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76

Changes to environment variables should take effect immediately, if you make the change via the main Properties dialog for the computer in question (go to My Computer | Properties | Advanced | Environment Variables). After the changes are saved, Explorer broadcasts a WM_SETTINGCHANGE message to all windows to inform them of the change. Any programs spawned ...


22

There's no such thing as an "ideal monitor setup" because there's no such thing as a "canonical user" either ! (plus the setup you need depends on the tasks you have to perform) That being said, the strategy I use at my company is simple : Get every developer as many monitors as he asks for. Plain and simple. (And I should mention I am running this ...


19

I've always heard 40%, though I can't back that up. I will say though that you need some humidity to reduce static electricity build up. EDIT: Ah, I found my documentation, good old Sun Microsystems Part No. 805-5863-13, "Sun Microsystems Data Center Site Planning Guide: Data Centers’ Best Practices" Temperature and relative humidity conditions ...


13

One thing to keep in mind is that many programs obtain the environmental variables when they're first started, so while windows may not need a restart, some programs might before they'll be able to use the new variables. Good example of this is having to open a new command prompt window after adding a PATH (yes, I've been tripped up by this).


12

In a command prompt type: runas /user:yourusername@yourdomain cmd It will open up a new cmd prompt and type: taskkill /f /im explorer.exe Then type: explorer.exe Now after closing all command prompts, you will see that the PATH variable has been truly updated. All command prompts must be closed. Then reopen a new command prompt, type path and you will ...


12

I think 24" monitors are more or less the standard these days. Get two per person if you can.


12

You could use "w" or "who" command output. When you connect over ssh, they'll show your source IP.


9

I usually use etckeeper for backing up configuration files in /etc (actually for revisioning them), I set it to perform commit every 20 minutes and BackupPC for backing up everything else. BackupPC is probably an overkill in your situation so I suggest you to use just rsync -a to some other host.


7

So there's two things, back up your data and configuration files write down / record the commands you used to build the environment and why For number 1, there are several options, one of which Alex has already mentioned. rsync is a nice approach, and I rsync everything I care about on my Linux VPS to a Linux machine here at home on a regular basis. ...


7

In my experience, Replace crappy factory fans (CPU, GPU, and power supply) with quality fans. The bigger the fan, the better - a bigger fan typically needs to move less air than a small fan to produce the same effect (yes, I know it's oversimplified, but there you go.) Replace video cards with passive cooled versions, or even get rid of discrete video ...


7

Just convert the estimated draw from Watts to BTUs: To calculate the BTUs/hour, multiply the watts by 3.413. 1 ton of cooling is equivalent to 12,000 BTU/hour. Most of the energy drawn will be converted to waste heat. From what I am reading, a pro would tell you to have someone come in and do the full calculation. That would take into effect any odd heat ...


6

Whilst I don't have enough of a reputation to comment on the highest voted answer to this question, I would like to state that it is not exactly correct. I know this because no matter which workaround I tried in this post, nothing actually worked. The kb article linked to in that answer actually states that: However, note that modifications to the ...


6

I'd say at least give the developers two screens. It makes shifting between documentation and the IDE easier and there are several studies that some gains in productivity. Regardless of developer pay and keeping in mind productivity gains of 30% with dual monitor setup, buying a second monitor is actually quite cheap if you start calculating about it. If ...


6

From the manpage regarding aliases: Note aliases are not expanded by default in non-interactive shell, and it can be enabled by setting the 'expand_aliases' shell option using shopt. So try using shopt -s expand_aliases at the start of your sourcing script. This should let you use Warner's suggestion.


5

You could go with a standard APC NetBotz solution. They've added external particulate sensors to the sensor suite. This would give you thresholding, SNMP and alert capabilities versus some of the handheld real-time units.


4

Make any changes you need to make to /etc/skel. When you invoke useradd, it'll copy the content of this folder into the user's home directory, automatically. http://www.linuxhowtos.org/Tips%20and%20Tricks/using_skel.htm


4

Sounds like some push back from the vendor, but either way we used to have Air Particulate Meters in an old pharma company I worked for. They basically will measure everything in the air and tell you what's there. Dust is technically many different particles from various sources so you have to know what the individual makeup of the air is. Unfortunately ...


4

First step would be a "househould" particle counter which you can get for around 200$, e.g. at Amazon.


4

This is exactly why Vagrant was created: http://www.vagrantup.com/ Develop on the same platform as you deploy on, run the same versions of packages, and have everyone commit/pull from source control. Use a package/configuration management system (puppet or chef) and you're golden.


4

You could add SSH_* to env_keep in sudoers so that this can be detected while switched to the other user.


4

If you want to know if you bash shell is directly a child process of sshd (not n>1 layers deep) you can cat /proc/$PPID/status | head -1 | cut -f2 it should give you sshd or whatever is the parent process name of your current shell.


4

Here is a great answer I found on unix.stackexchange: If one of the variables SSH_CLIENT or SSH_TTY is defined, it's an ssh session. The login shell's parent process can be checked with ps -o comm= -p $PPID. If it is sshd, it's an ssh session. if [ -n "$SSH_CLIENT" ] || [ -n "$SSH_TTY" ]; then SESSION_TYPE=remote/ssh else case $(ps -o comm= -p ...


3

I think you want to rethink the way you're thinking of the problem. The question isn't "am I logged in via SSH, because I want to turn off certain commands." It's "am I logged in at the console, because then I will enable certain commands."


3

Honestly a school, church, temple, etc. in your area will probably be your best bet for a guinea pig to test your software on. Odds are a company won't let you in the door unless they see some serious value in helping you out. Microsoft has some large labs, but they are for running workloads against Enterprise hardware not system monitoring. You might be ...


3

Whilst you're right about a small degree of humidity helping a little I'd still try to avoid any more than can be cheaply removed. Certainly I wouldn't plan a data center based on the assumption that my heat-scrubbing capacity was reliant on that humidity effect. Design for the lowest humidity and get some of those low/high/average/current alerter things in ...


3

Sounds good, but what you'll definitely need, is some bug tracker (Trac, Bugzilla, ...) An internal Wiki is a good idea, too. I'd use WebDAV with HTTPs (or sftp) instead of ftp though. About the server: As long as there are no security concerns (different people using different services, or people allowed to access some services from the Web, while others ...


3

Recommendation Start learning to use, and using the AWS Command-line, combined with your own homegrown solution to manage your DNS entries. I personally have a solution which rounds up multiple text files (each with customer identification and comments contained) into one file, which then ships off to my authoritative DNS whenever there is an update. More ...


3

Taking a quick look at the documentation: The SetEnvIf directive defines environment variables based on attributes of the request. The attribute specified in the first argument can be one of three things: An HTTP request header field (see RFC2616 for more information about these); for example: Host, User-Agent, Referer, and Accept-Language. A ...


3

If you have some budget, why not purchase a machine to run as a Xen server and give the developers virtual machines on which they can play? The VMs can all come from the same image and have the same software setup as your testing and production boxes.


3

A lot depends on what you want to achieve. You can happily run all of the above concurrently on an ESXi box with 8GB of RAM, a quad core CPU and a pair of reasonably fast (10k) disks in a RAID 1 array for the datastore. You're going to have fairly minimal hardware configs on the VM's and I don't think ESXi can handle OS X, at least I've never heard of anyone ...



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