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12

tl;dr - Nope. The difference between static addresses and dynamic ones is merely that dynamic addresses are handed out by a DHCP server. Period. The range of IP addresses that a DHCP server can hand out is completely arbitrary, so without access to the DHCP server's configuration, there's no way to tell definitively which is which. Depending on what lease ...


7

You don't specify the IPs on your client, nobody does that, you point them at the matching DNS record for your services. And for your second question you're update your DNS records to match your new IP addresses. Please don't take this as rude or offensive but this is a very basic question that anyone with even the smallest experience with web/IP systems ...


4

So far it has happened (to you) just once and that was for extraordinary reasons. Considering the drawback of dynamic DNS I really don't think it's worth the bother. If you still want to do it anyway just get one of the DDNS clients and run it on the server itself, as that's the only place it will work correctly. If you are seriously concerned you should ...


4

Unfortunately your PublicDNS/IP will always get changed at start/stop, but there is a workaround which implies using EIP(Elastic IP). You can create yourself an EIP and assign it to this server. In case of a stop/start you'll need to do the assign of the EIP again though since in case of a server stop the EIP gets de-assigned. Also please note there is a fee ...


4

DynDNS will provide a name to IP resolution (something.homeip.net to 123.123.123.123). You don't need Custom DNS to do this unless you require your own domain. Your port forwarding will work regardless of which option you choose. Your router will provide the port forwarding. You can configure your router to forward like this: WAN IP, Port 5900 -> PC ...


4

It is not necessary to have a static IP to run a webserver from home as long as there is a static name in DNS that will update if your IP happens to change. This is possible through a variety of DNS providers. Dyndns and No-IP are probably the most well-known providers. Another DNS provider, EveryDNS (which is now owned by Dyn), also provides this ...


3

I wondering why the clients behind the inside interface have to enter the Public IP, wouldn't it be easier for them to use the private IP of the DMZ host. Then you could make a normal nat eg. static (dmz,inside) tcp (Inside IP Range) www 192.168.1.5 www netmask 255.255.255.255 As far as I get it the problem in your case is, that when a client makes a DNS ...


3

You've already mentioned DynDNS, it sounds like all you're missing is the client. They mention a couple linux-compatible clients on their website. ddclient inadyn Using either of these in combination with a dynamic DNS service should accomplish what you want. I originally assumed that your shared hosting would provide you with shell access. Without ...


3

Well AT&T will have a range of IP addresses that they give out to clients via DHCP. This range however will be very large, it will be used to service all their clients, giving you this IP range would be no use to you anyway, as you can't really go to LexisNexis and ask them to allow you access for this range of IP's, as it would effectively open it up ...


3

What happens if you turn it off and ping the server's IP that it's supposed to have? Anything answering? What if you remove and reinstall the network card driver? Does the server have more than one card, or is it teamed with a second card? Redundancy? What kind of hardware is it? Update the driver on the card? Change the port the network cable is plugged ...


3

Some possibilities: 1) What about using dynamic DNS for each host? The last poll time indicated in the service can be a rough uptime gauge. 2) Something equivalent to Logmein Hamachi can create a virtual private network of all the hosts. The IP addresses of each host in the VPN can be static. Then the normal Nagios monitoring can be done. Or simply regular ...


2

You can use a dynamic DNS provider so you have an easy to remember (and fixed) URL for your machine. You will need to set up an account with a Dynamic DNS provider and install their update client on your VM. Set the client to run when the VM starts, so its new IP will be updated with the DNS server. A few free Dynamic DNS options: http://dyn.com/ ...


2

There isa good chance to do a reverse ptr naming analysis and check for a dynamic / dial in name pattern there. THis should help for internet. http://www.debouncer.com/reverse-dns-check has a short mention of that - most providers use recognizable naming standards for dynamic ip addresses. ...


2

What you're using is IP-based authentication. Nothing wrong with that, I've used it, although always in combination with other authentication methods. But if the IP address is changing, I don't think there's any shortcut to updating the Apache config whenever the address changes, as you described. An alternative is to use user/password authentication, or ...


