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3

Windows Server 2012 includes a new SMB (3.0) transport encryption option. http://blogs.technet.com/b/filecab/archive/2012/05/03/smb-3-security-enhancements-in-windows-server-2012.aspx


0

You can either fix the ciphers manually as suggested in other answer or, when applicable, simply upgrade to FreeIPA 4.0.3 which fixes the ciphers out of the box (upstream ticket). This is what I get with FreeIPA 4.0.3 or 4.1.0 Alpha1: # nmap --script ssl-cert,ssl-enum-ciphers -p 636 `hostname` Starting Nmap 6.40 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2014-10-09 01:52 EDT ...


1

You would have to use an LDAP browser such as Apache Directory Studio to modify your configuration or the built-in LDAP utility ldapmodify. I will outline the steps to use ldapmodify, since it will help it make sense if you opt to use a UI tool. To use ldapmodify, you first create an ldif file that has a specific syntax and then import it. Note that the ...


0

In EncFS the filenames and the data have different initialisation vectors. That prevents an attacker from encrypting data (or filenames) and compare it to the cypthertext. As mentioned in the default answer, the password is actually only used to encrypt the Key. And the Key is used to encrypt the data. So assuming you changed the password you can reencrypt ...


0

The short answer is: maybe. If you created the key with the KEY_SOURCE argument when you created the key and you have the value that you specified at creation time, then you'd just issue the same create symmetric key statement again in RDS and you should have the same key as in your source. If you didn't do that, then no. It doesn't appear that there is ...


-1

Large enterprise systems are by default protected even from the possible root hacks by the access control systems such as RBAC or some variant of MAC. Sleske's comment supports this statement. Check Wiki for more details. However, if you are user on the smaller or medium size system you must that must have "all-mighty but not trusted" root account you have ...


1

Besides using SSL to access websites, you can use 802.1x to provide encrypted communications on your LAN in general. Doing this is a little more complex than can be explained in one post, but it generally involves setting up a host authentication method on the LAN. The typical use case for this particular technology is enforcing that only IT-sanctioned ...


4

However, since the client is not going to be accessing the server via a public URL, my understanding is that I cannot use a signed SSL certificate, leaving me open to SSL certificate injection attacks. That is nonsense. There is no requirement that certificates signed by trusted CAs must only be used on publicly-accessible URLs. Other options? ...


1

If you have some control over configuration of the client devices, you could serve as a certifying authority, either using the OpenSSL command, Red Hat/Fedora Dogtag PKI or the CA role for an Active Directory Domain Server. Create a CA under your control, ask the customers to install the certificate from your CA in their clients' trusted CA store ...



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