives and "protect" your data. Developing this procedure and implementing it will take up time that could be better used elsewhere and even if a drive passes burn-in, it may still fail months later. You should be using RAID and backups to protect your data. Once that is in place, let it ...


23

How important is it to burn in a hard drive before you start using it? If you have a good backup, and good high-availability systems, then not very much. Since restoring from a failure should be pretty easy. How do you implement a burn-in process? What software do you use to burn in drives? How much stress is too much for a burn-in process? I ...


13

The system is running very slowly because it has to reconstruct the missing data which involves additional CPU and I/O. If you have a missing disk in a RAID-5 configuration you have no recovery strategy. If another disk goes down you will lose your data. Run, don't walk, to the nearest vendor from which you can get a compatible part covered by ...


13

You mean if the disk is damaged such that corrupted data is read off it that appears legitimate? That's not a "normal failure". RAID 1 protects against normal failures of a single disk. It also won't protect you if one disk catches on fire and blows up the other one. These are "abnormal failures". For example, if one disk's write hardware breaks and it ...


13

We don't proactively replace disks. Wait until they fail or report prefailure status. This is why you have (hardware) RAID, management agents, failure indication LEDs on the server and a monitoring solution. Keeping your gear under warranty and maintain your support contracts (within reason), having cold spares of components that fail often (disks, power ...


9

If one specific physical region of the drive surface goes bad, then until those sectors can be successfully mapped out, you'll get unrecovered read errors when you try to read any data that was written to that area. The drive knows that the sectors are bad (after the failures to access the sectors) but cannot remap the sectors because they already hold ...


8

There is a good summary here. The reasons include: Head crash, where the read-and-write head touches a platter. Faulty air filter, allowing dust to land on the platter Actual failure of the controller electronics. Mechanical failure or worn parts So being knocked during shipping is a possible reason for disk failures, and prolonged use in intense ...


8

Don't panic, this is a common and recoverable error. Your hosting company set up a two-disk redundant array to protect the data in case one of the disks fails. This failure has now occurred. The output indicates that sda1 has failed, and that the RAID1 array is working, but degraded. Right now you're on borrowed time, though. If the second disk fails, that ...


7

Given your clarification, it doesn't sound like any burn-in process would be of any use to you. Drives fail primarily because of mechanical factors, usually heat and vibration; not because of any sort of hidden time-bomb. A "burn-in" process tests the installation environment as much as anything else. Once you move the thing, you're back to where you ...


6

There are errors on your disk. S.M.A.R.T. stands for Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology The specific errors you mention correlate to mechanical degradation of the drive. You can possibly use this report to obtain a warranty replacement fomr IBM. The drive WILL eventually fail.


6

Some causes for harddrive failure include: poor handling, e.g. impact, static electricity vibration high accelration overvoltage/power surge dust or other particular matter, e.g. metal filings rapid changes in temperature - I think EMC says more than 10C per hour temperature change - but check with your vendor plain old high temperature e.g. ambeint temp ...


6

Smartmontools are good tools for this. Install it with yum install smartmontools You can examine your drive with smartctl -t short /dev/sda More options you can find in man page.


6

You detect hard drive failures by monitoring your RAID controller (or software RAID status) for drive failures. When a drive fails, you replace it as quickly as possible. Anything else is a proxy for predicting failure (which is useful, though not as critical with RAID). At the moment there is no better tool than SMART for predicting failure (the very ...


5

1) Backup. Right now no data has been lost. If your backups are not up to date backup now. 2) Read the manual, call the vendor etc. Different RAID systems have different steps for replacing a disk, and done wrong you risk destroying the whole array. Without knowing what sort of RAID hardware/software you have we can only guess at the steps needed. ...


5

Easiest option? Use a cloning utility such as Acronis or ShadowProtect to image directly onto the new drive. For free, ShadowProtect Server will give you 30 days, install, clone, done. *I'm not affiliated with either product, just someone who has used SP with enormous success in the past.


5

Those errors do indeed indicate one of the SATA drives has encountered enough bad blocks to run out of block-reallocation space. That drive is bad, and needs to be replaced. I'm not sure where in the vSphere client that information is displayed, but the log entries are pretty clear. If your hardware allows it, a hot-swap should be doable. Otherwise, you're ...


4

Most modern drives will "vector out" a block that has gone bad. The drive has a pool of spare blocks and the firmware uses these to replace any blocks that are known to the drive to be bad. The drive cannot do this re-mapping when it fails to READ a block because it cannot supply the correct data. It just returns "read error". It does MARK the block as bad, ...


4

Do the replace if you can. On the other hand these are 'only' read errors which is not that bad. If you write to that sector then you can be only sure if it has defects. I would run the vendors utility to check (they also run smart tests) if it has problems. They usually make bootable cds available. You can and should run a self test which you can do from ...


4

First, resize2fs may take several hours or even more than a day to run, depending on the size of your partition. If you interrupted it while it was running, that's a very good recipe for losing all your data. All of the filesystem data structures are probably in an inconsistent state. Now, your drive has errors at the very beginning of the disk, where the ...


4

You've encountered the "Ready for Rebuild" error. This likely indicates that the drive can't finish its rebuild because the disk you replaced is having trouble reading from its partner drive. Essentially this means that you may have a failed disk and a failing disk. I'm curious as to how you discovered the drive failure? Did you receive an alert? A ...


4

The Samsung SM843T is a very nice looking SSD. The key points you want to look at in an SSD datasheet are the figures talking about drive longevity, which may be expressed as device writes per day or TB written. The SM843T datasheet has both, and more usefully has the figure for both random and sequential workloads. A random workload means 100% random 4K ...


4

I have not seen such high numbers or SSD failure rates on MacBooks in my organizations... Things to consider: Typically the SSD failures will be a result of wear out from write activity. Check to see if there are any processes/programs common to the laptops that may cause more wear than normal. Use a tool like SMARTReporter to track S.M.A.R.T. diagnostics ...


3

Run a regular script (cron) that checks zpool status -x output. Longer-term, the ZFS on Linux project is working towards this in the form of an event daemon. The Solaris-derived systems had access to the Fault Management Architecture. As far as automated reports, even commercial solutions like NexentaStor use scheduled checks. There's nothing wrong with ...


3

Try zfswatcher, it works really well for me.


3

Off hand, try doing a disk dump of the dying drive to a healthy drive, and then add the healthy drive to the array.


3

Yes, I have seen this as well, and under very similar circumstances. In my case, it was a "consumer-grade" Western Digital 1TB "Green" drive (WD10EARS) that pulled that stunt on me. The SMART Current_Pending_Sector raw value went from zero to 6, and then to 8, prompting the SMART monitoring daemon to send me some ominous emails. I mdadm --failed and ...


3

198 Offline_Uncorrectable 0x0000 002 107 000 Old_age Offline - 21198 It has failed, RMA it. You may want to run SMART test on it, but with such values it's just a formality, it's highly unlikely it won't fail. To run a test, use smartctl -t long /dev/sda It will tell you when the test will end, then you run smartctl -a ...


3

The drive is physically failing at this point. The most important thing to worry about right now is having a good backup of your data, and a plan to get that drive replaced ASAP.


3

Your process is wrong. You should use raid arrays. Where I work we have made ruggedised raid arrays that are designed to get transported around. It's not rocket science. Shock mounting the drives in oversize enclosures with big rubber vibration isolators will improve reliability hugely. (Seagate constellation-es drives, are as an example rated for 300G shock ...



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