New answers tagged

0

You should instead look at auditing access control changes and non-owner access to mailboxes. Office 365 can do this, but only alerts on such incidents at the highest tier E5 plan today. If this is on your roadmap, then you are practically solved.


0

Assuming that you have set up SPF, DKIM, rDNS and that you are not blacklisted, your only options is Microsoft Smart Network Data Services. No kidding. That is official MS's program for registering responsible person (administrator) for IP address on which mail server runs. That way you can observe and review status of IP address of your mail server. MS ...


0

Doing an ARIN lookup of your IP, it looks like it's coming from a provider that offers cloud hosting services. It seems pretty standard for Cloud hosting providers to get blacklisted simply because of how often IP addresses can change hands and how easy it is for instances to send Spam. Mail services end up black listing the entire hosting provider's block....


0

The headers you posted don't really look like Hotmail Headers. Can you log into hotmail online not through thunderbird and grab the headers from the actual email. They normally contain all the codes to tell you why it's going to spam. I did check your IP at Symantec and it was clean (sometimes that's the culprit for Hotmail issues). You also might have a ...


0

The currently relevant RFC, RFC 5322, states how an email should be formatted. It does not specify how any email program (whether server or client) should handle emails which are not properly formatted. Thus, it is up to whoever writes the software to make that decision. In other words, there is no general answer to your question. Some programs may give an ...


1

Well I fixed the problem by installing iRedMail package on my CentOS 6. I also bought SSL certificate from Comondo Positive SSL so emails are trusted. Not to forget, OpendKIM and SPF records MUST BE ADDED to DNS records. If you do this then there is no way google will reject your email. Also make sure your domain is not added to blacklist, you can check that ...


0

@Mkgl - In technical terms, it depends. If bob@example.com is sending mail from the example.com (IP Address). Then it will pass If bob@example.com is sending mail from a different IP, then it won't even use the Example SPF to validate against (since it's not the sending IP). Remember the SPF is the 5321.FROM which is the "Return-Path" not the "From" on ...


0

Some alternative approaches I can think of: Enable forward rules on the mailbox, you can specify that only mail from certain senders will be forwarded and you can still keep a copy in the mailbox. Transport rules could be configured to forward messages to alternate addresses. Use MS Flow or Zappier to create a workflow that forwards messages to personal ...


3

Spoofing sender addresses is a common spoofing technique. As you have control of the domain adding a SPF record with a '-all' final policy should discourage spoofing addresses in the domain. If there are email addresses in the domain then a policy of "v=spf1 mx -all" would be appropriate, otherwise use a policy like "v=spf1 -all". Given that neither of ...


0

If you don't want to reveal your public IP you can't have any DNS recording pointing to it. Sounds like you set up an A record, which isn't required, you just needed an MX record. Suggest you remove the A record and sign up for hosted email, Google or FastMail are good options, but there are plenty. Point your MX record at the hosted email, and set up SPF as ...


1

The only requirement for incoming email is that you have an MX record that is an A record. That MX record could be any hostname, and it doesn't even have to be a subdomain of your domain. So, there's no problem with using abc.example.com. With regard to the website showing when accessed by mail.example.com, that really depends on how you have your webserver ...


1

Yes, it should work, because you specifically list such server as allowed through the a: specification.


2

99% of the time, email is delivered via the MX record mechanism. The MX record designates which server is authoritatively responsible for accepting email for a given domain. But that doesn't mean that this server is also the server where the recipients mailbox is. The MX record only designates which server to deliver the email to, it doesn't designate which ...


2

This statement is not accurate: " Email delivery is done by Sender's Mail Server sending E-Mail directly to Receiptent's Domain Mail-Server" For example, at my firm, when I send an email from my mail client, I might not have an externally-facing SMTP server at my site. Mail might be routed within my company's Exchange infrastructure. Then, it might ...


0

This is an interesting scenario. I have a few of these groups setup, and no special configuration was required. They seem to be routed and delivered according to MX records. Are the recipients added as mail contacts inside Exchange? It may also be something with the send connector. I know for local Exchange 2013/2016, you have to grant extended ...


2

It really depends on the domain you're sending to. Different rules for different domains. Most Domains will Greylist you for a period of time, blacklisting usually occurs when users mark your emails as spam or is mal-ware is detected.


