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3

Don't use a self-signed certificate with Exchange. It's cheap enough to get a valid cert that will allow Outlook Anywhere to work properly. In addition you don't have to mess with mobile phones or tablets that would need the self-signed certificate trusted and installed.


2

Make sure the URL fit the certificate. Issue those command via powershell to validate; Get-ActiveSyncVirtualDirectory | fl internalurl,externalurl Get-AutoDiscoverVirtualDirectory | fl internalurl,externalurl Get-ECPVirtualDirectory | fl internalurl,externalurl Get-OabVirtualDirectory | fl internalurl,externalurl Get-WebServicesVirtualDirectory | fl ...


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For on-premises Exchange 2013, you can set some specific spam-handling options, on a per-mailbox basis. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb123981(v=exchg.150).aspx Items of note AntiSpamBypassEnabled (for your Spam Quarantine idea?) SCLJunkEnabled (Items meeting SCL threshold ((See next)) go to Junk Email folder, Boolean.) SCLJunkThreshold(Set ...


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It turns out the users being affected were accessing up to 30 calendars in any one session. For some reason, the outlook clients were saturating all available connections to the server and then once reaching the limit, would produce the symptoms identified. The issue was resolved with modifying the throttling policy on the exchange server.


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I don't believe that an Exchange email sent internally is able to be modified this way. The other method has to do with transport rules, which are implemented by connectors. This may be a case of using the wrong tool for the job. Perhaps something along the lines of a comment form on an internal web page would be better suited for your purposes.


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It sounds like you may want to use the particular predicate AnyOfToHeader. Technet Article for reference. My bigger question is: Why is this junk getting through EOP? I occasionally get documents with macros inside archives, but typically EOP is quick to filter out recurrences of these items. I have taken a different approach in my tenant with regard to ...


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Permission Group: ms-Exch-SMTP-Accept-Any-Recipient Via PowerShell: (includes anti-spam bypass) Get-ReceiveConnector <RelayName> | Add-ADPermission –User “NAME” –ExtendedRights ms-Exch-SMTP- Accept-Any-Recipient,ms-exch-bypass-anti-spam


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There's no requirement to use a specific FROM address when relaying email through O365 as a specific user. You only need a licensed account with a mailbox. We've found benefits to relaying our mail though Office 365 which we didn't get from going direct to the receiving mail host: You can make use of transport rules, outbound spam, malware filtering, etc. ...


1

You could, the real problem isn't getting the message via lync, but about having an effective audit trail for when on call developer doug ignores the IM. He could always claim he didn't get the IM, but SMTP has complete delivery headers, showing that the mail was in the mailbox he was supposed to be checking. If that's not important than yes its possible, ...


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Check output for following cmdlets: Get-ClientAccessServer | FT Name,AutodiscoverServiceInternalUri,AutodiscoverServiceExternalUri -Autosize Get-OutlookAnywhere | FT Name,EXCHANGE -Autosize Get-OutlookProvider In addition, make sure the version of the Outlook client is properly patched to the minimum required Exchange version. •Outlook 2013 ...


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Try deleting the auto-complete address cache (Instructions here). We had this problem when we moved from GoogleApps to Office365. The cached addresses were pointing to Google and threw that error. Clearing the cache (or using the global address list to share) fixed it.


1

As always it depends. Should the original messages remain on the hosted Exchange or not? Regardless the de facto Linux method of synching (new) messages from a remote email box is fetchmail. That allows you to do either. Then have fetchmail feed the email messages to a script that strips the attachments from the message bodies and store them in an archive ...


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There may be better reasons but this is why I would do it: The main reason I would keep them separate is flexibility and isolation, to allow the migration of one service but not the other. If you decide you want a different IP address for SMTP or you want to move one of the service to a different server it may be easier to use different domains and may also ...



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