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3

If the second server is only outbound for applications, and Google Mail is for inbound and outbound (i.e. normal usage by users), then there is no need to touch the MX record. Just add the IP of the second server to a SPF Record, which requires access at the DNS level of your domain. There are several wizards online to assist you in the syntax. ...


3

Adding some X-Foo: cron header (with the X- prefix!) isn't a problem, you can add them as you like. Edit I forgot about http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6648. So scrap the X- part.


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Using option #1 is always the better solution. Think of it like paper mail; a functioning return address is mandatory. Email is only getting more restricted (DMARC, etc) due to spamers taking advantage of the open policy. It's really not that hard to automate dealing with replys you don't care about. But likely less than 10% of email servers are that ...


3

4 - handle the bounce. Generally the best approach is to cause the bounce to go to some sort of bounce-handling process so that persistently bouncing recipient address can ultimately be pruned out of your database. Which could be a .forward for "alice", or adjusting the envelope sender to be a handler process. Whether or not "alice" cares whether the ...


3

One thing that I note is that the delegation (in the org zone) looks like this: avuna.org. 86400 IN NS ns3.avuna.org. avuna.org. 86400 IN NS ns4.avuna.org. avuna.org. 86400 IN NS ns2.avuna.org. avuna.org. 86400 IN NS ns5.avuna.org. avuna.org. ...


3

Certificate validation will be done by the client. Use of wildcards is defined for POP, IMAP and SMTP, so a wildcard certificate should fit. But it might be that some older clients have problems, because the details for certificate handling in SMTP were only defined much later then for the other protocols so some old clients might not expect wildcards.


3

Or I should just use one domain to simplify it like mail.example.com for sending and receiving? Yes, I would advise it. In fact Google Apps using the same technique to handle the thousands domains pointing on it. Google Apps customer must setting his MX record to ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM (and friends). All users also use smtp.gmail.com and imap.gmail.com ...


3

I fixed it, but the fix wasn't so obvious. Having a missing postmaster_address setting was not the actual problem. dovecot-lda not looking at the correct config file was the actual problem. However the deeper problem seems to be this "feature" I randomly came across on Google https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/dovecot/+bug/671065 where The ...


2

Because of what you are trying to do I would suggest that you try hosting your email with a hosting provider and get your own domain so you can make any of those changes as require. Now as for your questions: Does using this fqdn is use-less in mail server setup? You Should use fqdn. How to verify that it is configured correctly? As stated by wtayyeb ...


2

Can anyone explain how this: https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=mail.luken-tech.pl&hideResults=on shows "Assessment failed: Unable to connect to server" SSLLabs only support HTTPS Testing. Your mail server speak with STARTTLS and SMTP protocol. The error message confirm the limitation Ports other than 443 not supported This ...


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No, for any zone (a.k.a. mail domain), there is a single set of authoritative servers, as designated by the MX records for that zone. If the mailbox does not exist on those servers, an NDR will be generated and sent back to the sending party.


2

In fact, the problem is simple: your JAMES server is running in an instance that's probably geographically far from where you usually are when you log in to your Gmail account, so it appears to Google like someone is trying to break into your account (after all, how can you be logging in from California and Virginia within a couple of hours of each other?). ...


2

The relay access denied message means that the mail server that got the message doesn't know anything about the domain (meaning there are no local mailboxes that it can drop the message in) so it then tries to relay the message to it's remote host. However, since the sender didn't authenticate with a password, it refuses to relay it to the remote system. ...


2

The configuration above (apparently from this page) is used to allow internal-only communication and block the email from outside to internal. For your case, you need to modify it # /etc/postfix/main.cf: smtpd_recipient_restrictions = ... check_recipient_access hash:/etc/postfix/protected_destinations ...the usual stuff... ...


1

Does your organisation operate its own certificate authority for internal servers? Perhaps you need to add the CA certificates for the Exchange server into the certificate trust store for Exim? A lot of products don't report this error very well (I don't know if Exim does or not). Wireshark (capture first on the server with tcpdump -p -s0 -w /tmp/foo.pcap ...


1

Unsure if my answer is useful, but wouldn't you look for answer at (active forums) community.zimbra.com, or (archived forums) forums.zimbra.com For example: Changing ZWC (Zimbra Web Client) Theme Colors and Logo in zimbra administration_guide Zimbra Forum: Changing Zimbra 7.0 Login Screen The default theme for zimbraAdmin, zimbra and zimlets are ...


1

Postfix and sendmail are different implementations of Mail Transfer Agents which are using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) for email transport over the Internet. Postfix first released in 1998 intended to be an alternative to the widely used Sendmail MTA which was used widely since 1982. Here are the summaries of all 4 popular mail agents: And ...


1

In general, I agree that #1 is probably the best solution, you can just discard any returns at the server. Install a .forward that sends messages to /dev/null. It's unlikely your bandwidth bill will hurt. To the wider discussion as to whether you should care about messages not being delivered, I don't really know anyone processing their own returns at any ...


1

In general it is not possible to easily determine why a particular message has been marked as spam by the Google Mail spam filters. Having said that however one item that is an easy test is to check whether admin@domain.com is in your recipients contact list. Contacts are far less likely to have their emails marked as spam. You should also review the bulk ...


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Not really sure what you are asking for in #1. Are you asking if a PTR record is used in a mail server setup? Technically no it is not, but as a PTR record is used as the counterpoint for an A record, there are merits to having it properly configured (also, depending on other servers configurations regarding doing lookups to authenticate your server, it can ...


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If you want to serve smtp/imap for subdomains then one dedicated subdomain is preferrable. IMHO you even shouldn't split your services into two or more separate subdomains like smtp.example.com and pop.example.com. Just use mail.example.com that can be used for smtp/pop/imap and even http if you plan to launch some webmail.


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Use something like: formail -i "To: user@example.com" -s sendmail -t < /var/spool/mail/USER formail is usually included with procmail. This will add a new To: header while replacing any old To: header with Old-To:. sendmail -t is executed for each message found in the standard input.



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