0

Yes it is. However, note that the mechanisms are evaluated in order[1]. Therefore, if _spf.example.net were to include Fail mechanisms, they'd trigger before a mx ip4:111.111.111.111. If that's not what you want, leave the includes at the end, just before the ~all. [1] http://www.openspf.org/SPF_Record_Syntax


2

You almost got it, but I believe the formatting has to be: v=spf1 a mx ip4:111.111.111.111 ip4:222.222.222.222 include:_spf.example.net ~all With the "a" and "mx" at the beginning. Edit: ~all is fine to use, but it's recommended to use -all for SPF to work more effectively.


0

The MX record should "point" to whichever server handles email for your domain.


1

First, just to be sure: The highest priority is the one with the lowest preference value. Second: Naturally, the first contact for your mail (hightest priority) needs to be your actual mail server, not the web server. Also, you should only list the web server at all as an MX if it is configured to actually handle incoming mail in a meaningful way.


1

exim can detect the presence of the A record && absence of the PTR record with ACL and then any action can be performed via routers. $sender_host_name, $host_lookup_failed and $host_lookup_deferred do all the trick. The problem is that spammers are often use such poorly configured but still legal hosts for submission (ISP's dynamically addressed ...


1

if you want all the emails being sent via gmail, you have to set relayhost to smtp.gmail.com:587 as you wrote. This is not enough, though. You need to create and edit the file /etc/postfix/sasl_passwd Write a line in it like below: smtp.gmail.com:587 user@example.com:password where: user@example.com is a valid username in your gmail hosted domain ...


1

The signed header fields (the h-tag) in the DKIM signature is empty. According to the RFC 6376 it must however contain at least one header name. The recommended header fields to sign are described in section 5.4 of the RFC. Probably the DKIM_SIGN_HEADERS variable contains something invalid. dkim_sign_headers according to the Exim specification: ...


1

It turns out I shouldn't have had the below enabled as well as a mis configuration in the DNS record pointed out by eranga dkim_sign_headers = DKIM_SIGN_HEADERS


-2

The simplest, rawest way to do it would be to tap your organization's internet gateway, listening for connections to the mail server and perform packet capture on all emails going inbound and out. Store the captured packets in some sort of noSQL db. There are some open-source project that can do this (Moloch comes to mind) but you might have to get a bit ...


2

I think you may be looking for a service or appliance such as the Barracuda Message Archiver. I use the appliance version and it indexes all mail as it is sent / received.


11

Honestly, indexing data of any sort from multiple places in multiple formats is a recipe for disaster. You would be better off setting up your own internal email server, switching to a provider that offers indexing features, or adding a proxy-email server are pretty much your best options. All three of those suggestions come with their own pros and cons. ...


0

If your router supports ddns (dynamic dns) you can register on one of free ddns websites, create subdomain yourdomain.ddnsservice and set your mx record to point to yourwebsite.ddnsservice with shortest ttl you can chose: yourdomain. 300 in mx 0 yourdomain.ddnsservice. Setting mx record with small ttl value will allow more frequent check which you prefere ...


0

Do not use LDA from postfix, use dovecot's deliver instead. Detailed explanation can be found at http://wiki.dovecot.org/LDA/Postfix If implemented, dovecot become the only service that have an access to the storage so there is no permission collision between postfix and dovecot.


0

You have mentioned that you created a DKIM and SPF record on Google Apps. After you moved to Zoho, you need to do the same thing. Here is a link to Zoho that will show you how and what SPF and DKIM records to add to your DNS. From my understanding, without an SPF and DKIM record, your emails are not verified. This means Yahoo! cannot verify that you are ...


0

If dsync is not available on the source server you can use fetch utility on the target one. Exact commandline is depend on the target configuraton so you have to dig in the given direction.


0

Can you provide spf record that you've set and header of email that was rejected. Reason for rejection is spf settings so you either didn't include sending server to your spf record or record itself is not valid.


0

I wouldn't recommend doing it that way. The reason that many hosts disable domain forwarding is that it encourages spam. It is a common practice for spammers to send spam to random users at a given domain. So, they'll try addresses like bob@yourdomain.com, george@yourdomain.com, and so forth. Most of the time, sending to these addresses just give the sender ...


0

Going on the assumption that you are just a cPanel user, and don't have WHM access... and that you saying that the option to set "default address" is disabled by your host. If so, then mail not addressed to a defined email address won't make it to the rules, as the mail will be rejected right away. IOW. Since the catchall option is disabled by the ...


