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17

Edit: I assumed that disk A is not mounted as the root (/) filesystem. If it is, just ignore lines with driveA. Edit your /etc/fstab: /dev/diskA /var/www/ auto defaults 1 2 /dev/diskB /ver/www/upload auto defaults 1 2 You can replace "auto" by the filesystem you have on that partition, but the above should work anyway. ...


12

How appropriate, that this should come on the heels of "Backup Appreciation Week" (or whatever it's called). The problem with trying to do anything yourself is that you're just increasing the amount of degradation on the drives whenever you're running them. Decide now if you're going to send it to the pros, and if so, just do it. Presumably if this data ...


11

I'd start here: HP Smart Array P400 controller - Questions & Answers Honestly though almost every decent RAID controller acts the same in the case of a single drive failure in a two disk RAID 1 array. Since the Smart Array is a true hardware RAID controller either drive can fail and the OS will still work just about as fast as it did with two drives. If ...


10

If you gave your current layout (the output of fdisk -l will do if you don't use LVM, the output of "fdisk -l", "pvdisplay -C", "vgdisplay -C" and "lvdisplay -C" if do you use LVM) and the drive/partition you wish to grow, we could give a more accurate answer. Assuming that by "non root volume drive" you mean a drive with a single partition that contains ...


9

It isn't a limit of linux, but of the PC partition table format (invented by IBM I think), and therefore is obviously per drive. Linux actually supports other partition table formats too though I wouldn't really reccommend them if you're running on PC hardware, they're mainly provided so it can co-exist with other operating systems and/or be booted by the ...


8

SAS is largely an "enterprise" tech whereas USB is most definitely not (at least as far as storage goes, anyway). I'm guessing this is why you haven't found any suitable adapters. That said, you're going about this the wrong way. With a good backup regimen, you dont need the original hardware. So, get a good backup system in place and this issue is ...


7

One very important difference is the Time-Limited Error Recovery (aka Command Completion Time Limit) Time-Limited Error Recovery (TLER) is a name used by Western Digital for a hard drive feature that allows improved error handling in a RAID environment. In some cases, there is a conflict as to whether error handling should be undertaken by the hard drive ...


7

Add the -u option to your fdisk -l to you. Fdisk is deceiving you because you are letting it live in a world where cylinders/heads actually mean something useful (this world is long gone). My guess is that your drive is aligning partitions to 1MB boundaries instead of pseudo cylinders that the get seen. The partition isn't ending on the perfect cylinder ...


6

Most commercial backup-software packages have support for a "removable media" option, which is what you're talking about here. It'll do a backup, prompt for operator assistance (swap drives) and continue the backup. These packages maintain a state database to keep track of which data is stored on what media, so you don't have to. If you're in UNIX land, ye ...


5

I would try rsync -a /from/file /dest/file.


5

These directories are created by the windows update service. The service usually extracts the updates in the drive with the most free space. As far as I know you can safely remove the directories if you're able to. In most cases you can't just delete the directories because the permissions are wrong and you first have to set the correct permisisions.


5

Actually I was in the middle of a lengthy answer, when I realized the real answer is: get some shell scripting skills get an overview of directory sizes under the filesystem in question get an overview of file sizes for the filesystems in question for each directory and file find out to which package it belongs to if it doesn't belong to a package you put ...


4

You want to investigate udev. This is responsible for naming the device node under /dev and you can set up rules to give your USB key a unique name.


4

i prefer rsync for this kind of job because if anything interrupts the copy process, you can just run the rsync again and it will pick up where it left off, not at the beginning again. you can also run the rsync while the system is running normally (although it will be slower while rsync is copying files). then, when you're ready to cut over to the new ...


4

Short Answer: Build a non RAID 5 array that can hold the data and then restore from backup. If you don't have a backup “You're Doing it Wrong” Longer Version: Consider RAID 10. If space is a concern buy more disks and go to RAID 6 if your controller supports it or buy even more disks and do RAID 10 anyway. Build your RAID array(s) and then restore your ...


4

Enterprise hard disks also tend to have a longer MTBF (Mean Time Between Failures), i.e. longer life span, than consumer grade ones.


3

You might find useful information using RAID Reconstructor, which is read-only and will scan the drives to determine what's up with them. You'll obviously need to be able to connect the drives to another system, not through a RAID controller. Evaluating your drives won't cost you anything.


3

Cry. We had this happen twice in two weeks. Our AC units were on the fritz and the temperature monitors did not report on it. The heat killed a lot of our drives. Amusingly, our brand new data center, was getting ready for an expansion, and the joyous facilities group said, no worries, you are running at 46% of capacity. Later we found out they wrote ...


3

If you know you simply need to append to the local file and do not want to use rsync (which could potentially take a long time calculating checksums), you can use curl. For example, if you have a large file on a slow removable USB stick mounted at /media/CORSAIR/somefile.dat and only half of it is in the current directory, to resume: curl -C - -O ...


3

It sounds to me as if your device is either amlfunctioning half way through copying, or it doesn't get enough power from the computer. What USB port is it connected to? If you have an externally powered USB hub, use that. Else, go as close as you can to the motherboard - some computers have less power available at the front/top ports, or at the extra usb ...


3

I've seen cheap USB devices do all kinds of stupid things during massive copying. (Where I work we have a USB evaluation version of our software and I dd a 4Gb stick to produce them.) I've probably handled dozens of sticks in the last year. I'm pretty sure I've seen the state machine at the USB stick get jammed under heavy use in cheap models. Again, ...


3

There are many things that seem wrong with your configuration. It doesn't make sense to put USB drives in fstab. Fstab is a mostly static listing of system storage devices and their mount points. You assign a static drive/partition identification (based on controller/device address) to a static mount point. Neither of these are really static for USB ...


3

This is posted on the gmailfs website: "Gmail Filesystem no longer works with the latest Gmail interface, and will not be maintained in the future." Gmail Filesystem


3

It sounds like you have increased the size of the disk; but not the partition. In Windows, Manage the computer, and go to Disk Management (Storage -> Disk Management). Is the disk listed as "Basic" or "Dynamic"? If it is Dynamic, your best bet is to use a P2V tool (VMware Converter, Platespin, etc) to create a new identical machine with bigger disks ...


3

THE most important difference is the level of Vendor Support. If you don't use "hardware compatible" equipment (i.e. OEM) then you may find yourself SOL when the kit dies and you need to get it fixed quick.


3

In general, you probably shouldn't bother with native (primary/extended) partitions, apart from one partition to boot from. Make everything else one partition, and use some volume manager like LVM. That gives you much more flexibility (resizing, spanning multiple physical drives, SW RAID). It also has no limit on the number of partitions :-).


3

You 100% will need an FC HBA, the appropriate drivers for that HBA, some form of MPIO software such as MS's MPIO code (plus the EVA DSM) or Veritas Storage Foundation and you WILL need Command View EVA in order to configure the EVA. Once setup you'll need to us CV to create at least one disk group, set the ports to loop/direct mode (as you'll be using them ...


3

Use cgroups together with CFQ I/O scheduler (the default for many distributions). CFQ is aware of cgroups and can give any user, group or process only x% of disk I/O time. So, if you have one cgroup called sequenceGeek, having 90% of maximum resources, you can then have another cgroup called coworkers, having 10% of resources. Or something similarly fair. ...


3

Your SAS to SATA adapter isn't a protocol translator, just a pin to pin adapter. It won't let the USB to SATA adapter speak to the SAS drive in any language other than SATA... which it won't support. So you won't see anything happen.



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