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10

Use an external dynamic DNS service to associate your IP with a DNS name. Then, you can port-forward different external ports to the same RDP port on different internal systems. This is not routing, this is just one of the many ways you can use the features of NAT. The desktops, of course, will need to be on, and have static internal IP addresses, or else ...


6

Sounds like a good use case for pfSense http://www.pfsense.org/. With pfSense you should be able to accomplish what you want using a MultiWAN setup. Here are a few links from the pfSense wiki to get you started: Extensive Howto: http://doc.pfsense.org/index.php/MultiWanVersion1.2 Loadbalancing different speed WAN links: ...


6

There are "multi-WAN" or "dual WAN" routers that can perform some rudimentary load-balancing and failover using multiple Internet connections. There are a variety of price-points and feature sets, so you'd do well to shop around and compare reviews. You'll never get the full bandwidth of both Internet connections to be "shared" for a single TCP connection ...


6

I have actually had to solve such a problem recently. We have 8Mbit/s for 150 PCs. The problem was not so much regular bandwidth use but people who would download big ISO files and kill the bandwidth for everyone else. We handled this by inserting a caching web proxy (Squid on Pfsense) that allows for 2 bandwith limiting parameters. First one is max global ...


4

I'm kind of being redundant here... as a few people have already mentioned this. However, I definitely recommend Peplink's devices. I mentioned this in another answer but we were recently looking around for a multiple wan solution and we first tried the Barracuda Link Balancer as we are happily using their Email and Web filtering solutions. However, the ...


4

Only you can answer this question by measuring or estimating the bandwidth usage based on the number of queries and/or transactions and the size of the dataset per query and/or transaction, multiplied by the number of queries and/or transactions over a specific period of time.


4

The evolution of DSL lines and technologies such as FTTH has make me wonder if traditional hosting services could be in danger. Absolutely not. There are so many more factors that go into reliable hosting than bandwidth available. Let me know when you get multiple diverse path circuits to several different ISPs, multiple connections to utility power, ...


4

If you get a switch that supports Quality of Service, you can designate a per-port maximum throughput value. Generally speaking, cheapo SOHO routers/switches don't support this, and those that do don't do it very well. Side note: This really isn't something that's normally done in a business. Why do you want to give each user an equal slice? That's not a ...


3

Plug everything into the switch. Give the server an fixed addess which has apporpriate access to the Internet and an address on the 192.168.100.0/24 subnet. Set the default route on server to the Firewall. Block access the 192.168.100.0/24 subnet access to and from the Internet on the firewall.


3

You want to put the router between your gateway and the switch as mentioned. In this typical setup, all traffic between the internet and your local network runs through the router and gateway, which allows you to control the traffic using either device. internets---------[gateway]---------[router]------[switch]---local network 192.168.0.1 ...


3

I have a similar set up, except I use a cable modem and DSL line. From personal experience I would recommend buying a ALIX.2D3 board(quiet/low power) and enclosure. And then install pfSense which among the many features offers load balancing, failover, multiple WAN. pfSense offers one of the most flexible and complete web interfaces, it should have no ...


3

The fundamental problem you have is that QoS in the inbound direction (in to your router) to control traffic headed in your direction is relatively useless. The congestion is occurring at the egress of the ISP device to which your Router attaches. That ISP interface has no relevant QoS applied - it is most certainly a FIFO queue. Thus if the bittorrent ...


3

Are you sure you want it allocated equally all the time? Usually what people want is to ensure that nobody 'kills' the link for others, so something like a Squid caching proxy will do what you need and is free too!


3

You should take this opportunity to reevaluate your whole configuration. Keep the workstation internal. Don't plug it directly into the Internet, and don't rig it so another box via serial. Configure it like any other box on your LAN. Just use a VPN like everyone else in the world that has to grant remote access. You put ACLs on your VPN termination point ...