1

I searched Google for "Nginx as email proxy server" and found this article on the Nginx website on how to use Nginx as an email proxy server. Just change the port in the configuration. Perhaps you should try reading the official documentation then ask a question if it doesn't work for you.


1

You said that you're not sending from same server where you receive your mail. If you have another server that you're using for sending (different ip from you A record), you need to add that ip in your spf record: "v=spf1 a mx ip4:xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx ip4:yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy ip6:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::xxx ~all" You should get either bounce message sent to your ...


1

Most people use MX or A in their SPF record that covers all of your MX Records and A Records v=spf1 mx a -all If you're not sending from your MX records then you can list out the ip4 addresses you send from. The best way to create your SPF Record, if you're not sure is to use an SPF Wizard You'll go through the questionnaire and it will produce the ...


1

If you just have those two IP-addresses sending mail for the mydomain.com domain, your SPF record should look like this: v=spf1 ip4:1.1.1.1 ip4:2.2.2.2 -all Do not use +all in a SPF record, since that allow the whole internet to send mail from your domain. In the final SPF record you should use -all to indicate that ONLY the listed entries are allowed to ...


1

The RFCs generally recommend a limit of 100 recipient addresses per message. The mail server may expand this list if a recipient is a list known to the server. This applies to the envelope recipients, not the recipients listed on the header. For a mailing lists, it is bad practice to list the recipients unless the message is being sent to a single user, ...


1

You can use uuencode to encode the attachment. Most email clients recognize uuencoded attachments. Make sure there is an empty line after email headers in email.txt file. Sendmail expects "raw" message. #!/bin/sh (cat email.txt; uuencode foo.pdf foo.pdf)|/usr/sbin/sendmail -i -- johndow@example.com


1

You really shouldn't call sendmail directly but use mail or mailx which will also help you set up the correct headers and such. Moderns version of those support adding attachments with the -a option. The alternative, is to MIME (base645) encode your attachment and include it, with the correct headers in the body of your raw email text and submit that to ...


2

That's not how sendmail works. It just deals with transporting the mail and expects a properly encoded mail already. You could do this encoding yourself or just use mail/mailx/mutt instead to hand over a suitable mail over to sendmail for delivery.


0

How are you maintaining the time on your server. If you have a poorly running clock, then the time may need to be jumped periodically. This may cause sudo to notice future timestamps and try to fix them. However, I would expect different message. If you are using ntp with poor conectivity or a large step setting time may jump far enough that sudo would ...


1

You write: my domain points to my server as I'm already hosting the website. This is wrong, and it is one of your two problems. The name www.one3community.com points to 104.27.163.48, so far so good. Mail, however, is sent to the MX record of the domain, and failing that it is sent to the IP address of the domain. There is at the time of writing no MX ...


0

From ssmtp's manpage: -t Read message, searching for recipients. ``To:'', `Cc:'', and ``Bcc:'' lines will be scanned for people to send to. Any addresses in the argument list will be suppressed (not sup- ported). Apparently what -t does (should do) is to read recipients from the To: headers inside the ...


0

Your spf policy is strict as -all states that all email sent from unallowed sources is to be rejected. "v=spf1 ip4:41.76.211.241 -all" You have two sollutions. Change policy to less strict by changing -all (reject all email unless sent from allowed source) to ~all 2, Add IP that you're also sending from. New record would look like this: "v=spf1 +ip4:...


1

... the from email is not used by the other mail server to check for SPF but the return-path mail... SPF only checks the sender address given in the SMTP envelope, i.e. what you call "Return-Path". SPF does not care about the contents of the mail itself including the mail header. This also means that SPF does not care about the 'From' header and thus does ...


0

In fact, the problem is not with either. Your SPF record is "v=spf1 ip4:41.76.211.241 -all". This means that only a machine with IP 41.76.211.241 is allowed to send a message as being from itensityonline.co.za, no relay or other action is allowed. this means that a mail server receiving a message from the itensityonline.co.za domain will only allow ...


0

If the specific emails should be separated, you won't be able to handle all emails within a single users account in Zimbra's mailstore. You could filter them for forwarding into specific folders, but for a complete separation you'll need different accounts. An almost automatic solution for separation of emails into different accounts would be in using the ...


3

First, you need to differentiate your software needs. Courier always uses end user system accounts to store mails, Dovecot can be configured not to use them, and Cyrus never uses system accounts (all email is stored under cyrus:mail system account, and authentication is only performed against non-system sasl databases). In general, Courier and Dovecot is ...



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