2

There are several tools (e.g., DynDNS) to update DNS records dynamically. If amen.pt does not allow to change your DNS configuration with an external tool you can create a fix CNAME record for your www address which point to the dynamic address. For example you can have a CNAME entry for www.example.com pointing to dynamic.example.com. You can then use any ...


2

The reason split horizon DNS is set up is almost always because an internal service cannot be reached off of the LAN. For example, Active Directory domain controllers that also hold internal DNS. If your all of your services are intended to be externally reachable then split DNS isn't necessary, strictly speaking. Discard any use of split DNS in your design ...


2

Trust is not something you can force upon others. If it was up to a site operator to declare whether they could be trusted or not, what would malicious parties do? If I was on a dynamic-IP setting up a HTTP web site that I wanted to look "real", I would: focus on the content, complying with standards, passing HTML validations make sure all machines on ...


2

I'm going to go ahead and preach the VPN option. All you have to do is setup a small and simple OpenVPN server and the web server. Generate certificates for each iPad, then allow only the IPs from the VPN to access the website in question. OpenVPN can be hard at first but once you start playing around with it, it should rapidly get simpler. The solution ...


2

My current solution for this is webknocking where I first make a request to a special web page (optionally with my user/pass) that opens up the SSH gates for the IP that I request from. This is how I ssh into some of my servers from my phone. This keeps the extra software involved to a minimum so I could sit down at some cafe computer and authorize it for ...


2

The bellow script would ping your dynamic address and grab the ip only and then compare against the ip stored in last_ip.txt, if they are different the ip in hosts.allow will be removed and replaced with the new ip aswell as the ip in last_ip.txt. You can then set this code on your crontab to run every 5 minutes or 10 or whatever you seem fit. It is not as ...


2

You could use www.dyndns.com to monitor your dynamic ip and change the dns records automatically. I've used it for simple setups and it works well. But, a home internet connection might not be the best solution for a reliable 24/7 software service that always needs to be available.


2

There's a plugin in my evldns framework that can do this. The chaos demo will answer for queries for client.bind with the client's IP address, in either A, AAAA or TXT format as applicable.


1

Ask your ISP for a static IP address if you really need it. You may have to pay, or not, depending on the ISP. That's the simplest way. Other than that, you could restrict access to your ISPs subnet so that any IP address you are assigned will work, but then so will all the rest of the ISPs customers on that subnet. Which maybe you can live with - I ...


1

I think I'm missing a little bit in the description. You mean your internal network is DHCP'd, or your provider is changing your IP address? If you just want to make sure you have SSH access to your machine, you can use an authentication key instead of a password, and only authorize your remote machine to have access. I also install denyhost, which you can ...


1

You could setup an account with a dynamic DNS provider (like http://www.dyndns.com) then allow access by hostname rather than by IP address. Other than that, setup an SSH key for authentication (http://pkeck.myweb.uga.edu/ssh/) as the existing answers have suggested.


1

Going to take a stab at this, even thought it's hard to tell from your description exactly what you're after. Let's assume you're running a webserver on your virtual machine. To be able to access your virtual machine over the internet you need to: configure your vm for bridged networking in your hypervisor -- this will allow you to have a local ip address ...


1

I can understand your concern about 3rd parties playing with an open SSH port. I have solved this in a different manner. On my private server, the SSH port is open to everybody, but it is monitored by fail2ban, a smart little package available for debian (and probably most other distros, too). As soon as somebody fails to log in after 3 attempts from the ...


1

I would approach this from a different way. Rather than having your servers each maintaining a list of whitelisted IPs, I would configure them all to only allow ssh from "internal" IPs. Then setup a separate gateway/landingpad host that you can VPN in to. Now, you can bounce through that box to reach the rest of the servers securely. This limits your ...


1

Note that the DynDNS Custom web page says: Ability to update any hostname with dynamically changed IP address using standard update clients (Dynamic DNS feature for your domain). so that appears to give you what you need. Unfortunately it costs $29.95 a year, which is not free. :(



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