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18

Correct, it is a breach of RFC 1034, section 3.6.2, paragraph 3: ... If a CNAME RR is present at a node, no other data should be present; this ensures that the data for a canonical name and its aliases cannot be different. ... This applies here because the root of your zone must also have SOA and NS records.


7

There is a trick you can use here. That said, Wesley is a smart dude and you should listen to him. I don't get paid to say that but I'm hoping to change that one day. Assuming that you're trying to change a record called www in a zone called example.com.... Create a temporary wildcard A record (*) in the zone. Commit the change. Test it, make sure the ...


6

We're moving across to Amazon EC2 and are using a load balancer, with the recommendation that we use a CNAME instead of an A record I sincerely hope that you're not CNAMEing your apex domain. If your DNS host is self respecting, it won't be allowed. If it's a shameful and slimy host, you'll be able to, but you'll lose a piece of your soul (but you're ...


5

Could you just use the DNS server of your domain name registrar? They usually support subdomains etc. EDIT: In addition your hosting provider often supplies a DNS server as well (even if you rent a VPS or dedicated server).


4

Rent a virtual private server. If that's not enough for your needs, rent a managed host. IF you want to run everything yourself, buy a 1U server, install what you want on it, and buy some colocation space for it.


4

For secondary DNS services, I use afraid.org and buddyns.com; both free.


4

If DynDNS (or whatever you're using for DNS service) fails, then you're toast. The provider can mitigate the risk of failure in a variety of ways, to the point where (in theory) they should be able to provide a strong SLA with reasonable compensation for outages -- the fact that they don't is an interesting data point.


4

Installing anything creates a potential for vulnerabilities - e.g., if there's a vulnerability in the dropbox daemon (or whatever protocol you use for sharing files), or in any other software on your Linux box, it would be possible to exploit it (once it's known). You'll need to evaluate how much of a risk this is for each component that you want to use ...


4

If I understand correctly, what you want is a CNAME DNS record: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CNAME_record


4

DynDNS will provide a name to IP resolution (something.homeip.net to 123.123.123.123). You don't need Custom DNS to do this unless you require your own domain. Your port forwarding will work regardless of which option you choose. Your router will provide the port forwarding. You can configure your router to forward like this: WAN IP, Port 5900 -> PC ...


4

If you wanted to redirect ReallyCoolName.com to Google's main search page, I would suggest a CNAME record instead of an A record, because then you effectively eliminate the need for administrating the domain. It's all Google's responsibility at that point. Also, Google employs load-balancers and (I think...) round-robin DNS to efficiently distribute the ...


4

Sure. This is an acceptable workaround. Better would be to configure the router not to expose the web interface for external IPs, configure it to run on a separate port than 80, password-protect the web interface. But sometimes you have these very cheap routers that can't be configured that way. Buying a better one is recommended but not necessary.


3

Your idea is correct. What you can do is make dev.example.com a CNAME that points to your home network. You need to figure out how to use DynDNS (it's really trivial, sign up then enter the information into your router). After which you make the CNAME point to your DynDNS domain. Make sure to redirect port 80 and 443 if your web server is behind NAT.


3

Here is your problem: james.dontexist.net has address 192.168.2.2 You've set up your dynamic DNS entry to point to a private RFC 1918 address. These addresses are not routable on the public Internet, so nobody outside your LAN would ever be able to reach you. To resolve the issue, use your public Internet address (provided by your ISP) instead. And ...


3

I would expect it to be the name of the host e.g. myhost as the zone would be dyndns.org.


3

This is because you are likely using a dynamic 'consumer' IP from your ISP. Most of these are blacklisted on Barracuda and similar RBL's due to various malware and spam sent over them without most users knowing (which is one of the many reasons you should use a static IP for any business needs.) You can try and get the IP removed but it will be wasted ...


3

Check your router as some routers have this function build in..


3

we use dnsmadeeasy, pretty reliable. But nonetheless, you can configure secondary name server as well as long as you are paying 2 providers to host your DNS.


3

One reason your DNS should be reliable is email. Assuming you're also hosting your own email server consider what happens when your system goes off-line for any reason. Self hosted: Any system trying to deliver a message sees there is no DNS for your domain and in most cases (dependent somewhat on how each system is configured) will give up as a permanent ...


3

My suggestion would be to move your name servers to DynDNS, set up your DNS records there, and install one of their dynamic DNS clients somewhere on your local network to keep your dynamic ip address in sync with your DNS records. I use DynDNS and host 6 web sites at home using their dynamic DNS client.


2

I actually managed to get dynamic updates to work using a patch provided by the samba 4 team. http://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Samba4/HOWTO#Step_10_Configure_kerberos_DNS_dynamic_updates There seems to be issues with the version of windows running and it's method of doing dynamic updates. If you're trying to do the same outside of a samba4 domain... your ...


2

DNS MX record priorities are really just what they sound like. You give each record a priority (the lower the number the higher the priority) and in theory mail servers try the highest priority record first, and if it doesn't respond they try the next one, etc. I'm a little unsure why you've got records listed from 10 to 70, have a look at this for the ...


2

Depending on the DNS server that they use you sometimes need to remove the priority value and place it in the separate priority field (like you would an MX record). The standard format for a SRV record is _service._proto.name TTL class SRV priority weight port target Using the Advanced interface you'd put _xmpp-server._tcp. in the Host box, SRV as the ...


2

Setting up your box to be able to receive email is pretty easy if your ISP doesn't block it. Getting the mail you send accepted is a lot more difficult, particularly since it sounds like you do not have a fixed address and thus no control of the reverse DNS records. Read through the questions here about "email and spam" to see all the various hoops you ...


2

There need be no connection between any external DNS name and any hostnames/internal DNS. What you call the hostname (sometimes the 'local part'), should be alphanumeric, no dots. There's a whole RFC on how to pick a name. Your DNS suffix ('domain name') is added to hostnames when you try and resolve them. As you say, even if you have servers 'foo' and ...


2

When I used DynDNS for their free dynamic service, I used foobar.dyndns.net as the domain and had the wildcard redirect enabled. That let everything work more or less transparently, since I could have local DNS and use vhosts to make sites appear at the same URLs on the inside and the outside. crb is completely correct that you can use whatever you want as ...


2

Three more free DNS providers that can be used as secondaries: Namecheap - http://www.namecheap.com/products/freedns.aspx Xname - http://www.xname.org/ (more than 25 domains is considered "abusive" without donation; see their conditions) ClouDNS - http://www.cloudns.net/ (max 6 domains free) I've used PointHQ: they don't really support being a secondary ...


2

•No bandwidth limit •Allowed to have unlimited traffic •No complaints about the content of my site from the ISP Yes, totally easy. First, make sure all users are connected to you not using the internet. Second, make sure you run the server and your users are in a country where all content is legal or noone else than your agreed upon trustworthy ...


2

You can use the afraid.org and it has many free clients to update the IP and if you have a dd-wrt it has support for it.


2

You could configure a simple openvpn setup between the two machines, then no matter what the home machine's public routable IP address is at the time it can still have the same address on the VPN that exists between the two machines. A simpler alternative would be to use tunnelling down SSH, but this is less reliable in the presence of intermittent ...



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