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2

Others have suggested various symmetric encryption tools which are suitable for pipelining, such as aespipe. I suspect those will be about as efficient as you can get, given that encryption is a fairly CPU-expensive sort of thing to do, and it's not a bad suggestion. But I'd suggest considering an asymmetric tool such as gpg. The under-the-hood bulk ...


0

I couldn't stop thinking about this, so I installed another T2 machine with Solaris 10 and the pkcs11 patches. It seems that, although not stated in dmesg, openssl engine or otherwise, hardware acceleration for the Niagara CPU is already implemented in Linux: Solaris 10 # /usr/sfw/bin/openssl speed aes-128-cbc -engine pkcs11 engine "pkcs11" set. Doing ...


2

@DanFarrell is partly correct in as much as you need the secret key to decrypt it - however if you have the secret key (ie you own the webserver thats being banned - which is implied as you say the packets are incoming) it can be decrypted - but probably not by iptables. You may be able to set up a reverse proxy (or depending on your network even offload ...


1

Can't be done. You can't decrypt just HTTPS traffic; you need the secret key to decrypt it. That's the whole point of HTTPS - the TLS layer protects against snooping at points in the path between server and client.


0

Sadly, I don't think this is possible. I may be wrong. Depending on your host OS, you can have your OS look at a crypt-tab file. Here's a good guide for CentOS: Crypto Disk in CentOS There's a really cool section in that guide which uses a USB key to boot. Almost like a TPM. ;) Good luck!


0

Migrate your files to another server that you own... else its like keeping a safe in an airport walkway


4

The only way to prevent an administrator from accessing a file or files is by encrypting them with a key which the other administrator does not have. In that vein, you could look into using EFS to encrypt your Plesk files, but any permissions or access restrictions you place on the files in question can be undone by any user with administrator rights - ...


4

Unfortunately, as for as admin rights are concerned you either trust the person or you don't. You can change the NTFS permissions and ownership of the folders, but they can take ownership of the folder themselves and change the permissions, delete the folder, etc.


11

No. There is no way to prevent an admin from being an admin. You cannot simultaneously have your files encrypted in such a manner so as to keep them safe from the prying eyes of another administrator on the system, and have an application seamlessly decrypt and access those files in a way that an administrator could not also mimic. To suggest otherwise ...


3

The answer, based on the STARTTLS RFC for SMTP (RFC 3207) is: STARTTLS is less secure than TLS. Instead of doing the talking myself, I will allow the RFC to speak for itself, with the four relevant bits highlighted in BOLD: A man-in-the-middle attack can be launched by deleting the "250 STARTTLS" response from the server. This would cause the ...



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