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11

The -t argument will tell duplicity from what time to restore. duplicity -t 3D --file-to-restore FILENAME scp://uid@other.host/some_dir /home/me/restored_file Will restore FILENAME from 3 days ago.


8

The s3cmd tool has a great sync option. I use it to sync local backups, using something like: s3cmd sync --skip-existing $BACKUPDIR/weekly/ s3://MYBACKUP/backup/mysql/ The --skip-existing means it doesn't try to checksum compare the existing files. If there is a file with that name already, it will just quickly skip it and move on. There is also ...


7

Why not convert your repo to use the FSFS format instead of BDB? That way each revision will be stored as a separate file, so incremental backups will just send the revisions which have been committed since the last backup.


5

I think it's reasonable to want a full backup every so often: most of my machines are configured to do one every few months. There's nothing magic about that number: the right value is going to depend on how much data you have, how fast it changes, how likely you are to want to restore from anything other than the most recent snapshot, how much traffic and ...


5

Any kind of network security is impossible, short of strictly controlling access to the network. If you are allowing people to plug in a random piece of hardware, that hardware happens to be running a DHCP server, and that server thinks it should be handing out addresses, you will have conflicts. The best solution I can think of with no other changes in ...


5

Duplicity also supports Amazon S3 URLs in this format: s3://host/bucket_name[/prefix] where host is the S3 endpoint for your region, which you can find in Amazon's list of endpoints. In your case, the URL you want is: s3://s3-ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com/MY_BUCKET_NAME/backup Note that: Duplicity can still only create buckets in the US Standard and ...


5

The following command is probably what you're looking for: duplicity collection-status file:///backup-folder example: Found primary backup chain with matching signature chain: ------------------------- Chain start time: Mon Mar 4 10:37:27 2013 Chain end time: Fri Mar 15 15:42:22 2013 Number of contained backup sets: 3 Total number of contained volumes: ...


5

Why not just mount the remote path into your local filesystem tree using sshfs, cifs, nfs or some other facility of your choosing? If you do that, you can specify two local paths to duplicity and it shouldn't notice that one of the paths is actually on a remote node (make sure you choose the remote file system that exports attributes like permissions etc. ...


4

Theoretically this is correct. However, using ifconfig to retrieve the relevant figures is a very roundabout way to achieve this. You'd be much better off using SNMP. All interfaces have entries in the standard SNMP MIBs, which describe them and also their current connection speed, plus all sorts of relevant counters. SNMP is available through standard ...


4

In case anyone else comes across this (as I just have) there are some reasonably detailed (and mostly correct) steps over here. Key details The key point is to unpack all of the duplicity-full.*.difftar.gz files in the same place, so that you're left with just two snapshot/ and multivol_snapshot/ directories. If your file is in snapshot/ then you're done. ...


4

Are you using absolute paths? Cron jobs won't open an interactive shell, so bash init scripts (bashrc, bash_profile, etc.) that usually set the PATH may not be run--and if they are, they'll be using root's, not yours. If you're unsure about where the command is, you can use which <command> to find out the absolute path. When dealing with cron ...


3

The default mode of duplicity is to use a symmetric key which consists of a simple passphrase. There's no way I would use that though: if you have to type the key, you can't run an unattended backup! If you want to run an unattended backup, you have to pass duplicity a public key somehow. The only kind of public key that duplicity supports is GPG, and that ...


3

What you are asking for is called a synthetic full backup, which refers to the process of getting a full backup by merging an incremental backup with a previous full backup on the destination side (ie: the backup server). I'm not familiar with Duplicity, but from their website it appears to not do synthetic full backups. You must keep all of the ...


3

You might try dumping the full list of files, then searching that list for the file in question: duplicity list-current-files url > /path/to/file-list.txt grep filename /path/to/file-list.txt This command is poorly documented, but each line in the file has a date that appears to be last modified time.


3

You say in a comment that you are seeing about 50 MB/s throughput on those backups. 50 MB/s is on the order of what you can expect for semi-random disk throughput with single spinning-rust disks (i.e., not mirrored or striped RAID to allow reads to be spread across disks to increase throughput). Note that some RAID configurations effectively limit even the ...


3

I suggest you restore from duplicity to a different location (probably on a different machine), then use file system tools to copy files into place. That way you can overwrite whichever you choose. Just in case you haven't thought of it: Your strategy assumes that all packages were up-to-date when the backup was created.


2

I believe the default configuration of sudo is to preserve $HOME. So if you were logged in as user1, and used sudo scriptname where scriptname did echo $HOME, you should expect to see "/home/user1" echoed back, not "/root". I'll assume BassKozz hasn't changed this. Perhaps he's not logged in as his desired user1, running the script as sudo. Perhaps he's ...


2

Solution: Added the following to the bash script: HOME=/home/user/ Fin


2

Have you tried the --homedir option?


2

rsync:// should be able to resume transfer in the middle of the file, so if you are backing up large files over semi-reliable network, I would prefer that.


2

You could put up a small Amazon EC2 instance and backup to an Elastic Block Store (EBS) volume via rsync or whatever tool that you prefer. Once the backup is complete, take a snapshot, which will be persisted to S3. It's a somewhat more complex solution in some respects, but makes up for some of the limitations/complexities with S3.


2

from duplicity(1) --ssh-askpass Tells the ssh/scp backend to use FTP_PASSWORD from the environment, or, if that is not present, to prompt the user for the remote system password.


2

old question, but I have an answer. You can set the passphrase in your backupscript, to let it run unattended. #!/bin/bash export PASSPHRASE=<your password> duplicity…


2

I don't know duplicity, but the general restore process is to go back to the first FULL backup PRIOR to the date you want to restore to. Restore that FULL backup, then restore ALL the incremental backups since that FULL backup, in date order, until you get to the date you want.


2

A simple approach is to have a "pull" backup - a separate backup server has credentials to log into the main server to pull the data required for the backup, e.g. using rsnapshot logging in via SSH to the main server. This stops the most obvious attacks where a malicious hacker deletes files on the main and backup server - I've seen people who have ...


2

The easy answer would be offline backups, where the data (or access key) is protected by an air gap (and quite possibly steel and concrete) There are specialized backup systems (usually client + server + custom protocol) that do not support "wipe this file AND every trace in history of it". I belive boxbackup falls into this category (and is open source and ...


2

By enabling "DHCP Snooping" on a managed switch which supports that feature.


2

When mounting cifs, use the mapchars option, which will enable duplicity to write the colon (:) characters that are included in its file naming convention. See http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/man/manpages-3/mount.cifs.8.html for all options.


2

This sounds like a problem with restoring a Windows made backup on a Linux machine. The problem should be fixed in 1.3 beta (r1020), but the details are here: http://code.google.com/p/duplicati/issues/detail?id=482


2

I freely concede that I have no knowledge of the inner workings of keychain, but it's completely reasonable that a local ssh agent should be upset not to have a public key that corresponds to a private key that it does have. Consider what happens when you approach a remote server to authenticate. The remote server knows, from its authorized_keys file, that ...



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