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Actually there's an even simpler script that shows the problem. We want to be able to run the following script as a normal user (as root it runs fine): #!/bin/sh dd if=/dev/zero bs=8192 count=128 of=disk.img mkfs -t ext2 -F disk.img losetup /dev/loop0 disk.img mount /dev/loop0 echo aaaa > /mnt/aa umount /mnt losetup -d /dev/loop0 To that end, we ...


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Thanks for all the answers, I understand now the permissions of the mountpoint come from the mounted directory. This thing is that what I am mounting is not a directory, but an image of a block device in a file. The point is to be able to create an image of a USB disk in memory (that's why we are mounting it to TMPFS in /tmp, that's much much faster than ...


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The issue here is that a mounted filesystem has its own permissions and will not inherit the permissions of the directory (or mountpoint) it is mounted to. The solution is to set your permissions after the partition is mounted. In order to do that you can use: chmod 777 /tmp/loop0p2 However this may not fully resolve the issue since if you also have ...


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You will have to manually give write permissions after mount. chmod 777 /your directory umask and rw will not work in ext file system.



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