3

why do some ISPs support the use of PPPoE 100% historical reasons. It's the way DSL was rolled out so that's the way it will stay. Why was it rolled out that way? At the time Telco's had dial-up Internet service using PPP, ATM networks, and Ethernet in their DCs. The cheapest way to integrate this new DSL-thing was to re-use as much of the existing ...


2

Once upon a time, I used an OpenBSD box with pf to load balance accross three lines. If you're the only person working there it's of no real benefit. If there are multiple people there, you'll get some load balancing, although individual downloads won't actually go any faster. (There's quite possibly a better way of doing this, I'm just mentioning what ...


2

There's a nice product that handles your sort of setup. I have a friend who uses one in his small business and he's pretty happy with it, last I heard: Peplink Balance multi-WAN routers. (http://www.peplink.com/)


2

Based on your postcode/company telephone number (from the Multimap link provided and your website) you're serviced by the Locks Heath BT exchange which appears to be ~3km as the crow flies from the location linked to. However due to physical routing you may find the actual line length is closer to 5-6km which is about the limit of an ADSL line. I also did ...


2

There is an important distinction that needs to be made here. Traffic that flows out of a DSL connection changes form a few times along the way. When it leaves your computer, travels through your network and hits the modem, it is Ethernet traffic. Most consumer grade equipment defaults to 1500 and the modem your ISP sends you is also probably defaulted at ...


2

If your modem is set up as a bridge, you just need to forward whatever port you have your SFTP set up to listen on to the IP of the linux server. You can also get around even buying the static IP if you use a service like no-ip.com. Just get a dynamic DNS name, set it up in your router, and then direct all SFTP traffic you yourdnsname:port and it will then ...


2

You can check the MTU yourself using ping. Have a look at this page. For Linux: $ ping -c <packet_count> -M do -s <packet_size> <remote_ip> For Windows: ping -l <packet_size> -f <remote_ip> If you receive an error similar to this: Packet needs to be fragmented but DF set. Then, your MTU has been exceeded. You can try a ...


2

As you are not going to transfer much data, you won't need too much bandwidth. Additionally compression using f.e. SSH Tunnels could help. In my experience, latency is a much greater issue for remote (DB) applications.


2

You're probably seeing a Web Proxy IP when you're accessing whatismyip.com. Unless you know that there's a IP address range routed for you by your ISP (like a /29 range) then you're probably using NAT so port forwarding at your router onto a non-routeable address (192.168.0.0/24 for example) for services like SSH, using the router's IP, is the only access ...


2

The short answer is no. You see the routers IP address because that is the publicly routeable address, your server's address will be in your private address space. The only way you can get to your server is to configure your router to do port-forwarding for particular services (like ssh & www). Do be aware that your routers address will change ...


2

Find in yours DSL modem parameter DMZ Zone end put local ip addres of server to it. Now all connections to yours DSL modem whoud go to server.


2

First, we don't normally do "home network" issues here. You might get the question closed or migrated off ServerFault. Second, FTP is a bad idea. Always. It's cleartext. Easily intercepted. Third, how many concurrent users your site can handle is entirely subjective on your site. Are you just text only? Enough memory to cache everything? Are you streaming ...


2

Can we allocate equal DSL bandwidth to each user & how? Get a proper router, like a decent 70 or so euro Mikrotik 450G. Set up qos policies or at least a queue with equal distribution. Case closed. End user level equipment won't support that, but a lot of lower priced (Mikrotik) ISP level stuff (Mikrotik) considers that a baseline service.


2

I'm a strong advocate of link-balancer devices in these scenario. I prefer the products by Elfiq, but Barracuda, Peplink, Fortigate and other offerings exist. In the Elfiq case, bandwidth from multiple ISP's can be aggregated and distributed using several load balancing algorithms. E.g. round-robin, least traffic, weighted, etc. The inbound traffic can ...


1

We found the solution. It turns out, our Sonicwall firewall set the DSL line as a backup to the main line. It was directing all traffic to the main, slower line and keeping the faster one as just back up. A quick switch in the settings and it was up and running. Goes to show, always check the simple stuff first.



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